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Collection

Alexis St. Martin collection, 1879

10 items

This collection is made up of correspondence and newspaper clippings by or related to Alexis St. Martin, a French-Canadian man who underwent medical experimentation and observation after surviving an open stomach wound.

This collection is made up of correspondence and newspaper clippings by or related to Alexis St. Martin, a French-Canadian man who underwent medical experimentation and observation after surviving an open stomach wound.

Eight letters and postcards, July-September 1879, pertain to James H. Etheridge's proposals to Alexis St. Martin, requesting that he visit Rush Medical College in Chicago, Illinois, for observation. Alexis St. Martin (3 items) and Henry F. Harris (4 items) wrote about St. Martin's possible involvement and financial compensation. Two newspaper clippings, written before 1880, concern St. Martin's wound, his later life, and Dr. William Beaumont's experiments on St. Martin's stomach. See the Detailed Box and Folder Listing for information about each individual item.

Collection

Anne Waldman Papers, 1945-2012 (majority within 1965-2000)

119.5 Linear feet (85 record center boxes, 7 ms. boxes, 4 large flat oversize boxes, 10 medium flat oversize boxes, 2 small flat oversize boxes and 2 portfolios.) — Printed material in boxes 77-80 and Portfolio 1; Artwork in boxes 81, 82, 99-108, and Portfolio 2; Photographs in boxes 83, 84, and 98 (includes slides); Audiovisual materials in boxes 85-92 (including reformatted copies).

American poet; co-founder of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. Papers include correspondence, poems, essays, photographs, art, biographical material, and audiovisual materials.

The Anne Waldman Papers were purchased by the Special Collections Library in 1998. Periodic additions to the collection have been made.

The papers document Waldman's personal and professional life from childhood to adulthood in great detail, and provide a rich and unique source for the study of American poetry. The collection includes textual material, photographs, audiovisual material, and artwork that extensively document Waldman's writing, publishing and performance efforts; her administrative leadership and teaching activities at the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church-in-the-Bowery and Naropa University's Writing and Poetics program; and her relationships and interactions with a remarkable number of prominent poets, writers, and artists.

The Biographical series (approximately .5 linear feet) contains biographical summaries written by Waldman and others, resumes, travel and work itineraries, and publicity material such as press releases, pamphlets, and quotes and "blurbs" for books.

A highlight of the series is Waldman's autobiographical essay and drafts for the Contemporary Authors' series. A small folder of poems written about Waldman is also included. The researcher should note that additional material written about Waldman can be found in the Correspondence and Name File Series.

The Correspondence and Name File series (25 linear feet of material, divided into several subseries) provides insight into Waldman's professional activities and relationships, and her personal relationships with many poets, writers, and artists. Poets including Allen Ginsberg, Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Tom Clark, Diane di Prima, Kenward Elmslie, Joanne Kyger, Bernadette Mayer, Ron Padgett, and many others are well represented in the series, as are visual artists such as Alex Katz, Jasper Johns, Robert Mapplethorpe, Larry Rivers, and James Rosenquist. Material in the Correspondence and Name File was created during Waldman's college years and adulthood (approximately 1962-1999). Correspondence from Waldman's childhood and teenage years, and correspondence with family members can be found in the Early Years and Family series respectively.

The Name File subseries is an alphabetical file consisting primarily of more prominent personalities and frequent correspondents. Although the bulk of the material in the Name File is correspondence, manuscripts and other material created by or related to the person listed may also be found in the files. Where large amounts of material related to a person exist, the type of material has been grouped by genre and indicated separately in the finding aid. In cases where the type of material is not listed separately, the file contains mainly correspondence, but may also include small amounts of other material, most likely manuscripts. The researcher should note that some manuscripts submitted to Waldman and a small amount of correspondence related to Waldman's specific publishing ventures or specific subjects have been left with the appropriate subject file or organizational records.

The Miscellaneous Correspondence subseries contains more routine correspondence. This subseries is arranged alphabetically.

The Unidentified and Fragments subseries consists of approximately .75 linear feet of material from correspondents who did not identify themselves, identified themselves by their first name only, or whose signatures were illegible. This material is arranged chronologically, and is divided in to unidentified correspondence and unidentified manuscripts. Although every effort was made to arrange correspondence in the appropriate place in the Name File and Miscellaneous Correspondence subseries, researchers interesting in viewing all the correspondence from a particular person may want to examine the Unidentified and Fragments subseries.

The series also includes two folders of Anne Waldman's outgoing correspondence, as well as several folders of printouts of Waldman's outgoing and incoming email. The email correspondence spans the years 1997 and 2009. Researchers should note that there is substantial overlap between the Email and Correspondence and Name File subseries.

The Writing series (11 linear feet) consists of Anne Waldman manuscripts and other material, such as correspondence, administrative files, and ephemera, related to her writing. This series is divided into five subseries: Early Work; Fiction; Essays, Speeches, and Interviews; Poetry; and Contributions to Other Works.

The Fiction sub-subseries is divided into Drama and Short Stories. Much of this material is also early work, from Waldman's college years or shortly thereafter. Within Drama and Short Stories, the pieces are arranged alphabetically by title.

Essays, Speeches, and Interviews comprises Waldman's prose work, consisting of essays, articles, speeches and addresses, and interviews, as well as book blurbs, introductions, forewords, and reviews. Many of these pieces exist in various stages, from handwritten notes to published articles. The Essays grouping contains essays and articles written for various publications. The Speeches grouping, arranged chronologically, consists of speeches and speaker introductions made by Waldman at various events. Undated material is located at the end of the section. The Interviews grouping is divided into interviews of Anne Waldman by others, arranged chronologically, and interviews of others, which for the most part have Waldman as either interviewer or co- interviewee. These interviews are arranged alphabetically by name of interviewee.

Also included in the Essays, Speeches, and Interviews subseries are "Biographical Sketches" of other authors. (Biographical and autobiographical sketches of Anne Waldman can be found in the Biographical series.) Most of these sketches appear to have been written by Waldman, although some were contributed by the authors themselves. In addition, the researcher will find a Notes grouping, made up of Waldman's loose collected notes, both literary jottings and everyday work lists. Some of the notes are of unknown authorship, although a few appear to have been Reed Bye's.

The Poetry subseries is divided into two sub-subseries, Published Works and Single Titles. Although Waldman's poetry can be found throughout the Writing series--and indeed throughout the entire collection--the bulk of it resides here. Published Works incorporates Waldman's stand-alone or collected works, most but not necessarily all of which have been published. The Published Works sub-subseries begins with an Alphabetical File containing Waldman's shorter works intended for publication. These files are arranged alphabetically by title.

A Collaborations section of collaborations between Waldman and others, and a Translations section, with a small number of works by others which Waldman translated or helped translate into English are also included in the Published Works subseries. The Collaborations section is arranged alphabetically by collaborator. The translation section contains only three works, which are arranged alphabetically according to the original author.

The Published Work subseries also contains three linear feet of separate material for Iovis I, II, and III and Kill or Cure. This material consists generally of original manuscripts (handwritten drafts and typescripts) of single poems, drafts of the whole work, proofs, and a small amount of related correspondence. The Iovis I and Iovis II files strongly reflect Waldman's work process for the creation of these long, fragmentary epic poems. Namely, the Notes Drafts, and Research Material files, which have been left almost as-is, consist of seemingly randomly arranged clippings, correspondence, previously written material, and many different current drafts, merged together. The researcher may find this portion of the collection difficult to use, owing to its haphazard arrangement. Items which seemed of special significance have been flagged or pulled and foldered separately, the "Questions for men for Iovis" being one example. In some cases, the original has been removed and placed elsewhere within the collection. Details are noted in the contents list. Among these items are poems by Waldman's son, Ambrose, and letters written by Anne Waldman's grandfather to his future wife (due to extremely their fragile condition, the originals have been removed and placed in separate storage). The other portions of the Iovis material present a clearer arrangement, consisting as they do of draft and proof copies of the entire work. The Iovis III portion to date is quite small, consisting only of a version of Waldman's journal entries from a trip to Vietnam in 2000.

The material used in Kill or Cure has a clearer organization, although it should be noted that much of the content and order within the "Drafts/Collected Poems" portion remains unclear. It was impossible to ascertain whether some of the pieces included in the original folders labeled "Kill or Cure" were originally intended for the book and not used, or if they became misfiled. Too, some material may be missing, removed by the author from its original location in order to be used for other purposes, such as the creation of Iovis II . In fact, there is considerable overlap between some of the material in Iovis and Kill or Cure, the latter being published in between Iovis I and Iovis II .

Single Titles consists of the many loose poems that were originally scattered throughout the collection and which could not be easily placed within the context of a larger work. They are arranged alphabetically by title or first line. There are several folders of poem fragments as well, found at the end of this grouping. In the case of some of these poems, it has been difficult to ascertain whether they are in fact fragments or are rather complete, untitled poems. In general, when the title of a poem has undergone changes, all of the drafts of that poem have been grouped under what appears to be the latest version of the title. There may, however, be some exceptions to this arrangement.

Contributions to Other Works is a small subseries consisting of pieces which Waldman wrote for publication in larger works by other authors. Both poetry and prose works are represented here.

The Journals and Notebooks series (5 linear feet) consists of more than 110 journals, notebooks, appointment books, and address books kept by Anne Waldman. (For the sake of convenience, all of these items are referred to here as "journals.") A small number of journals kept by others is also represented. The journals offer a diverse array of content, from random jottings and to-do lists, to literary notes and drafts, to intensely personal diaries. In some cases distinct literary pieces have been recorded, and sometimes the line between journal and handmade book is somewhat blurred. There are collaborative works, such as those with Bill Berkson and Reed Bye. Other pieces were clearly written for friends such as Joe Brainard, Jim Carroll, and others.

The Journals and Notebooks series is broken into two subseries, Anne Waldman and Others, representing journals kept by Waldman and journals kept by others. The Anne Waldman subseries is arranged chronologically by decade, from the 1960s through the 1990s. There are many undated journals as well. The Others subseries contains journals by Lewis Warsh (including one that was co-written with Waldman) and journals very likely by Reed Bye. Of note within one of the journals from the 1970s in the Anne Waldman subseries is a drawing of Anne Waldman made by Bob Dylan.

The Editing and Publishing series (approximately 12.5 linear feet) is comprised of Anne Waldman's work in editing and publishing, often as a joint venture with those in her circle. The most important subseries, Small Press and Little Magazine, represents her work with The Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church-in-the-Bowery, Angel Hair, Full Court Press, and Rocky Ledge. For the most part, all of the Small Press and Little Magazine files consist of a mixture of the literary--manuscript contributions, drafts, mockups, proofs--and the administrative--reports, correspondence, sales and expense records, and so forth.

Perhaps the most significant portion of Small Press and Little Magazine, the Poetry Project grouping is divided into General, Adventures in Poetry, The World, and St. Mark's Church. "General" consists of correspondence; administrative material such as reports, notes, and budgets; poster, flyers, and other performance-related material, including speeches and introductions to Poetry Project events. Correspondence is related to the running of the Poetry Project, the newsletter in particular. Much of this correspondence appears to have been managed and kept by Frances Waldman, who edited the Poetry Project Newsletter from 1976 to 1978. There are also loose poems, which were printed and distributed singly, and many issues of the Poetry Project Newsletter (although not a complete run), along with original manuscript submissions for the newsletter.

Adventures in Poetry was a mimeographed literary magazine edited and published at St. Mark's Church by Larry Fagin using Poetry Project resources. A small number of submissions and publications appear here.

The most important division within the Poetry Project grouping are the files relating to The World, the magazine of the Poetry Project, which Waldman directed from 1968 through the late 1970s. Included are what can loosely be labeled "Administrative Material" as well as Submissions. Two files of Administrative Material are topical in nature, including an Author-title Index from 1979. In addition, there are the usual minutes, mailing lists, and the like. Submissions are for the most part arranged alphabetically by author. There are also two folders with material specific to individual issues of The World . Items of unknown authorship are placed at the end of these files. The researcher may find the aforementioned Author-title Index of some assistance in identifying these submissions.

"St. Mark's Church" refers to items which are church-specific; that is, related to St. Mark's as a religious institution or physical entity rather than to the Poetry Project: Such concerns as building preservation and restoration, youth projects, and church services are covered. Much of this material appears to have been maintained by Frances Waldman, including but not limited to files which are labeled as hers.

The Angel Hair files consist of material from Angel Hair Books and Angel Hair magazine, both of which Waldman co-founded and co-edited with Lewis Warsh. Press and magazine materials are commingled. Angel Hair is divided into Catalogues, Administrative Material, Proofs, and Submissions.

Full Court Press, which Waldman started with Ron Padgett and Joan Simon, was dedicated to publishing quality editions of out-of-print works. The volume of material in this collection is quite slim, consisting of only one folder.

Rocky Ledge refers to the mimeographed magazine, Rocky Ledge, which Waldman started with Reed Bye in Boulder. It was published in eight issues from 1978 to 1981. Some books were also published through Rocky Ledge Cottage Editions. There is a folder of general Administrative Material and another slim folder of manuscripts published by Rocky Ledge Cottage Editions. In keeping with the original organization of the material, the rest of the files are arranged by the individual issue of Rocky Ledge , with administrative materials mixed in with each issue of the magazine. Types of material found in the Rocky Ledge files include draft or mockup versions of the magazine; manuscript submissions; correspondence; cover art, both originals and facsimiles; receipts; and editors' notes. In some cases, the original manuscript submissions appear to have been used in the creation of the draft versions of the magazine. A separate division deals with submissions that were either not used in Rocky Ledge, may not have been intended for use in Rocky Ledge in the first place, or are unidentified.

Also included is a small amount of material labeled "Cherry Valley." Waldman summered in this small New York town in the late 1970s, Waldman's family and Allen Ginsberg maintained houses there for a time, and some work produced by Waldman and her circle was published by "Cherry Valley Editions." However, the exact nature and extent of literary activity from this period and location is unclear, and extant files in this collection are unrevealing.

The rest of the Editing and Publishing is divided along the lines of the individual book titles which Waldman edited or co-edited: The Beat Book, Nice to See You, Out of This World, Talking Poetics, and Disembodied Poetics.

The Beat Book files consist of some correspondence and, primarily, a draft version and a proof version of the work. Nice to See You, which is a tribute to poet Ted Berrigan, consists mainly of submissions by friends of Berrigan's. There are also files of background material, notes, a small number of photographs, correspondence, a draft, proofs, and publicity and reviews. Out of This World is an anthology of work from The Poetry Project. The Out of This World files consists of correspondence (dealing mainly with publishing permissions), early versions of the preface and introduction, drafts, and proofs.

Both Talking Poetics and Disembodied Poetics are anthologies of lectures delivered at Naropa University by Writing and Poetics Department faculty and visiting poets. These files are comprised mainly of transcripts of these lectures; manuscript reworkings and revisions by the authors; correspondence between authors, editors, and publishers; and various drafts of the whole work. In some cases, the name referenced in the correspondence file is the subject of the correspondence rather than its author. Administrative material is also included.

In the Talking Poetics files, the Drafts and Proofs section is divided into Early Work and Complete Drafts. Much of the Early Work section is fragmentary in nature, in particular, the Early Drafts material. Although at some time all of the individual pieces of Early Drafts were collated and paginated, much is missing or has been placed elsewhere. The existing pieces are now arranged alphabetically by author. Particularly noteworthy in this section is a handwritten John Cage score, a part of his work Lecture IV. Complete Drafts are arranged by page number.

The Disembodied Poetics files are arranged in a similar fashion, with individual pieces placed in the Early Contributions and Ideas and Early Drafts portions and later, more complete drafts arranged in or nearly in book order. It should be noted that the designations of the drafts as "A," "B," and "C" were assigned during processing and do not necessarily reflect chronological order. The order within each draft follows the table of contents for that draft, none of the drafts being paginated as a whole.

The subseries, General Publishing, consists of miscellaneous contracts, proposals, copyright application material, and financial material covering royalties, honoraria, book sales, and so on. The Unpublished material subseries consists mainly of miscellaneous pieces of writing that could be part of books that are published or unpublished or drafts of works with an unknown title.

The Naropa series (8 linear feet) consists of material related to Waldman's involvement with the Naropa Institute, now Naropa University, in Boulder, Colorado. It is comprised of the following subseries: Course Material, Administrative Material, Conferences and Panels, Publications, Printed Material, Other Teaching Activities, and Personal.

Course Material is divided into the following sub-subseries: Anne Waldman, Others, and Summer Writing Program. Anne Waldman course material is arranged chronologically and topically and contains many sourcebooks or bound copies of readings for her classes. Course material of others is arranged primarily chronologically, as is, for the most part, material from the Summer Writing Program. The Summer Faculty and Visiting Poets folder under Course Material includes contracts, correspondence and resumes from guest lecturers such as Amiri, Baraka, Ted Berrigan, Diane Di Prima, Tom Clark, Robert Creeley, Kenward Elmslie, Joy Harjo and Harry Smith and is organized alphabetically. Administrative Material is divided into General, Writing and Poetics Department, and Summer Writing Program. Within all levels of the Administrative Series can be found correspondence which includes emails, memos, minutes and reports, planning material, notes, etc. "Early Planning Material" within the Writing and Poetics Department files includes documents penned by Anne Waldman and Allen Ginsberg which formulate aspects of the founding of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Also included in the Writing and Poetics files are departmental newsletters. Student and instructor evaluations also appear. Evaluation files, barring those of Anne Waldman, are closed due to privacy legislation and concerns.

Conferences and Panels consists of notes for talks given at Naropa along with transcripts and schedules. Speeches and Interviews covers those speeches and interview given at Naropa, although there may be some overlap with material in the Writing series. Speeches are arranged chronologically. "A Declaration of Interdependence," although grouped with Speeches, is not a speech per se, but rather a protest document mirroring in structure the Declaration of Independence. It was penned by multiple authors, including many Naropa faculty members as well as other poets and activists. Interviews are listed alphabetically by interviewee.

Publications consist of Campus Periodicals (student newsletters and literary magazines); Class Publications, including those of the Summer Writing Program; and a small number of works by faculty members. Printed Material consists of Catalogs and Brochures; Posters, Flyers, and Programs; and Clippings. Arrangement at the folder level is chronological. Additional class publications can be found within the Course Material subseries.

In addition to her role at Naropa, Waldman has taught at several other institutions. These activities are reflected in the Other Teaching Activities subseries, which includes work at the Schule für Dichtung in Vienna and the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey, among other institutions. Because the bulk of Waldman's teaching activities is tied up with Naropa, these files are included within the Naropa series. Material for each institution is arranged chronologically.

The final subseries of the Naropa series is Personal, which includes ephemera, correspondence, topical files, contracts, and notes. Correspondence is both incoming and outgoing and consists of both Naropa-related 'official' correspondence that is addressed solely to Waldman and correspondence that is personal in nature but which refers to Naropa (here, there will naturally be some overlap with Waldman's correspondence in the Correspondence and Name file series). Material within folders is arranged chronologically.

The Other Activities series is comprised of 1 linear foot of material, and documents Waldman's activities outside of writing and publishing. The series includes material related to conferences and festivals that Waldman attended or participated in, as well as material related to Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue Tour, various video and audio recording projects, and attempts to sell Waldman's archive, or portions of it. The series also includes a significant amount of material documenting Waldman's involvement in social protest issues.

The Personal series is a topical file consisting of 1.5 linear feet of material not primarily related to Waldman's writing or professional activities. Material documenting Waldman's interest in Buddhism and her 1967 wedding to Lewis Warsh can be found in the series. Of particular note is a collection of memorabilia, including material from Waldman's travels, and various playbills, museum programs and ticket stubs. Legal and financial records, as well as various and unidentified notes, jottings and telephone messages, are also included in this series.

The Early Years series contains 2 linear feet of material documenting Waldman's school years, as well as her early interests in writing, acting and drama. The series includes material from Waldman's elementary school, middle school, high school and college years. Early writings can be found in each of the Pre-High School, Friends Seminary and Bennington College subseries, as well as the Early and Unidentified Writings subseries. Highlights include childhood and family newsletters titled "Our Life and Times" and "The Penguin News," school publications in which Waldman was first published, production material from Waldman's high school newspaper (of which she was editor), and manuscripts and typescripts of early poems. The Friends Seminary and Bennington College subseries contain class notes and papers, a high school report card, college grade reports and other school-related material. The Bennington College subseries also includes correspondence and notes from Howard Nemerov and other professors.

The Acting and Theater subseries includes material from various productions, theater companies and organizations with which Waldman was involved in the 1950s and 1960s. The Correspondence subseries consists primarily of correspondence from Waldman's middle school and high school friends, but also includes a folder of notes that appear to be notes passed in class. This folder also includes school love poems that appear to have been written for Waldman. The Early and Unidentified Writing subseries consists primarily of unidentified or undated material that could not filed with the other subseries.

The Family series (approximately 4 linear feet and 1 oversize box) includes material related to Waldman's mother, father, brother, son and other relatives.

The bulk of the series is comprised of material created by, or related to Waldman's mother, Frances Waldman. The Frances Waldman subseries includes 1.5 linear feet of correspondence between Waldman and her mother, spanning the years 1958-1981. Several folders of Frances Waldman's correspondence with other people, including many New York poets and writers, can also be found in the subseries.

The subseries also includes several folders of Frances Waldman's manuscripts, translations and miscellaneous material. Although the majority of the material related to other family members is correspondence, manuscripts and other material can also be found in the series. Of special note are the manuscripts found with the Ambrose Bye material, which include some poems written with or transcribed by Anne Waldman.

The Handmade Books series (3 linear feet) is comprised of one-of-a-kind books made by Waldman and her friends. Often they were presented as gifts on special occasions. They are divided into three subseries: Anne Waldman, representing books by Waldman; Collaborations, representing collaborations between Waldman and others; and Others, that is, works by others.

Included in Others are books printed at Naropa University either through a print workshop or class, or through the school's Kavyayantra Press. Within the Waldman subseries, books are listed alphabetically by title, with untitled books at the back. Collaborations, all of which have Waldman as a coauthor, are arranged alphabetically by the collaborator's last name, as are works in the Others subseries.

Many of the handmade books bear inscriptions indicating maker, recipient, date, and other information, which has not been included in the contents listing. Included in the Handmade Books series are some limited edition volumes, such as those produced by Waldman's Erudite Fangs Press.

The Printed Material series (4 linear feet, 1 oversize box, and 1 portfolio) encompasses the subseries Broadsides; Posters, Flyers, and Programs; and Clippings. Broadsides are broken down into those by Anne Waldman, Collaborations (between Waldman and others), and Others--that is, works by others. Within these divisions, work is arranged alphabetically, first by author, then by title. Also included in Broadsides are postcards and bookmarks printed by various small presses. Oversize broadsides are housed separately.

Material in the Posters, Flyers, and Programs subseries is for the most part grouped chronologically. Separate, topical divisions have been made for undated material. Small press book catalogs and newsletters are included as separate divisions. Oversize posters are housed separately. The section labeled "Newsletters" consists of should really be viewed as a set of clippings, consisting as it does of single issues of various newsletters and some journals, most of which appear to have been saved for particular articles.

Clippings are arranged in rough chronological order by decade, where date is known. The vast majority of the clippings pertain to Waldman and her circle, although some clippings reflect topical interests. Some of these appear to have been saved by Waldman's mother, Frances LeFevre Waldman. In some cases, whole publications have been saved, either due to their content or to their rare or unusual nature.

Art (1 linear foot, 10 oversize boxes, and 1 portfolio) is made up of artworks by Waldman and her family and friends, as well as various pieces she has collected over the years. Work in many different media exists, including prints, paintings, sketches, drawings, and collages. Much of Waldman's work consists of prints done while a student at Bennington College. There are also exquisite corpses (collaboratively created pictures and writings, done in-the-round) by Anne Waldman, Reed Bye, and Ambrose Bye. According to Waldman, this was a frequent after-dinner pastime when Ambrose was young, and friends and guests, such as Bobbie Louise Hawkins, were invited to participate.

Cover Art includes "Collaborations," which consist of collaborative book-length works and not just cover art per se. Additional cover art may be found in the among the Rocky Ledge files within the Editing and Publishing series. Noteworthy among the artists represented are George Schneeman and Joe Brainard.

The Photographs, Slides and Negatives series consists of approximately 2.5 linear feet of photographic materials documenting a variety of subjects, including Waldman's childhood and school years, her large circle of friends and colleagues, and her publishing and performance activities.

The Personal subseries contains personal and informal photographs of Waldman and others. Photographs in the "Family and childhood" folder include photographs of Waldman as a child, as well as other family members. The high school and college photographs include several photographs of Waldman as a young actress. The bulk of the Personal subseries consists of the "Friends and colleagues" photographs. These photographs include images of many prominent late twentieth century poets, Waldman's husbands and significant others, and other friends and colleagues. Waldman herself is pictured in some of the friends and colleagues photographs.

One of the strengths of the Professional subseries is the large amount of photographs of Waldman performing. The performance photographs, which date from the late 1960s to mid 1990s, sometimes include images of other poets and performers. Also included are several folders of portraits and publicity photographs, photographs created for various book and publishing projects, photographs of Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue Tour, and photographs documenting Waldman's activities at Naropa University and the St. Marks Poetry Project. The St. Mark's photographs include images of New York School and other poets performing at the church. The Professional subseries also includes several photographs taken by photographer, poet, and filmmaker Gerard Malanga. Although Malanga photographs can be found within several of the groupings in the Professional subseries, the majority can be found within the portraits grouping. A Malanga portrait of Waldman and her mother, Frances, has been filed with the family photographs.

The Outsize subseries consists of photographs too large to be housed with the rest of the photograph series. The highlights of the outsize photographs include two photographs taken by Allen Ginsberg which include handwritten captions by Ginsberg.

The Albums and Scrapbooks subseries complements the friends and colleagues photographs found in the Personal subseries. In addition to photographs documenting Waldman's travels in Greece and Egypt in the early sixties, the albums contain numerous photographs of Waldman and her circle in the late sixties and early seventies. Photographs of Lewis Warsh, Michael Brownstein, Joe Brainard, Ron Padgett, Ted Berrigan, Tom Clark, Bill Berkson, and others can all be found in the albums. The albums have been arranged chronologically.

The Slides and Negatives subseries consists primarily of miscellaneous and unidentified slides and negatives. The subseries does contain a few slides of Waldman performing.

The researcher should note that a small number of photographs sent to Waldman by specific correspondents can be found within the Correspondence and Name File series.

The Audiovisual Series has been divided into four subseries: Sound Recordings, Video Tapes, DVDs, and Digital Files. The series provides a unique perspective on Waldman's activities, and thus complements and expands the manuscript and photographic holdings. Including recordings of readings, lectures, and interviews given by Waldman and others, the series strongly represents the sounds and voices of late 20th century American poetry.

The Sound Recordings subseries has been organized according to format, including LPs and 45s, Compact Discs, Reels, and Audio Cassettes. In order to facilitate access, each sound recording has been numbered. Recordings are numbered sequentially within each subseries. Titles indicated in quotation marks in the finding aid are quoted directly from the labels of the recordings. In a few cases, particularly within the Commercial Recordings grouping, quotation marks are also used to indicate the title of a poem or work.

The LPs and 45s, Compact Discs, and Reels represent a relatively small part of the subseries. The LPs and 45s include the 1977 LP "John Giorno and Anne Waldman," as well as Waldman's "Uh-Oh Plutonium" 45, and a "voice-o-graph" recording of Waldman and Michael Brownstein. The Compact Discs subseries consists of commercial recordings of Waldman, including a live 1991 performance in Amsterdam which includes an accompanying booklet of poems.

Reels include recordings related to a variety of subjects. Included are Waldman performances at radio stations and elsewhere, television shows related to poetry, a commercial recording of Fast Speaking Woman , and a recording of Waldman while acting. To facilitate access, the recordings in this group have been transferred onto recordable compact discs. The numbering and labeling of the compact discs corresponds to the numbering of the reels.

The largest part of the subseries is comprised of Cassettes, which include readings and lectures by Waldman and other poets, interviews, radio broadcasts featuring Waldman, commercial recordings, Waldman's recording projects, and other miscellaneous recordings. Spanning the years 1971-2002, the readings include recordings of Waldman reading with Ted Berrigan, Allen Ginsberg, Diane di Prima, Gary Snyder and others. In addition, there are several recordings of readings not by Anne Waldman, including performances by Ginsberg, John Ashbery, Robert Creeley, Philip Whalen and others. Lectures by Waldman at Naropa Institute and in other settings, and lectures by William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Ted Berrigan, Carl Rakosi, and Peter Orlovsky are included.

Interviews and conversations represent the strongest part of the series. In addition to an interview of Waldman conducted by Larry Fagin, tapes of interviews of Joe Brainard, Edwin Denby, Diane di Prima, Robert Duncan, Allen Ginsberg, and Philip Whalen are included, many conducted by Waldman. There are two recordings of "conversations," one with Waldman, Clark Coolidge, Lewis MacAdams, and others, and one with Waldman, Tom Clark, Lewis Warsh, Lewis MacAdams, and Philip Whalen. Of note is a cassette recording of Allen Ginsberg orally composing the introduction to Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. To facilitate access, the cassette recordings have been transferred onto recordable compact discs. The numbering and labeling of the compact discs corresponds to the numbering of the cassette tapes.

Video recordings consists of 42 VHS videocassettes, one 8mm film reel and ten DVDs. The readings, performances and lectures grouping includes performances from 1990 to 1998 and is the primary strength of the subseries. In addition to Waldman's performances, the tapes include readings by Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Michael McClure, Ed Sanders and others. Most of the tapes in the programs and television shows grouping were produced commercially or for television shows. The highlight of the grouping is a tape which includes seven episodes of "Word One," a Boulder, Colorado cable access television show hosted by Waldman, which includes performances by Allen Ginsberg, Kenward Elmslie and other poets. The programs and television shows grouping also includes a tape of "poetry videos" from the Manhattan Poetry Video Project, including music videos of Waldman's "Uh-Oh Plutonium," Allen Ginsberg's "Father Death Blues," and Bob Holman's "Rapp It Up." The personal and miscellaneous grouping includes a videotape copy of a home movie of Waldman, Lewis Warsh, Ted Berrigan and others. DVD copies of the first 27 videotapes and the film reel in the subseries (WALDVID-1 to WALDVID-27) are available for viewing in the reading room of the Special Collections Library, with advance notice for retrieval and setup. The ten original DVDs in the subseries are labeled with the prefix WALDDVD- and consist mainly of Anne Waldman poetry readings, and collaborative events such as Transatlantic Howl! A Dedication to Allen Ginsberg, a multivenue event featuring poetry readings and poetic theatre pieces celebrating Ginsberg's poem Howl.

The Digital Files subseries includes backups of email correspondence, files on Waldman's poems and books, such as parts I and II of the Iovis Trilogy and the anthology Civil Disobediences, and interviews. Most of these materials are stored on floppy disks and have not been transferred to viewable digital media.

Collection

Bacon family papers, 1805-1888

0.75 linear feet

The Bacon family papers contain correspondence, financial documents, and other material related to Delia Bacon, her siblings, her niece Katharine Bacon, and to other members of her family.

The Bacon family papers contain correspondence, financial documents, and other material related to Delia Bacon and to other members of her family. The Correspondence series, which comprises the bulk of the collection, contains several distinct groups of items; the first of these is a series of letters to Catharine Terry of Hartford, Connecticut, from her husband Nathaniel, composed between 1805 and 1818. A member of the United States House of Representatives, Nathaniel frequently wrote to her about his life in Washington, D. C., and though he occasionally discussed political affairs, the majority of his correspondence concentrated on news of his life and of his business affairs. The second group of letters consists of Delia Bacon's correspondence (1841-1853), much of which relates directly to the quarrel between Delia, her brother Leonard, and Alexander MacWhorter. During this period, Catharine Beecher composed 26 letters, most of which were letters of support to Delia, as the very public scandal took a toll on the latter's reputation. Many of the other correspondents offered similar sentiments, including Elizabeth P. Peabody, who wrote 10 letters. Among the undated Delia Bacon material is a letter in which she wrote a detailed self-defense. The third group of letters (1870-1888) relates primarily to Leonard's daughter Katharine, including a significant amount of material written just prior to her February 1872 wedding. Later items addressed to Katharine pertain to family news and updates from friends, and the collection also includes several letters from Katharine to her children, written in the 1880s. In addition to these three main groups of letters, the series also holds correspondence related to other members of the extended Bacon family.

The Bills and receipts series is comprised primarily of material directly related to Delia Bacon; among these are several receipts for printing circulars and for purchasing advertising in different publications. The collection's Miscellaneous material belonged to Delia Bacon, and includes several advertisements related to Bacon's historical lectures, manuscript essay drafts and notes about the MacWhorter scandal and her later interest in Shakespeare, poetry, a program from Vassar College's 1882 Class Day, and a notebook regarding her lectures.

Collection

Clarke family papers, 1823-1929 (majority within 1851-1912)

3 linear feet

This collection is made up of correspondence, diaries, writings, documents, and other items related to the Clarke family of Gilmanton and Manchester, New Hampshire. The materials concern the Civil War, life in 19th-century New Hampshire, education, and other subjects.

This collection contains correspondence, diaries, writings, documents, and other items related to the Clarke family of Gilmanton and Manchester, New Hampshire.

The Correspondence series (approximately 920 items) comprises the bulk of the collection. Most of the correspondence written between the 1850s and the early 1870s is made up of letters between and addressed to William Cogswell Clarke, Anna Maria Greely Clarke, and their three eldest children: Stephen Greely Clarke and his wife, Lydia Mason Wight Clarke; Anna Norton Clarke and her husband, Robert M. Appleton; and Julia Cogswell Clarke. A few letters by Mary Ann Wight are also present. Letter enclosures include a lock of hair, plants, cartes-de-visite, and newspaper clippings.

The Clarke family's personal correspondence focuses primarily on life in and news of Gilmanton and Manchester, New Hampshire throughout the 19th century. Writers discussed religious beliefs and activities; romantic relationships, courtship, and marriage; births and deaths; social activities; teaching and education; politics; and other subjects. During the Civil War, some writers shared news of battles, regiments, casualties, and the general progress of the war.

After 1871, many items are incoming and outgoing letters between and addressed to Julia C. Clarke, her sister Anna, and their mother. Some of Julia's letters pertain to her life in Framingham, Massachusetts, while Anna Clarke Appleton and Anna Greely Clarke provided news from Lake Village, New Hampshire, and Manchester, New Hampshire. During the 1880s, Julia wrote a series of letters to William H. Ladd, discussing newspaper advertising (particularly with regard to schools); her experiences in Lake Village, Kents Hill (Maine), and Boston, where she worked for the Chauncy Hall School; and advice for Ladd's upcoming visit to Europe. Groups of enclosed newspaper clippings contain advertisements for educational institutions. Other late personal letters to members of the Clarke family concern travel in Asia, estate administration, and finances.

Additional correspondence from the 1870s to the 1910s includes a large number of business letters, including many related to Stephen G. Clarke's legal career. Other groups of correspondence include letters to Edward Reilly of San Francisco, California, about mining concerns in Arizona and New Mexico; to Lafayette H. De Friese of New York City about the timber industry and shipments of logs; and to a man named "Bagley" of New York City. Other personal correspondence includes love letters from "Dolph" to "Sadie" and letters related to O. F. Bryant, who taught at or attended Chauncy Hall School. New York City lawyer Ernest G. Stevens received several business letters in the early 1910s.

The Diaries and Journals series consists of 5 items. Anna Maria Greely (later Clarke) kept 2 diaries from October 12, 1828-June 19, 1829, and June 26, [1872]-September 21, 1872. Her entries, which were written mostly on loose scraps of paper, concern daily life, social calls, and activities with family members and acquaintances. The later diary contains frequent mentions of Clarke's children. The remaining items concern an unidentified author's Bible readings and Christian beliefs (September 12, 1858-April 24, 1859); "Mrs. Robinson's" desire to write a journal for the benefit of her 7-year-old daughter Kitty, who required instruction in housekeeping (July 1, 1868); and Emma F. Moore's "Two Days on the Concord River," describing her travels with a companion (undated).

The Writings series is comprised of essays (15 items), published articles (2 items), letters to the editor (6 items), drafts (2 items), rejected submissions (9 items), "A Reading of the Will: A Farce" (1 item), "Seminal Weakness" (1 item), poems (30 items), and a speech. The essays, by Stephen G. Clarke, Lydia M. Wight, and Anna Greely Clarke, concern topics such as politics and history, morality and religion, English and Latin grammar, teaching and education, and horse breeding. The rejected submissions are primarily poetry, including one about African Americans. "The Reading of the Will" is a farce and "Seminal Weakness" is a lengthy essay on the male reproductive system. Many of the poems concern religion and nature. The 54-page speech is a presidential address delivered by Dr. Nahum Wight before the New Hampshire Medical Society. He discussed the society's history and goals, medical history and education, and his own medical career.

The School Papers series contains Latin Exercises (5 items), Academic Notes (19 items), Debates (2 items), and items related to the Chauncey Hall School (21 items). The academic notes and debates largely pertain to Stephen G. Clarke's studies, including items regarding animal classification and birds. One lengthy debate considered whether men were influenced more by women or money. The Chauncy Hall School subseries consists of newspaper advertisements, several copies of a printed advertisement, and correspondence from recipients of a circular and from managers at the Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph and the Chicago Tribune. One item is an invitation to the school's "Promotion Day," held on June 12, 1894.

The Documents series is divided into two subseries. Financial Documents (10 items), most of which concern Stephen G. Clarke, include accounts, receipts, a promissory note, and bank checks. One document between Willard B. Farwell and the American Machine Gun Company concerns the ownership of Farwell's inventions and patents. Printed Documents (11 items) include certificates regarding Stephen G. Clarke's attendance at Harvard University (July 16, 1855) and Josephine Evarts's license to practice medicine in Connecticut (April 1, 1929), documents regarding the activities of the American Folklore Society and the Wednesday Club (1892 and undated), and descriptions of an invention, the Hussey Motor Battery, by Willard B. Farwell (undated). A price list for advertisements in the Chicago Tribune and a sign regarding the treatment of animals in a scientific laboratory are also present.

Newspaper Clippings (12 items) include obituaries for William C. Clarke, articles about the Clarke family, advice for young writers, advertisements, and poetry.

The Photographs series (2 items) contains a portrait of an unidentified man, likely taken around the 1860s or 1870s, and a picture of a home and its large front garden. Both prints are mounted on large cards.

The Genealogy series consists of family trees written into a bound volume of blank genealogical tables that belonged to Julia C. Clarke. The tables concern ancestors of Julia C. Clarke and their families; some lineages are traced back as far as the 1600s. Many of the pages have cut-out sections to coordinate records across different trees and pages.

Collection

David Bates Douglass papers, 1812-1873

1,191 items

The David Bates Douglass Papers contain 1,191 letters, documents, and manuscripts relating to many aspects of Douglass's family and professional life between approximately 1812 and 1873. The collection is broad, encompassing incoming letters from scientific and military associates of Douglass, with drafts and retained copies of some his responses; long love letters to his future wife, Ann Ellicott (later Douglass); letters between Ann and Douglass; letters between Ann, Douglass, and the children; correspondence to and from a larger extended family; and several letters pertaining to the scandal at Kenyon College. Douglass's interests in internal improvements, natural history, systems and theories of academic scientific exchange, the education of his daughters and sons, the complex and numerous relationships and family connections through which early nineteenth-century American communities were built, and the Military Academy at West Point are very well-documented.

The David Bates Douglass Papers contain 1,191 letters, documents, and manuscripts relating to many aspects of Douglass's family and professional life between approximately 1812 and 1873. The collection is broad, encompassing incoming letters from scientific and military associates of Douglass, with drafts and retained copies of some his responses; long love letters to his future wife, Ann Ellicott (later Douglass); letters between Ann and Douglass; letters between Ann, Douglass, and the children; correspondence to and from a larger extended family; and several letters pertaining to the scandal at Kenyon College. Douglass's interests in internal improvements, natural history, systems and theories of academic scientific exchange, the education of his daughters and sons, the complex and numerous relationships and family connections through which early nineteenth-century American communities were built, and the Military Academy at West Point are very well-documented.

The David Bates Douglass Papers include materials pertinent to the War of 1812 and British-American relations in the New Nation period (1789-1830). Many of the early letters (1812-1814) include Douglass's own accounts of the Siege of Fort Erie, the Battle of Lundy's Lane, the daily experiences of soldiers as they marched, the lack of provisions so frequently a problem in the Napoleonic Era, and the efforts to fortify various parts of Fort Erie during and after the end of the war. Several copies of Douglass's drafts of a memorial of the War of 1812, written later in his life, provide additional context to his published account, The Campaign of 1814 (Wales: Cromlech Press, 1958). A particularly notable part of the collection is the volume, Reminiscences of the War of 1812 -- a set of Douglass's lectures, copied letters, and copied war orders [written in pen and ink in what appears to be Andrew Douglass's hand]. Despite Douglass's service in the war, his letters show the still-interconnected nature of British and American people in this period, both in matters such as creating borders, but also in religious and intellectual life. Charles, Douglass's eldest son, went to Seminary at Oxford, served in the Anglican Church, and wrote and published in England. Douglass himself worked with British engineers on the U. S. Canada boundary project and corresponded with other scientists and intellectuals from England, sharing information, specimens, and equipment.

Douglass's papers showcase relationships in the development of intellectual, religious, and scientific communities in New Nation America. Douglass and his associates were instrumental in the foundation and growth of several lyceums, thus playing a role in public scientific education, and they were particularly avid in promoting the field of mineralogy. Thirty-six letters (1820-1825) in the collection detail Douglass' participation in the Lewis Cass Expedition of 1820, including its planning, findings, and importance to larger political issues of the time. Twenty-four letters (1820 -1825) from Cass include observations on Native Americans and on the natural history of the region. Valuable letters from Torrey (1820-1823), Barnes (1821-1823), Schoolcraft (1824), and Silliman (1820-1821) relate to the planning of the expedition and to the research carried out by its participants. Along with the correspondence concerning the establishment of lyceums and the exchange of specimens, the letters help to highlight certain communities engaged in early nineteenth-century networks of scientific communication in the U.S. Douglass also corresponded with other intellectuals of the time, including the geologist Mary Griffith (1821-1825) and the mineralogist Parker Cleaveland (1828). The collection also includes notes and correspondence regarding Douglass's work on the U.S.-Canadian boundary in Lake Erie (1819), his survey and assessment of New England coastal defenses (1815-1820), the construction of the Pennsylvania Canal (1824), his work on the Morris Canal (1829), discussions of linking the Ohio River and the Chesapeake, and his much-celebrated work on the Greenwood Cemetery (1839).

The collection contains materials pertinent to scholars of family, gender, and/or class in nineteenth-century America. The majority of the collection is tied together through the correspondence of Douglass and his family. Roughly 40 early letters from Douglass to Ann (1813-1815) show common epistolary courtship practices, such as choosing pen names from popular romantic literature, poetry, or plays, copying poems or excerpts from books, and Douglass's own expressions of romantic love. Ann's letters (105 of them, ranging from 1826 to 1849) display the wide range of women's responsibilities to the ever-changing nineteenth-century household, showing especially women's role in connecting the family to various social communities. Glimpses into early childhood education can be seen throughout this collection, first under Ann's stewardship and Douglass's long distance instruction through letter-writing, and later in the children's letters about their experiences of girls' and boys' boarding schools in New Jersey, New York, and Ohio. In one example (February 28, 1831), Douglass wrote to Andrew, giving him advice on how to pursue an education, but also on how to behave in virtuous ways. In another example (March 4, 1831), Andrew told his father about mean boys who bullied him. Letters from Charles and Andrew chronicle as well some of their experiences of higher education at Kenyon College. The Douglass family's letters provide evidence for examinations into the gender expectations placed on girls and boys, women and men, and the ways that those expectations changed over time. Many letters also provide material for examining family economies, revealing a family striving for middle class comforts while living with indebtedness, the constantly changing financial states of early nineteenth-century American families, and the reliance upon extended kinship networks to avoid the perilous position of penury. For example, in a letter from Ann, Ellen, and Mary to Douglass (October 18, 1844) Ellen discussed her desire to have more schooling, which they cannot afford, while Ann worried over providing winter clothing for all of the smaller children.

The Douglass Papers also concern Native American life in different parts of the U. S. and Black life in northern communities. For example, John Bliss wrote several letters to Douglass (1820-1834) discussing negotiations with the Sioux and Chippewa in Missouri. In a few letters to Ann during his survey of Lake Erie, and in his bundles of notes (1819), Douglass gave descriptions of his interactions with Native American tribes in upper Michigan. In another, Douglass tried to obtain dictionaries of Native American languages so that he could better communicate with people from Native American tribes. Cass's letters (1820) also give information regarding his observations of Native American tribes in the Detroit area. Sarah Douglass described a Black traveling preacher who gave sermons to the girls at her boarding school in New York and Ann told Douglass about a Black medicine woman who used her nursing skills to heal a group of people in New York during an outbreak of severe disease, another frequent topic displayed throughout the collection. In many ways, the everyday nature of the David Bates Douglass papers, filled with clothing orders, professions of familial love, the financial troubles of a growing family, the religious experiences and affiliations of middle class men and women, and letters from children practicing their penmanship makes this collection invaluable to the study of early U. S. history.

In addition to this finding aid, the Clements Library has created two other research aids: a Correspondent Inventory and a Chronological Inventory.

Collection

David Cope Papers, 1972-2013 (majority within 1980-2013)

22.0 Linear Feet — 21 record center boxes and 1 oversize flat box, approximately 22 linear feet.

David Cope is a poet in the Objectivist tradition and the founder of Nada Press, a small press which publishes the literary magazine Big Scream and other poetry. Cope, a University of Michigan graduate and lifelong Michigan resident, teaches literature and writing at Grand Rapids Community College and Western Michigan University. The collection documents Cope's writing, editing, and to some extent teaching and other spheres of Cope's life, through correspondence, manuscripts, notes, printed material, photographs, and videotapes.

David Cope made his first donation of papers to the Special Collections Library in 1987. Since then he has continued to make frequent contributions. The David Cope Papers cover Cope's writing and correspondence from the 1970s to the present, as well as his editing and teaching activities. In addition to offering insight into Cope's work, the collection details some of the activities and thoughts of friends and fellow writers and poets; in particular, Jim Cohn, Antler, and Jeff Poniewaz. Not currently well-documented are the more personal aspects of Cope's life--especially his family life--except for those details made available through his writings and correspondence.

The David Cope Papers are divided into nine series: the Correspondence and Name File, Writing and Editing, Teaching, Other Activities, Printed Material, Personal, Photographs, Audiovisual, and Oversize Material. Books and serial publications (periodicals) from Cope's library have been removed from the collection. They have been cataloged individually and are shelved by call number in the Special Collections Library. They can be located using Mirlyn, the University of Michigan's Library Catalog.

Collection

Edward Everett, Washington University Inauguration address, 1857, 1945

3 items

This collection contains a manuscript draft and a contemporary printed copy of an address that Edward Everett delivered during the inauguration ceremonies for Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, in April 1857. Also included is an informational pamphlet for freshmen entering Washington University in 1945, containing information on the university's inauguration, among other subjects.

This collection contains 3 items pertaining to an address delivered by Edward Everett during the inauguration ceremonies for Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, on April 23, 1857. The first item is a manuscript draft of "An Address Delivered at St. Louis on the 22d April 1857, at the Inauguration of Washington University of the State of Missouri, by Edward Everett" (49 pages). The draft differs slightly from published versions and contains additions and excisions. Everett discussed the history of European exploration of and settlement in North America, Native American culture, and the history and importance of education. Defending higher education, Everett described the usefulness of three branches of study: language and communication, higher mathematics, and the "philosophy of the mind" (metaphysics).

The collection also contains a printed pamphlet of the proceedings of the inauguration ceremonies, including a version of Everett's speech (Inauguration of Washington University at Saint Louis, Missouri. April 23, 1857. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1857), and a Freshman Bible of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (Volume 37. Washington University Freshman Orientation Committee: 1945). The Freshman Bible contains information about the university and a brief description of Everett's remarks.

Collection

Gabriel-Marie-Théodore-Joseph d'Hédouville collection, 1798

17 items

The Gabriel-Marie-Théodore-Joseph d'Hédouville Collection is made up of 17 incoming and outgoing letters, drafts, and documents pertinent to d'Hédouville's time as French commissioner to Saint-Domingue. Dating between January 26 and December 18, 1798, d'Hédouville's communicated with Governor-General Toussaint Louverture, André Rigaud, Spanish Governor of Santo Domingo Joaquín García, and others. The manuscripts pertain to military, naval, and political affairs in Revolutionary Haiti; a still stolen from physician "Citoyen Ferrié" and spirited away to Santo Domingo; and French Royalists in exile in Guadeloupe.

The Gabriel-Marie-Théodore-Joseph d'Hédouville Collection is made up of 17 incoming and outgoing letters, drafts, and documents pertinent to d'Hédouville's time as French commissioner to Saint-Domingue. Dating between January 26 and December 18, 1798, d'Hédouville communicated with Governor-General Toussaint Louverture, André Rigaud, Spanish Governor of Santo Domingo Joaquín García, and others. The manuscripts pertain to military, naval, and political affairs in Revolutionary Haiti; a still stolen from physician "Citoyen Ferrié" and spirited away to Santo Domingo; and French patriots in exile in Guadeloupe.

Please see the box and folder listing below for details about each item in the collection.

Collection

George T. and Harriet Stevens papers, 1850-1920

5.5 linear feet

The collection consists of correspondence, primarily between George T. Stevens and Harriet W. Stevens of Essex County, New York , as well as documents, writings, a scrapbook, printed materials, and realia reflecting the Civil War service of surgeon George T. Stevens of the 77th Regiment N.Y. Volunteers, Harriet W. Stevens' experiences on the home front, and George T. Stevens' post-Civil War medical career in Albany and New York City, New York.

The collection consists of correspondence, primarily between George T. Stevens and Harriet W. Stevens of Essex County, New York, as well as documents, writings, a scrapbook, printed materials, and realia reflecting the Civil War service of surgeon George T. Stevens of the 77th Regiment N.Y. Volunteers, Harriet W. Stevens' experiences on the home front, and George T. Stevens' post-Civil War medical career in Albany and New York City, New York.

The Correspondence Series is divided into two sub-series. The Chronological Correspondence Sub-Series spans from 1859 to 1866 with over 560 letters. While a few other correspondents are represented, the bulk of this series reflects both sides of the correspondence between George T. Stevens and Harriet ("Hattie") W. Stevens. Beginning with their courtship in 1859, the letters reflect George's early efforts to set up medical practice in Keeseville, New York, in 1861, his entry into the army, and their relationship and experiences throughout his service during the Civil War.

George's letters give a detailed glimpse into the practices of Civil War surgeons. Beginning with his efforts to secure an appointment as an Assistant Surgeon and the internal jockeying for position that caused infighting, George's letters to Hattie provide insight into the interpersonal conflicts and partnerships that undergirded his experience as an officer. Miscommunications about a medical furlough he took from May to October 1862 due to a case of typhoid fever led to his dismissal, and George's letters speak frankly about his efforts to reenlist as well as his frustrations with barriers to accomplishing this goal. Writing reports, securing transportation and goods, and tending to administrative details also pepper George's correspondence, shedding light on the clerical demands on his time.

George wrote frequently of daily life and tasks in camp, noting food, music and reading, camaraderie, mud, weather, camp health, and more. His detailed descriptions of camp life and activity also provide glimpses of others, including those who worked for him, like Dall Wadhams, who entered the army with him and stayed until March 1862, and James Mages, a young German-American, who worked for George from September 1863 to around June 1864 when he was taken prisoner of war.

George's commentary on camp life also at times reflects information about African Americans' experiences and white soldiers' opinions on race, slavery, and emancipation. Example references include:

  • African American workers (March 12, 1863; September 6, 1863; November 23, 1863; December 20, 1863; June 25, 1864)
  • "Contrabands" and refugees (March 25, 1862; June 20, 1863; August 2, 1863; October 17, 1863)
  • African American residents in Virginia who George encountered during marches (April 9, 1862; April 13, 1862; April 25, 1862)
  • Rumors of arson in Charleston (December 19, 1861)
  • Emancipation Proclamation (January 3, 1863; January 7, 1863)
  • African American soldiers (June 27, 1864)
  • Violence perpetrated against African American soldiers at Plymouth and Fort Pillow (April 26, 1864; May 3, 1864)

George T. Stevens' letters also reflect on marching conditions, as well as details about setting up hospitals and tending to the sick and wounded. Letters describing battles reflect not only on military movements and engagements but also on the fieldwork undertaken by surgeons, amputations in particular, and the dangers to which they were exposed. He commented on medicine, transport of the wounded, illness, and death. For much of May 1864, he was stationed in Fredericksburg tending to soldiers wounded during the Overland Campaign, before returning to his regiment late in the month, and his letters reflect this work.

In addition to passing references to additional battles, the military engagements or their aftermath that George T. Stevens' letters reflect on include:

  • Siege of Yorktown and Battle of Lee's Mill (April 1862)
  • Battle of Williamsburg (May 1862)
  • Chancellorsville Campaign and Second Battle of Fredericksburg (April and May 1863)
  • Battle of Franklin's Crossing (June 1863)
  • Battle of Gettysburg (July 1863)
  • Bristoe Campaign (October 1863)
  • Battle of Rappahannock Station (November 1863)
  • Battle of Mine Run (December 1863)
  • Battle of the Wilderness (May 1864)
  • Battle of Spotsylvania Court House (May 1864)
  • Battle of Cold Harbor (June 1864)
  • Siege of Petersburg (June 1864)
  • Shenandoah Valley Campaign (August 1864)
  • Third Battle of Winchester (September 1864)
  • Battle of Fisher's Hill (September 1864)

George and Harriet discussed their own health in good detail. George experienced a difficult bout of typhoid fever beginning in May 1862 and another illness in April 1864, which brought Harriet to tend to him during his recoveries. George and Harriet both commented on military and political events. Harriet was an avid reader of the news, tracking the 77th Regiment's movements and engagements. George commented several times that she was better informed than he was. "The rumors you have in regard to our moving are only the reports of the soldiers in camp who know as much of our future movements as they do of the next arctic expedition in search of Sir John Franklin," he wrote on January 24, 1862. Both were candid in their criticisms of military leaders.

As his regiment was periodically stationed near Washington, D.C., including for several months in late 1861 and early 1862, George's letters contain commentary about conditions in the city. Harriet's occasional trips to visit George in camp or to tend to him during bouts of illness also found her staying in D.C. She remained in the city hoping to visit George while the Battle of Gettysburg was being fought. Her letters during these times provide additional insight into how women and camp followers experienced D.C. and how residents responded to war news.

Harriet's letters written while she was staying with family at Wadham's Mills and Crown Point provide information about the home front. Discussions of finances, family news, anxiety for George's wellbeing, military events, health, music and reading, and more pepper her letters. As she and George wrote each other frequently, both sides of their conversation are often represented, showing the back-and-forth dialog that the couple sustained throughout the war. Notes written on envelopes by Harriet W. Stevens in later years identify letters that were of interest to her or provide clarifying information, hinting at George and Harriet's ongoing consultation of their wartime correspondence. George and Harriet's interest in botany is also well represented in the series. They discussed plants and sent each other pressed flowers and leaves.

Frances ("Frankie") Wadhams Davenport Ormsbee is also well reflected in the series. While she contributed only a small handful of letters, George T. and Harriet Stevens commented regularly on her and her husband George Davenport, beginning with a reference to their courtship in a letter from May 13, 1859. George T. Stevens discussed visits with George Davenport while they were both in active service, as well as with Frances while she was visiting him in camp. Letters referencing Frances, as well as George's own letters detailing his preparations for Harriet to visit him in camp, provide insight into officers' wives' experiences staying in the military encampments. Upon George Davenport's death at the Battle of the Wilderness, George T. Stevens wrote home with news he had about the nature of his death and burial, and corresponded with Harriet and Frances as they worked to recover his body and process their grief.

Several letters from other members of the Stevens and Wadhams families are also present. Additionally, as Wadham's Mills was located near the Canadian and Vermont borders, the series at times reflects on affairs in those regions. For example, Harriet W. Stevens' letter from December 19, 1861, states, "...the most prominent business men in Canada were drilling men three times a week. Frankie & I think that if we go to war with England, we shall just put on pants & go to." She also wrote of news regarding St. Albans Raid (October 20, 1864; October 23, 1864; October 30, 1864; November 2, 1864).

Correspondence from after George's service is far less frequent. It includes a letter from a former patient whose arm he saved during the war (February 19, 1865), a few letters from other members of the 77th Regiment, and material relating to the Stevens's move to Albany. One item written by James McKean on May 3-June 8, 1865, outlines reactions to news of the Civil War in Honduras, including references to an African American man and young indigenous Honduran boy.

George T. Stevens included sketches and drawings in some of his letters to Harriet. Letters that include pen-and-ink illustrations are listed below:

  • February 20, 1861: wedding ring designs
  • December 17, 1861: George T. Stevens' furnishings at the Regimental Head Quarters
  • December 29, 1861: decorated encampment of the Vermont 4th
  • January 8, 1862: sketch of Fredericksburg and vicinity
  • January 12, 1862: map of cross-roads where he got lost in D.C.
  • January 21, 1862: portrait of Dall Wadhams to illustrate weight loss
  • January 29, 1862: sketch of his quarters
  • February 2, 1862: possum
  • February 5, 1862: sketch map of Washington and Georgetown area
  • February 9, 1862: hospital wards
  • December 19, 1862: principal building of the Soldiers' Home in Virginia; chain bridge that slowed their march
  • March 11, 1862: makeshift tent while on march near Fairfax Courthouse
  • March 18, 1862: camp scene with makeshift tent near Alexandria
  • March 29, 1862: agricultural tools used by African Americans; wooden gun with hog's head placed in the muzzle
  • April 3, 1862: sketch map of march route in Virginia
  • April 9, 1862: musical notations and sketch of buildings
  • April 25, 1862: birds-eye-view of three farms and sketch of a farmhouse's steps and door
  • April 25, 1862: sketch of three farms
  • November 18, 1862: pattern for chevrons and illustration of where they will be attached to sleeves
  • November 27, 1862: steaming plum pudding served at Thanksgiving
  • December 25, 1862: camp for the 77th Regiment decorated for Christmas
  • February 24, 1863: snowball fight in camp
  • April 9, 1863: sketch of military insignia on the hat worn by a young girl who accompanied Abraham Lincoln on a review of the army
  • October 17, 1863: sketch map of troop positions
  • September 8, 1864: traced floral patterns

The Bundled Correspondence Sub-Series reflects the original bundling of these sub-sets of letters, with each then arranged chronologically. One bundle consists of nine letters and documents from ca. 1859-1860, as well as undated items, relating to Miss Slater's School for Young Ladies in Lansingburgh, New York. The other bundle includes six letters from 1868 relating to resolving an incident when George T. Stevens received double payment while in the service in 1864.

The Documents Series is divided into four sub-series. The Chronological Documents Sub-Series consists of eleven items ranging in date from 1856 to 1864, including Castleton Medical College admission tickets; a subscription receipt toFlag of Our Union ; a partially printed notebook listing voters in the town of Keene in 1858; a small leather wallet containing notes documenting George and Harriet's travels in 1861, money received, and letters; an 1864 document from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer relieving Stevens of duty; General Orders 222 from 1864; a partial copy of the regiment's participation in military campaigns from May to July 1864; undated GAR Roster; and an undated list of three people, "not paid."

The bundled documents sub-series represent the original bundling of the documents as they arrived at the Clements, but each grouping was then arranged chronologically. The Bundled Military Documents Sub-Series consists of:

  • Five Civil War Passes, 1861-1862
  • Six Reports of Sick and Wounded, compiled by George T. Stevens, December 1861- May 1862
  • Approximately 66 documents relating to "Monthly Reports of Hospital Supplies &c," February 1863- March 1865
  • Seven lists of casualties and enlisted men, primarily for the 77th Regiment, 1864-1865

The Bundled G.A.R. Documents Sub-Series consists of the following bundles:

  • "Papers relating to Soldiers & Sailors Union," with three petitions, 1866-1867, to charter subordinate unions in Eastchester, Utica, and Newburgh, New York, respectively, and one letter stating why the Yonkers Soldiers' and Sailors' Union would not be represented in a convention. A note written by Harriet W. Stevens in 1920 states that the Soldiers' and Sailors' Union merged into the Society of the G.A.R. in George T. Stevens' Albany office in 1867.
  • "Papers relating to the formation of the society of the Grand Army of the Republic of the state of New York," with approximately 23 documents dating between December 1866 and December 1867. These include general orders and circulars from the Headquarters Department of New York as well as undated petitions to apply for a charter for a post of the G.A.R. All of the petitions are blank, except one with a single signature.
  • "Special Orders [GAR], 1867," with 11 documents, written by Frank J. Bramhall or George T. Stevens regarding G.A.R. procedures
  • "1867," with approximately 25 documents dating between September 1866 and November 1867, many relating to G.A.R. charters, membership applications, reports and rosters, and other business.

The Miscellaneous Bundled Documents Sub-Series consists of two rolled bundles:

  • 8 appointments, certificates, and diplomas for George T. Stevens, 1864-1881, including his Army appointments to Assistant Surgeon and Surgeon, Army discharge, diploma from Castleton Medical College, certificate for his honorary degree from Union College, as well as several certificates for medical societies and the military organizations
  • 3 genealogical documents, including a blank genealogical form, "Ancestral Chart, 1879;" a copy of the chart filled out for Charles Wadhams Stevens' ancestry; and a small version of the Charles Wadhams Stevens genealogy.

The Writings Series includes:

  • George T. Stevens manuscript drafts of autobiographical writings. Dated notes range from 1910 to 1914. Sections include: Childhood; The School at Chazy; Elizabethtown; Personal Reminiscences: My First Wage Earning; My First Engagement as Schoolmaster; School at Keeseville; My First Field of Practice; [Leaving Keeseville and Entering the Army]; My Time as a Soldier; Notes of the Life in the Army; Williamsburgh; Albany Beginnings of Botanical Experiences; The Nature Club; [A Trip to Europe].
  • George T. Stevens biography, a brief two-page manuscript outlining his Civil War service and professional and academic achievements, particularly in relation to ophthalmology.
  • George T. Stevens typed reply to a G.A.R. questionnaire with manuscript additions, providing information about his military service and post-war career. Includes additional text, "Beginnings of the Grand Army of the Republic in the State of New York."
  • Harriet W. Stevens, "Some War Time Recollections by the Wife of an Army Surgeon," a 42-page typed draft with manuscript corrections of a paper she read before the National Society of New England Women. Particular attention is paid to the Peninsular Campaign of 1861, her visits with George T. Stevens in camp in 1863, stays in Washington, D.C., and tending to George during his bouts of illness. A shorter, 13-page copy is also present.
  • Frances Davenport Ormsbee, "A War Reminiscence," a 12-page typescript that relates George Davenport's service, her visits with him during the war, his death, and efforts to locate his grave and recover his body. Also includes a photocopy of a transcribed letter from June 10, 1865, from Frances describing the retrieval of George Davenport and Captain Ormsbee's bodies.
  • "Army Papers Written by Members of the Sixth Corps," with three different unattributed and undated items: "June 20th Fight at Mechanicsville," 2 pages, and two partial military recollections, 4 pages and 16 pages respectively.

The Scrapbook Series consists of one volume with material primarily relating to George T. Stevens' post-Civil War life and career tipped or pasted in. Dated items range from 1861 to 1918. Material relates to his work with the Albany Medical College, Nature Club of Albany, the Albany Institute and its Field Meetings, the Grand Army of the Republic, military reunions, the Troy Scientific Association, the Soldiers and Sailors Union, and some references to his publications. Some material relates to his medical career, primarily ephemera from medical associations, lectures, and notices of his awards and achievements. Two Civil War-era items include an 1861 newspaper clipping from Keeseville announcing George T. Stevens' appointment in the Army and an 1861 printed circular calling to organize a Bemis Heights Battalion. Only a handful of items relate to Harriet W. Stevens and their social life. Formats include newspaper clippings, postcards, disbound pages, fliers, programs, advertisements, business or calling cards, and circulars, among others.

The Photographs Series features the following:

  • 10 cartes-de-visite of "Officers of the 77th Regt. NYS Vols." Named individuals include Winsor B. French, Henry J. Adams (of the 118th Infantry), David J. Caw, [Isaac D.] Clapp, Martin Lennon, and "Robert."
  • Approximately 12 photographs of George T. Stevens appear in a variety of formats, including cartes-de-visite, cabinet cards, studio portraits, a framed photo, among others. The tintypes, ambrotypes, and daguerreotypes are detailed separately below.
  • 10 photographs of Harriet W. Stevens dating from 1861 into her older age.
  • 15 photographs of Frances Virginia Stevens Ladd, ranging from when she was a baby through her older age. Dated items range from 1866 to 1922, and several show her wearing theatrical garb.
  • 5 photographs of Charles Wadhams Stevens, ranging from when he was a baby into his middle age. Dated items range from 1868 to 1880.
  • 2 photographs of Georgina Wadhams Stevens, one a tinted reproduction of a photo on a cabinet card, and another a cyanotype of an interior scene displaying a framed painted portrait of her, likely anteceding her death.
  • 3 photographs of George Trumbull Ladd.

In addition to the above, the Photographs Series also includes two tinted ambrotypes of George T. Stevens; one tinted tintype of George T. and Harriet W. Stevens with George and Frances Davenport; one tinted daguerreotype of Frances and George Davenport; and a ca. 1864 tintype of George T. Stevens in the field in Virginia, wearing his uniform while mounted on a horse, with his groom, Austin, standing with his mule.

The Printed Materials Series primarily consists of pamphlets dating from 1850 to 1915 and includes material relating to the Sons of Temperance, Castleton Medical College, the Independent Order of Good Templars, Masons, and an Ex-Soldiers' Handbook. One pamphlet includes George T. Stevens' address to the Survivors' Association of the 77th Regiment, "The First Fighting Campaign of the Seventy-Seventh N.Y.V." There are also 165 copies of the print, "The Chimneys - April 5, 1862. Drawing by George T. Stevens." Six books are located in the Clements Library's Book Division. Please see the list in the Additional Descriptive Data below for a complete list.

The Realia Series includes the following items:

  • Pair of white leather gloves, with note by Harriet W. Stevens: "These white kid gloves were G. T. Stevens worn when we were married."
  • George T. Stevens Civil War uniform items, including dark green silk surgeon's sash, white cotton gloves, blue shoulder strap, and golden hat ornament.
  • Pair of white cotton gloves, with note by Harriet W. Stevens, "worn by Chas. W. Stevens when he was a drummer boy at Albany Academy."
  • Pair of children's leather gloves and shoes. Note by Harriet W. Stevens suggests they belonged to Frances V. Stevens Ladd.
  • Pair of knitted white and blue socks with ribbon, in envelope labeled "These were Little Georgies socks," likely referring to Georgina Wadhams (1871-1882).
  • 1910 G.A.R. badge.

Collection

Gilbert L. Thompson papers, 1842-1872

1 linear foot

This collection contains correspondence, documents, financial records, reports, and other items pertaining to Gilbert L. Thompson. The material relates to Thompson's work as the United States Navy's chief engineer from 1842-1844, and his involvement in the coal and transportation industries in the mid- to late 19th century.

This collection (1 linear foot) contains correspondence, documents, financial records, reports, and other items pertaining to Gilbert L. Thompson. The material relates to Thompson's work as the United States Navy's chief engineer from 1842-1844, and his involvement in the coal and transportation industries.

The Correspondence series (155 items) is mostly made up of incoming business letters to Gilbert L. Thompson; outgoing drafts by Thompson and business letters between other persons are also present. The first group of items concern Thompson's service as the United States Navy's chief engineer from 1842-1844, addressing many topics related to naval engineering and United States Navy vessels. The remaining correspondence, dated 1850-1861 and 1865-1872, largely pertains to Thompson's business interests and his stake in various ventures. Thompson wrote and received letters about coal and oil industries, railroads, domestic commerce, and attempts to establish regular steamship trade between the United States and Europe after the Civil War. Many of the latter items pertain to the Norfolk and St. Nazaire Steam Navigation Company and to commerce in the South during the early years of Reconstruction. Thompson's prominent correspondents included Secretary of the Treasury Walter Forward, Secretary of the Navy Abel Parker Upshur, and Virginia governor Francis Harrison Pierpont.

The Documents series is divided into two subseries. The Legal Documents (34 items), which include copies of legislation, by-laws, indentures, and other items, pertain to naval engineering, transatlantic trade between the United States and Europe, and Gilbert L. Thompson's business affairs. Several items relate to the Norfolk and St. Nazaire Steam Navigation Company and to the American Iron Shipbuilding, Mining, and Manufacturing Company. One indenture relates to land that Thompson and his wife owned in Fairfax County, Virginia, and includes a manuscript map of the property (December 13, 1844). Financial Documents (14 items) are made up of accounts and other items pertaining to the Western Virginia Coal Company, the Coal Oil and Paraffin Company of Baltimore, steamship construction and operation, the USS Missouri, and other subjects.

Reports and Drafts (53 items) pertain to the Norfolk and St. Nazaire Steam Navigation Company, steam boiler explosions, coal lands in Pennsylvania and Virginia, the United States Navy, and transportation. Some memorials addressed to the United States Congress mention relevant legislation.

The Notes and Drawings series (90 items) contains technical drawings, manuscript maps, and notes about steam engines, mining and drilling equipment and practices, and other subjects.

Three Newspaper Clippings from the early 1870s concern the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, a property dispute involving General Bradley T. Johnson, steamships, and the sale of an iron furnace.