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Collection

1961-1962 Michigan Constitutional Convention Collection, 1929, 1961-1964, and undated

3 cubic feet (in 7 boxes)

1961-1962 Michigan Constitutional Convention Collection includes: correspondence, meeting minutes and Action Journals, public hearing summaries, phone messages, notes, television and radio transcripts, testimony, calendars, agendas, press releases, pamphlets, election results, newspaper clippings, public statements and remarks, and photographs.

The collection contains meeting minutes and Action Journals, correspondence, public hearing summaries, phone messages, notes, calendars, agendas, television and radio transcripts, testimony, calendars, agendas, pamphlets, press releases, election results, newspaper clippings, public statements and remarks, and photographs about the 1961-1962 Michigan Constitutional Convention, or Con-Con. There is also a Saginaw County Circuit Court jury summons card. Besides the jury summons card, the collection materials focus on Charles Anspach running as a delegate and his contributions to Con-Con.

Collection

Abbé Montesquiou journal, ca. 1798

102 pages

This travel account of Abbé Montesquiou was written in 1798 three years after his trip to American from 1758-1832. The journal covers Montesquiou's travels as well as his thoughts on America, Canada and the mid-Atlantic areas he visits.

Montesquiou's 'journal' is not a standard travel account: it goes beyond pure description to include discussions of the philosophy and the history, the people and government of the nation. The journal appears to have been written following the Abbé's return to France with internal evidence suggesting 1798 as the most likely date. Perhaps because of the time that had elapsed between his voyage and its writing, the journal includes as many opinions on his experiences in North America as it does actual description of what he has seen. Montesquiou is naturally analytical in his writing style, and he has a penchant for 'augmenting' his personal observations with views and opinions that appear to have been culled from written sources. Thus his discussion of the Philadelphia Yellow Fever epidemic of 1793 contains information that may have been derived from the opinions of contemporary scientists, and his discussions of the relative merits of monarchy and democracy are sufficiently generic that the American context seems almost incidental.

Montesquiou is generally an unsympathetic observer of the young United States; while he appreciates the scenery and the productivity of the nation he is strongly critical of the hypocrisy of 'Republican' slaveholders, of the nation's leaders -- particularly Washington and Jefferson. While he admires the Philadelphia prison system, he is repelled by what he considers the crass, ultra-capitalist sensibilities of Americans. Among the more interesting aspects of the 'journal' are his extended discussions of the prison system and a theory of crime and punishment, slavery, the American character, and democracy and monarchy.

Collection

A. B. Pinkham report, 1830

1 volume

Alexander B. Pinkham sailed from Boston, Massachusetts, to Brazil with a crew of boys on the brig Clio in 1829 and 1830. In his report to William Coffin, president of the board of trustees for the Coffin School of Nantucket, Massachusetts, Pinkham discussed his experiences during the first leg of the voyage, intended to teach the boys the art of sailing.

Alexander B. Pinkham sailed from Boston, Massachusetts, to Brazil with a crew of boys on the brig Clio in 1829 and 1830. In his 18-page report to William Coffin, president of the board of trustees for the Coffin School of Nantucket, Massachusetts, Pinkham discussed his experiences during the first leg of the voyage.

The Clio sailed from Boston on December 23, 1829, and reached Brazil around 66 days later. Pinkham wrote his report on May 23 and 24, 1830, after visiting Rio Grande and Porto Alegre. He recounted incidents from the outbound voyage, such as his failed attempt to commemorate the ship's crossing of the equator (pp. 5-6), and frequently mentioned his attempts to instruct the boys under his care. After reaching Brazil, where they unloaded cargo, the crew remained on shore while the Clio was repainted, and Pinkham reported his anxiety about possible robbery (p. 3, 5). He also mentioned the crew's encounter with a village inhabited by German immigrants (pp. 13-14). The report is interrupted by Pinkham's account of an encounter with a British vessel, which occurred on May 24, 1830, before he began the second half of his letter (pp. 8-9). The British officers threatened to fire on the Clio following Pinkham's refusal to provide the ship's papers. Near the end of the document, Pinkham referred to personal criticisms by residents of Nantucket and shared his hope that his reputation would be salvaged (pp. 18-19).

Collection

Abraham P. Sherril schoolbook and daybooks, 1815-1818, 1837-1850

5 volumes

This collection consists of a manuscript schoolbook that belonged to Abraham P. Sherril in the mid-1810s and 4 daybooks that Sherril kept between 1837 and 1850. The schoolbook contains rules and example problems in subjects such as mathematics, business finance, and surveying, as well as examples of a daybook and double-entry ledger. The daybooks concern sales of foodstuffs, cloth, and other items in Pike, New York, from the 1830s-1850s.

This collection consists of a manuscript schoolbook and 4 daybooks. The Schoolbook (145 pages) contains 118 pages of notes and example problems concerning mathematics, business finance, and surveying, dated at East Hampton, New York, from March 1815-March 1818. Many of the geometrical and surveying problems are illustrated, and financial problems pertain to subjects such as European currencies and calculation of interest. The schoolbook also includes a copied poem. The final 27 pages provide examples of a daybook (January 1, 1819-January 31, 1819, 11 pages) and double-entry ledger (January 1, 1819-May 29, 1819, 16 pages). The same accounts are represented in each of these sections, and most pertain to sales of foodstuffs and fabrics. The 4 Daybooks (June 22, 1837-May 29, 1850, 765 pages) record Sherril's accounts with customers in Pike, New York. He sold foodstuffs such as butter, spices, and tea; household goods such as brooms and nails; clothing and fabrics such as calico; and other items, such as tobacco and soap.

Collection

Adam Cosner papers, 1864-1865; 1880

25 items

The Cosner papers document the experience of a middle-aged Union soldier serving with the 21st Ohio Infantry during the Civil War.

Cosner's letters reflect his rather unusual position as a middle-aged soldier. Sixteen of the 18 letters in the collection were written to his wife, Ann B. Cosner, and the other two were addressed to his daughter, Martha, one in 1880. Cosner's handwriting suggests that he was not an experienced letter-writer, nor are his descriptive skills well developed, seldom advancing beyond straightforward comments and never at length. Cosner's letters, however, do reflect the attitudes of many pious, honest soldiers trying to live a Christian life in the middle of a seemingly godless war, and, unusually, display an open reticence about entering combat.

Collection

Adam Ludewig diary, 1885

1 volume

Adam Ludewig, an Alpena, Michigan, bookseller's clerk in his early 20s, recorded information about his activities, interactions, and the weather in this pre-printed daily Excelsior diary. He provided very brief notes on his work in the store; documentation of church and Sunday school attendance; remarks on letters, notes, and visits by young women; the books he read; painting lessons; and other subjects. He frequently abbreviated names and other words, occasionally wrote sentences with old German script, and sometimes encoded words with pigpen cyphers.

Adam Ludewig, an Alpena, Michigan, bookseller's clerk in his early 20s, recorded information about his activities, interactions, and the weather in this pre-printed daily Excelsior diary. He provided very brief notes on his work in the store ("All well / Busy in Store"); documentation of church and Sunday school attendance; and mentions of letters, notes, and visits by young women—with occasional afterthoughts such as "poor girl is to have a tooth pulled this morning" or "I do not know what to do. Time will be my best support." He noted the books he read, from "Titcomb's Letters to Young People, Single and Married" to Goethe's "The Sorrow of Young Werther." He painted and studied French. Ludewig frequently abbreviated names and other words, occasionally wrote sentences with old German script, and sometimes encoded words with pigpen cyphers. Seven small pen and ink drawings are scattered within the volume.

Civic and other organizational work mentioned in the diary include financial support for the German Aid Society and the Arbeiterverein, and attendance at evening Masonic Lodge meetings (identified in the diary only as drawings of oblong squares in quotation marks). He became Secretary and noted that he paid $1.00 for life insurance from the Masons (for $1,500 coverage).

Collection

Adam R. Barr mathematics exercise book, 1843

1 volume

Adam R. Barr of Conestoga Township, Pennsylvania, created this mathematics exercise book or cipher book of mathematical operations, rules and theorems, and example problems. Sections labeled with calligraphic lettering include the Single Rule of 3, Double Rule of 3, Simple Interest, Insurance, Commission, Barter, Fellowship, Exchange, Vulgar Fractions, Decimal Fractions, and others.

Adam R. Barr of Conestoga Township, Pennsylvania, created this mathematics exercise book or cipher book of mathematical operations, rules and theorems, and example problems. Sections labeled with calligraphic lettering include the Single Rule of 3, Double Rule of 3, Simple Interest, Insurance, Commission, Barter, Fellowship, Exchange, Vulgar Fractions, Decimal Fractions, and others.

Collection

Addison D. and Minerva Skinner collection, 1864

9 items

This collection is made up of letters that Minerva Fox Skinner received from and about her husband, Addison D. Skinner of the 8th Michigan Infantry Regiment, in 1864. Skinner's letters describe his travels and discuss his homesickness; the remaining letters pertain to his death and burial.

This collection contains 9 letters that Minerva Fox Skinner of Parshallville, Michigan, received from and about her husband, Addison Dwight Skinner, in 1864. He wrote 6 letters to his wife while serving with the 8th Michigan Infantry Regiment from March 1, 1864-March 29, 1864. He described his travels to Flint, Michigan; Cincinnati, Ohio; Louisville, Kentucky; and Annapolis, Maryland, and wrote of his homesickness and his love for his wife and children. In his letter of March 23, 1864, he complained that he had not yet been paid; on March 29, 1864, he reported on the spread of measles throughout the regiment and confided to his wife that the death of George Griswold, a soldier from his regiment, had been caused by a case of "clap."

Minerva Fox Sinner received 2 letters from her brother, Wells B. Fox, about her husband's failing health and death (April 24, 1864, and May 30, 1864). In his second letter, Fox expressed his sympathy and offered reassurances that Skinner had thought often of his family during his final days. He also noted his resolve for the army to march to Richmond. Helen M. Noye (later Hoyt), a nurse at the Naval Academy Hospital in Annapolis, Maryland, wrote to Minerva Skinner on May 11, 1864, offering condolences for the death of A. D. Skinner, and discussing his burial. Noye, who believed that Minerva Skinner had yet learned of her husband's death, informed Minerva that the remains could be exhumed, but advised against doing so.

Collection

Adirondack Region photograph albums, [ca. 1895]

2 volumes

These photograph albums contain pictures of scenery, people, and buildings in the Adirondack Region of northern New York and in Washington, D.C.

These photograph albums (19cm x 30cm) contain 49 pictures of scenery, people, and buildings in the Adirondack Region of northern New York. Labeled photographs show buildings, animals, and scenery in and around Ilion, New York; Clifton, New York; Oxbow, New York; Chippewa Bay, New York; the Grass River; the Oswegatchie River; and Washington, D.C. Houses and other buildings shown include a home on "Preston Isle" in Chippewa Bay, the "Old Morris House" (a colonial stone house), an abandoned iron furnace, the White House, and the United States Capitol. Photographs of construction equipment are also present. Of the individuals and groups pictured, only Jack Moffett, a young boy, is identified. Photographs of note include pictures of an encampment, the exterior of a log cabin decorated with pine boughs, game and fish, and replicas of the ships Niña, Pinta, and Santa Maria. Two photographs indicate the photographer's interest in capturing motion: one shows the Empire State Express at full speed and another shows a woman throwing water, captured at a shutter speed of 1/50 second. The albums have black or blue binding with "Photographs" embossed in gold on the covers.

Collection

Agnes B. Laidlaw diary, 1896

1 volume

Agnes B. Laidlaw described her daily activities in New York City from February 11, 1896, to June 20, 1896, in her diary. She frequently discussed her love of painting, social life, and thoughts about romantic love.

In her diary (125 pages), Agnes B. Laidlaw described her daily activities in New York City from February 11, 1896, to June 20, 1896. She composed daily entries between February 11 and June 7, and one additional entry on June 20. Laidlaw lived in Manhattan's Upper West Side, where she attended dinner parties, dances, and other events. She commented on her acquaintances, which included both men and women, and recorded her thoughts about romantic relationships and love (such as her discomfort with second marriages, June 6, 1896, pp. 121-122). On March 9, she recalled meeting a man on a streetcar, to whom she found herself instantly attracted (pp. 30-31). Laidlaw wrote about her fondness for painting and her attendance at French classes. Her social activities included visits to restaurants, concerts, and other performances. On one occasion, she hosted a dinner party, and her diary includes a diagram of attendees' positions at a table (May 14, pp. 87-89). The first 2 pages contain reminiscences about Laidlaw's childhood.

Collection

A. Hughes journal, 1816

1 volume

The author of this journal, entitled "Journal de mon Voyage dans les Etats Unis D'Amerique" (34 pages), recorded his or her experiences while traveling from Montréal, Québec, to the eastern United States in the summer of 1816. The journey included visits to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C.

The author of this journal, entitled Journal de mon Voyage dans les Etats Unis D'Amerique (34 pages), recorded his or her experiences while traveling from Montréal, Québec, to the eastern United States in the summer of 1816. The author left Montréal on June 28, 1816, and boarded a steamboat on the Richelieu River the following morning. After traveling through New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland by steamboat and stagecoach until mid-July, the writer reached Washington, D.C. The journal records a visit to Samuel Hughes at his Mount Pleasant estate near Havre de Grace, Maryland, on July 11, 1816 (pp. 24-25), as well as the author's experiences in and architectural observations about Albany, New York; New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; and Washington, D.C. From July 24, 1816-August 5, 1816, the author made brief entries about the return voyage to Canada. The final 2 pages include additional manuscript notes.

Collection

Alan and Joyce Rudolph Papers, 1972 - 2011

35 Linear Feet (57 manuscript boxes and 7 flat oversize boxes)

The Rudolph papers include scripts, articles and clippings, publicity and press materials, books, photographs, artifacts/realia, audio and moving image materials, posters, awards, and branded crew garments and caps from many of Alan Rudolph's projects. Photographer Joyce Rudolph is represented by hundreds of professional and personal slides and photographs, including many candid on-set shots.

The collection consists of professional and personal correspondence, assorted clippings, film festival awards and memorabilia, and scripts and production documents related to Alan Rudolph's filmmaking career, spanning his early work in Riot (1969), through 2002's The Secret Lives of Dentists. Also included are a plethora of documents from various unproduced projects. In the Artifacts and Graphics series are a small selection of props from Rudolph's films, most notably The Moderns, along with an assortment of film cast and crew branded gear, including caps, shirts, and jackets, movie posters, and a representation of some of the numerous awards won by the Rudolphs.

A small sub-series of material devoted to friend and mentor, Robert Altman, consists of articles and reviews, assorted programs, and, most notably, photographs taken by Joyce Rudolph.

Joyce Rudolph is represented by hundreds of her professional and sought-after on-set photographs, company stills, and candid shots, all taken during the filming of projects by Alan Rudolph and a wide variety of other notable filmmakers.

A series of Audio and Moving Image material consists of several VHS tapes, several movie video disks as well as two soundtracks. The Artwork series contains an assortment of drawings and paintings, most likely created by Alan Rudolph, along with two large acrylic paintings used as props in The Moderns.

Collection

Alaska and Yellowstone photograph album, [ca. 1888]

1 volume

This photograph album contains photographs of scenery in Alaska, Yellowstone National Park, and the Yosemite Valley in the late 19th century. Several photographs feature tourists or members of the photographer's traveling party, and others were taken onboard the steamer Queen.

This photograph album (25cm x 19cm) contains 87 photographic prints depicting scenes in Alaska, Yellowstone National Park, and the Yosemite Valley in the late 19th century. The photographs, all of which have captions, were taken during visits to four geographic areas: Muir Glacier (21 photographs); Tacoma, Washington, and Helena, Montana (8 items); Yosemite National Park (48 items); and the Yosemite Valley and Arizona (10 items). Most photographs show natural scenery such as mountains, rock formations, waterfalls, and geysers, and some are pictures of hotels. Many show tourists climbing or viewing natural formations and scenery, and some show members of the photographer's party posing for portraits.

The album has two identical prints of a group of amateur photographers holding box cameras onboard the Queen, which is shown in several other photographs. Views of buildings in Sitka, Alaska; Tacoma, Washington; Helena, Montana; and Yosemite National Park are also included. One photograph shows a woman modeling a Chilkat blanket and totem pole cane, and another shows a "Tamed Bear" standing on a raised platform. Also of note is a picture of a train, taken as the photographer's party disbanded near Chicago. The volume is a quarter-bound album with a title stamped on the cover in gold: "Photographs."

Collection

Albert G. Fuller reminiscences, [1930s]

1 item

This collection consists of Clarice A. Bouton's transcriptions of the Civil War reminiscences of her grandfather, Albert G. Fuller. Fuller, a native of Reading, Michigan, served in the 78th New York Infantry Regiment, Company K, and participated in actions including the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg, and Sherman's March to the Sea.

This collection consists of Clarice A. Bouton's transcriptions (8 pages) of the Civil War reminiscences of her grandfather, Albert G. Fuller. Fuller recounted many incidents from his time in the 78th New York Infantry Regiment, which he joined on March 20, 1862, with three friends from his hometown of Reading, Michigan: Lemuel Wisner, William Herrington, and William Green, all killed during the war. He discussed his regiment's movements and marches, his time in hospitals recuperating from bullet wounds, and his participation in battles, skirmishes, and Sherman's March to the Sea. He described wounded soldiers lying in their tents, nursed by other soldiers; the interruption of his meal immediately prior to the Battle of Peachtree Creek; the harsh treatment and execution of three deserters; and the Union Army's destructive practices while marching from Atlanta to Savannah.

Fuller noted the deaths and disappearances of his hometown friends and recalled his recuperation in hospitals in York, Pennsylvania, after the Battle of Gettysburg, and Savannah, Georgia, in 1864; while in York, he attended a political speech that was disrupted by gunfire, resulting in a panic and further injuries to his wounded leg. Fuller's account ends with his discharge on June 2, 1865, and his return to the family farm on June 20, 1865, where he resumed work immediately upon his arrival.

Collection

Alexander B. Weeks Diaries, 1851,1870, and undated

.25 cubic feet (in 1 box)

Diaries of Alexander B. Weeks, photograph of Weeks and wife, Sarah, and biographical materials.

The collection consists of three of Weeks’ diaries, volume 1) January 1, 1851- September 20, 1851, volume 2) September 21, 1851- February 29, 1852, and volume 3) October 2, 1853- December 15, 1857. The collection is organized alphabetically In the first diary, Weeks noted social and family news, visitors, the weather, major newspaper stories, and patrons or “sitters” who sat for “their likenesses.” He also commented several times about his daughters, particularly little Manty who was teething, learning to talk, walk, and was inoculated.

In the end of volume 1 and all of volume 2, Weeks vividly described his voyage to Brazil with Charles Deforest Fredricks, his fellow passengers, weather, other ships seen, seasickness, etc. Once in Brazil, Weeks noted his busy business, social activities, his friends Charles Saturnino Masoni and George Penabert, the natives, landscape, religious and other customs, slavery, and the local political struggles between Rosas, the Provincial Governor of Buenos Aires, and Gen. Urquiza. Similarly, he describes the beginning of his return voyage home and Montevideo, Uruguay, as well as correspondence with his family, and how much he misses them.

The first two diaries have some of Week’s poetry in the rear of the volumes and a few notes and doodles on the inside covers. The name of the printers who created the book in Pernambuco, Brazil, is pasted on the inside front cover of volume 2.

In his third diary Weeks documented his domestic life and business transactions in Toledo, Ohio, and Detroit, covering the same topics as in the first diary, before his voyage. The third diary is missing its front cover. The first page is divided into columns to serve as an account book. The headings of the columns are: Date, Names, Residence, Size, Price, Case, D/P (D/P probably means: Daguerreotype/Photograph).

Biographical Materials include: Week’s business cards from Poughkeepsie, undated (circa 1841?), a bill to an estate for money owed to Sarah Ann Weeks, August 5, 1870, and a photograph (copy) of Sarah and Alexander Weeks.

Collection

Alexander Dunlop memorandum book, 1686-1688, 1699

93 folios

Alexander Dunlop was a Scottish immigrant to South Carolina in 1685. His memorandum book contains a short narrative of his voyage to Antigua, entries concerning his financial affairs, a letter to his wife, and land rental entries from his son John.

The memorandum book of Alexander Dunlop is divided into three parts. The bulk of the book is written in Dunlop's hand between 1686 and 1688. Later additions were made by Dunlop's son John in 1699. Two additional entries are made in an unidentified hand.

The entries by Alexander Dunlop include a short narrative of the voyage of the vessel Richard and John of London from Kelburne (south of Largs, Ayrshire), in 1686 [folios 93-92, reversed at back of book]. Other entries related to this voyage include a note concerning £15 received from Lady Cardross, February 26, "to be delivered to My Lord Cardros when I shall come to portroyall in Carolina" and a note dated July 26 in Antigua that the money "was sent by me A D to Mylord Cardros with Tho: Steill some tyme my servitor according to his recept" [folio 2]. A copy of Steill's receipt, partly torn away, is on folio 4 the verso of folio 2 contains more accounts between Dunlop and Steill, particularly pay for the latter's service in the several weeks spent in Antigua. Folios 5 and 90b-89b contain accounts possibly related to this voyage.

The book also has a long letter from Alexander Dunlop to his wife Antonia [folios 7-13b]. Topics of the letter are money matters, sale of an estate to the Earl of Dundonald, the Earl's resignation in favor of the Dunlops' son John, their other children, and debts. This letter may have been Alexander's draft of intentions for care of his affairs after his death as he writes, "so you & freends may divyde among the childen as they deserve" [folio 9b:]. Other entries by Alexander also concern financial affairs and debts [folios 3, 5-6, and 89b-86b, folio 88 mentions "tutors" and "curators."]

The entries of John Dunlop all address the Dunlop's affairs in Scotland including financial notes and debts. Detailed descriptions, and tables titled "Rentall of the Lands of Dunlop," June 13, 1699 mentions a number of specific places, including the parks of Dunlop [folio 17], Auchentiber [folios 29b, 34], Stewarton [folio 34b], Mirrimouth [folio 20] and rents paid in money or in kind included meal, beer, hens, capons, coal, etc., some given with cash equivalents.

Additional notes in an unknown hand are made at the end of the rental accounts and with the letter of Alexander to his wife.

Collection

Alexandre Maurice Blanc de Lanautte, Comte d'Hauterive collection, 1809

14 items

This collection consists of 13 letters and copies of letters that Alexandre Maurice Blanc de Lanautte, Comte d'Hauterive, wrote in 1809 concerning the deterioration of Anglo-American relations, as well as a list of officials involved in Franco-American relations around the turn of the 19th century.

This collection consists of 13 letters and copies of letters that Alexandre Maurice Blanc de Lanautte, Comte d'Hauterive, wrote in 1809 concerning the deterioration in Anglo-American relations, as well as a list of officials involved in Franco-American relations around the turn of the 19th century.

Hauterive addressed 10 letters to Jean-Baptiste Nompère de Champagny, the French minister of foreign relations, reporting discoveries and insights from his correspondence with John Armstrong, Jr., the United States minister to France. Hauterive also discussed issues in British politics, such as the Embargo Act of 1807 and Great Britain's diplomatic relationship with the United States, which he thought was strained. He further elaborated on those issues he believed would lead the countries into armed conflict. Hauterive also commented on the Jefferson administration and its role in international affairs. The remaining 3 letters consist of Hauterive's outgoing correspondence with other diplomatic and official personnel.

A printed chart of French military personnel lists their positions, terms of service, and the amount of money paid to them. Ten officers are listed, followed by a drum major, a drum master sergeant, 8 musicians, and 4 laborers.

Collection

Alexis St. Martin collection, 1879

10 items

This collection is made up of correspondence and newspaper clippings by or related to Alexis St. Martin, a French-Canadian man who underwent medical experimentation and observation after surviving an open stomach wound.

This collection is made up of correspondence and newspaper clippings by or related to Alexis St. Martin, a French-Canadian man who underwent medical experimentation and observation after surviving an open stomach wound.

Eight letters and postcards, July-September 1879, pertain to James H. Etheridge's proposals to Alexis St. Martin, requesting that he visit Rush Medical College in Chicago, Illinois, for observation. Alexis St. Martin (3 items) and Henry F. Harris (4 items) wrote about St. Martin's possible involvement and financial compensation. Two newspaper clippings, written before 1880, concern St. Martin's wound, his later life, and Dr. William Beaumont's experiments on St. Martin's stomach. See the Detailed Box and Folder Listing for information about each individual item.

Collection

Algae from Fort Jefferson, Tortugas, Florida, [ca. 1864?]

1 volume

This album contains pressed algae specimens and a photograph of Fort Jefferson, Florida. Possibly compiled and owned by someone named Stuart.

This album (24cm x 24cm) contains 305 algae specimens collected around the mid-1860s, comprised of 294 items pressed onto 10cm x 6cm cards and 11 items pressed onto larger cards. Only one specimen is identified. The smaller cards are mounted six to a page and the larger cards are laid into the volume between pages of specimens. Numerous types of algae are represented, in a multitude of colors. The bottom cards on the first two facing pages spell the name "Stuart," which is also stamped in gilt on the front cover. The album is bound in brown leather and cloth with the title "Algae from Fort Jefferson, 'Tortugas,' Florida" is stamped on the back cover and "Album" stamped on the spine. A photograph of Florida's Fort Jefferson is pasted onto the first page as a frontispiece.

Collection

Alger (Mich.) Glass-plate Negatives, 1906, 2017, and undated

1.25 cubic ft. (in 3 Boxes)

The collection The collection, 1906, 2017, and undated, 1.25 cubic ft. (in 3 boxes) consists mostly of 284 glass-plate negatives mostly documenting building, people, and events in Alger, Michigan, 1906, 1911-1916, 1919 and undated.

The collection, 1906, 2017, and undated, 1.25 cubic ft. (in 3 boxes) includes 284 glass-plate negatives, one of which has two different images on it (#819-820) and two film negatives, mostly documenting building, people, and events in Alger, Michigan, 1906, 1911-1916, 1919 and undated. Most of the images are dated, or if undated date from, 1911 through 1916. There are a few 1906 images of California oil fields and derricks (3), and a man washing a buggy dated 1906, and an undated image of a southwestern Indian village, taken on a train, probably dates from the 1906 California trip. There is only one 1919 image, that of two seated women by a front window/ awning of a store with a dog, another store in background, July 1919.

In Box 3 (.25 cubic foot) there is one folder of notes October 1911-February 1917 by the photographer in various detail of which images were taken when, sometimes specified to days, sometimes not within the month, with names of subjects and some other details, such as Mrs. Allen’s birthday party (copies, 2017). There are images with dates for which there are no notes, for example 1906 and August 1912. There are original notes from the photographer for which there are no specifically identified images, such as September, November-December 1912, June 1914, Feb. 1915, Aug 1916, Feb. 1917. There are dated images for which there are no original notes, for example July 1915, Sept. and Nov. 1916, July 1919. Sometimes the notes and the images have slightly different dates, for example three baseball game images are dated May 6, 1916 but the notes say May 7, 1916. A number of the descriptions are to vague to match with specific images, such as all the names of men and MC [Michigan Central] Depot. There are six images of the depot, but not enough data to decipher which image was taken in which month and year. There are also a number of baby portraits, but again, not enough data to match the write baby image and name.

Another folder includes prints of a sample of the plates, undated. One of the images is of ships in a harbor and that glass-plate negative is not extant in the collection. Notation in pencil by the archivist links the image to the negative.

Also included in Box 3 (.25 cu. ft. box) is a Lewinstein Jewery Company (Midland, Mich.) Jewelry box, rectangular, crushed, purple velvet, cream satin lining, 6.5x4.25x1 inches, undated.

Most of the negatives have a date (written in various ways by the photographer), and/or number, or, more rarely, additional descriptive information, written onto the back of the plate. Some were grouped in paper or sleeves with numbers, dates, or additional information. Descriptive information which was written onto the back of the plate are noted in the Box and Folder Listing in “quotation marks,” while descriptive information that was that was on the original sleeve, papers surrounding a pile of negatives, or on the original paper Notes from the photographer are noted in the Box and Folder Listing in ‘commentary marks’. Some glass-plate negatives have no number, no information, and in a few cases the numbers or dates are obliterated by time or emulsion damage. The span of plate numbers ranges from #1 to 920, and there are many large gaps in the number sequence. The number sequence does not always follow chronological order. If undated images resemble closely other dated images, the same date has been added to the undated image in brackets [].

Sometimes the photographer gave different images the same number, in which case the archivist has given one an A and the other a B in the description to tell them apart.

#258A May 1914 large group dressed up seated at laden picnic table, may be ‘Picnic Dunn’s Grove May 1914’ or ‘May 3, 1914 Mrs. Allen’s birthday party’ (see #247-248, 255, 258B)- minor emulsion issues on edges, May 1914 and #258B in May 1914 pile, group or men, women, boys standing, sitting on porch with pillars, mostly wearing hats, sign reads ‘our high grade Indian remedies for sale here,” may be ‘Picnic Dunn’s Grove May 1914’ or ‘May 3, 1914 Mrs. Allen’s birthday party’(see #247-248, 255, 258A), May 1914.

If there is no number, but the image clearly relates to an/other numbered image/s, the archivist has noted the relationship by…. #253 “5/10/14” little girl seated in a child’s wagon, barn and large wagon in background (see no#after253), May 10, 1914 and #253 “5/10/14” little girl seated in a child’s wagon, barn and large wagon in background (see no#after253), May 10, 1914 and No#after#253 “5/10/14” little children, boy holding handle of child’s wagon, little girl seated in wagon, wagon and houses in background, same girl in #253 (see #253), May 10, 1914.

If there is no number, but the image clearly relates to an/other unnumbered image/s, the archivist has noted the relationship by……. No#oil1 ‘California 1906 oil derricks’ – some emulsion damage, 1906 and No#oil2 ‘California oil fields, 1906’ – emulsion damage around edge, 1906 and No#oil3 ‘California oil fields, 1906’ – emulsion loose at top edge, 1906.

If the image has no# and does not directly to another image the archivist has given it a number noting something distinctive, when possible, in the image, like this: No#bicycles man, two boys wearing hats by large, leafy tree, one with scooter, four bicycles – emulsion flaking off on side, bottom edges, undated.

At the time the photographer relied upon good outdoor light and did not use any type of flash bulbs. Therefore most of the images are taken outside on a sunny day in the summer, although there are some images taken on snowy days, and some images taken when the trees are bare, either early spring or late fall. A few outside hunting images were probably taken in early fall.

Only a few inside images exist, two inside a church, one inside a store, and a few of women or children inside a house or studio.

Most of the images involve people, buildings and events, mostly in Alger, Michigan. Individual and group portraits, a picnic, birthday party, a skating party, a baseball game, hunting, and family and neighbor gatherings predominate. Men, women, children, and babies and a railroad section crew of six men are documented. Buildings in Alger include the school, Kern’s store, a drug store, Post Office, Methodist Episcopal Church, now Alger United Methodist Church, land store, and other downtown buildings, houses, and barns. The Michigan Central Railroad tunnel and a bridge are included. Vehicles include horse drawn buggies, wagons, a child’s wagon, a truck, and a REO car, circa 1905-1906. Horses, a dog and a dead dear are documented.

Images probably or definitely not taken in Alger include Southern Pacific train and engine, the oil fields and derricks of California and an image of southwestern Indian village.

Physical condition notes: All the negatives measure 4x5 inches. Most of the glass-plate negatives are in overall good condition, although a number (as noted in their individual description) have some emulsion damage, usually along the edges, and a few have stains. Two have an edge broken off, one edge is missing, the other is in the negative sleeve. One glass plate (#828) is bright yellow in color. The jewelry box has been crushed to close further than designed. It is rectangular, 6.5x4.25x1 inches, covered in purple velvet with a cream satin lining, undated.

Collection

Alice L. Gardner diary, 1886

1 volume

This partially printed, annual daily diary was kept by 12-13 year old Alice L. Gardner of Warren, Rhode Island, over the course of 1886. Her brief entries reflect on social matters, local news, church activities, games, school, dance, theater, and musical lessons.

Alice L. Gardner noted her family's travels to Providence, Boston, and other nearby locales, for social visits, shopping, and other matters. She remarked on her and her family's attendance of theatre and musical performances. While at times she only notes going to "the Opera," she occasionally names the performances. Some of the shows she mentioned include The Mikado (January 2), Francesca da Rimini (January 16), Victor, the Blue-Stocking (May 8), The Old Homestead (October 9), The Merry Wives of Windsor (October 27), and The Jilt (December 18).

Alice Gardner's entries relating to her schooling pertain to exercises, exams, absences of teachers and classmates, and more. At times she names the texts assigned to her for school work or pieces she was to learn for musical lessons. She noted playing piano, taking up banjo lessons, dancing, and singing. She also frequently mentioned playing games with family friends, including whist, backgammon, casino, among others.

The diary also includes brief mentions of notable events, such as the marriage of Grover Cleveland (June 2) and the Charleston earthquake (September 22). At least two entries reflect racial attitudes. Her entry for October 22nd described a party which included racial and ethnic costumes. Alice also noted when Le Bing, a Chinese man, opened a laundry (November 9).

The section for "Cash Accounts" at the back of the diary includes several entries, principally for October to December for purchases of candy, food, and ribbon. Several addresses are also included at the back of the volume, as well as one entry in the section to record letters received and answered.

Four disbound notebook pages are housed in the pocket at the back of the volume. They include a musical notation, mathematical notes, a tongue-twister about snuff, a list of birthdays, quotations and proverbs, and drawings. Drawings represent a six-pointed star, a small pig and donkey, clocks and wall hangings, and a "Newport Girl," "Crescent Park Girl," and "Boston Girl" wearing different styles of dress.

A clipping of hair bound in a pink ribbon and a sample of grass are laid in the volume.

Collection

Alicia A. and William G. Bakewell letters, 1845

3 items

This collection is made up of 3 letters exchanged by Alicia A. Bakewell and her husband, William G. Bakewell, in and around 1845. They discussed medical remedies and Alicia's health, Alicia's time with the Audubon family in New York City, and steamboat travel on the Ohio River.

This collection is made up of 3 letters exchanged by Alicia A. Bakewell and her husband, William G. Bakewell, in and around 1845. William wrote to Alicia on August 11, 1845, expressing his concerns about her recent medical complaints and discussing various courses of treatment; he strongly advised her not to take calomel and suggested that she adopt a different diet or take numerous baths to relieve her suffering. Alicia wrote twice to William. Her letter of August 19, 1845, responds to his concern about her illness, which had improved significantly despite lingering back pain, and contains news of the Audubon family, with whom she was staying in New York City. She also reported that bathing had been suspended on account of the presence of sharks. Alicia's undated letter regards her journey on an Ohio River steamer from Ohio to Pennsylvania. She mentioned the ship's propensity for running aground, a fellow passenger who was a musician, and her fear that people in Louisville would approach her husband with unfounded claims of debts against her.

Collection

Alma (Mich.) Miscellaneous Collection, 1918, 1935, and undated

.25 cubic foot (in 1 box, 1 Oversized folder)

This artificial collection consists of Alma (Mich.) miscellaneous.

The collection, 1918, 1935, and undated, includes internal business correspondence and purchase receipt documents for Gamble-Skogmo in the Great Lakes area. Additionally, there are documents pertaining to Alma Masonic Lodge Membership, which includes the application and acceptance certificate of Alma College’s President Harry Crooks. One oversized folder of photographic portraits of men (3), undated, unidentified completes the collection. This is an artificial collection of material found in an Alma (Mich.) building while it was being renovated.

Processing Note: .25 cubic foot of duplicates, including copies of materials from the Clarke, reading materials, and blank cards were removed from the collection during processing. Also, some documents were photocopied, the copies were retained and the originals were removed.

Collection

American National Red Cross. Isabella County Chapter (Mich.) Collection, 1917, 2014, and undated

.75 cubic foot (in 1 box, 1 Legal-sized folder)

This collection includes images, newspaper clippings and articles, financial records, reports, pamphlets, recognition materials, letters, and newsletters.

This is an addition to the American National Red Cross Isabella County Chapter (Mich.) Organizational Records collection. This collection includes images, newspaper clippings and articles, financial records, reports, pamphlets, recognition materials, letters, and newsletters. Of particular interest are: materials related to the Mount Pleasant Indian School, a poem about soldiers who fought in the Iraq War, and Hurricane Hugo relief efforts. Except for one legal-size folder, everything else in the collection is letter-size.

Processing Note: Approximately .25 cubic foot of materials was withdrawn from the collection during processing, including national publications, general Michigan materials, duplicates, and originals which were acidic or damaged. Photocopies of acidic or damaged materials were added to the collection. Some objects were transferred to the CMU Museum, including: a framed display of Red Cross pins, three miniature Red Cross vehicles, a nursing uniform with top, pants, and hat, two metal first aid boxes with supplies within them, and a few national publications.

Collection

American Tour photograph album, 1893

1 volume

The American Tour photograph album contains 96 Photographs of a tour taken of the United States and Canada, featuring the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago.

The American Tour photograph album (24 x 18 cm) contains 96 Photographs of a tour taken of the United States and Canada, featuring the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago. The photographic narrative follows a trip from Southampton, England, across the Atlantic to New York City; Richmond, Virginia; Chicago, Ill.; the Niagara region; Saratoga, New York; the Hudson River valley; and finally New York City and Coney Island, New York. Images from the trans-Atlantic trip include the dock at Southampton, the Steamship SS Paris at sea; the Sandy Hook pilot boat; views of the Statue of Liberty; and steerage passengers on an ocean liner. Several images of Richmond, Va., and rural homes in Amelia County, Va. appear. One view showing a three adults and one child on a wagon "leaving Sherwood" may be of the travelers. Numerous views of the Columbian Exposition grounds in Chicago are at the center of the album. Photographs of Niagara Falls and the Niagara River include an image of Clifford Calverley crossing the river on a tightrope. Other images include barges on both the Saint Lawrence Seaway and Hudson River; boating and scenery at Lake George; and ice houses and sailboats along the Hudson River. Photographs of New York City depict Wall Street; Brighton Beach and Coney Island; the Statue of Liberty; and Jersey City Ferry Boat "Orange." The album's half-bound brown cloth cover is stamped in gilt "American Tour. 1893."

Collection

Amherst, Massachusetts photograph album, 1934

1 volume

The Amherst, Massachusetts photograph album contains 13 photoprints taken in and around North Amherst, Mass., including images of churches, the post office, and parks. Also includes an image of the Amherst College campus and a photograph of a railroad bridge.

The Amherst, Massachusetts photograph album (18 x 26 cm) contains 13 photoprints taken in and around North Amherst, Mass., including images of churches, the post office, and parks. Also includes an image of the Amherst College campus and a photograph of a railroad bridge.

The album cover has black textured paper over boards, with gold printed title "Photographs," bound with string. Housed in a pale blue cardboard box.

Collection

Amis A. Madry letters, 1918

24 items

This collection is made up of 24 letters that Amis A. Madry wrote to his brother while serving in the United States Army at Camp Pike, Arkansas, during World War I. Madry commented on African American soldiers, influenza, and aspects of military life.

This collection is made up of 24 letters that Amis A. Madry wrote to his brother while serving in the United States Army at Camp Pike, Arkansas, during World War I. Madry commented on African American soldiers, influenza, and various aspects of military life.

Madry regularly corresponded with his brother throughout his military service, beginning just after his induction and ending shortly before his discharge. He wrote about daily life at the camp and provided some of his opinions on military life. Madry encouraged his brother to attempt to avoid army service, and discussed the possibility of his brother receiving an operation for an unspecified ailment. In some of his early letters, he mentioned his distaste for other enlisted men, whom he called "Rubes," and for African American soldiers. He shared anecdotes about an encounter with a "Yankee sergeant" who treated African Americans the same as white soldiers, and about interactions between white enlisted men and African American officers. In mid-1918, Madry's duties included training African American and white soldiers in drill exercises, as Camp Pike became a replacement center for troops headed overseas. During the fall of 1918, Madry's unit was quarantined after an outbreak of influenza; he later reported that several men from his unit had died during the epidemic. Madry occasionally wrote about his siblings, the draft, and war news. By December 1918, he anticipated his upcoming discharge from the military.

Collection

Amos A. Evans collection, 1812, 1813, 1833

3 volumes

The Amos A. Evans collection is comprised of 3 volumes: a "Prescription book of the U.S. Frigate Constitution," also known as "Old Ironsides" (1812); a "Daily Report of Cases in the Marine Barracks at the Navy Yard" at Charlestown, Massachusetts (1813); and a "Reefer's Log" written by Evan's son, Alexander Evans, during a trip from Maryland to Boston in 1833. These volumes provide an overview of the health of seamen aboard an American warship in 1812, along with the medical treatments of the day.

The Amos A. Evans collection is comprised of 3 volumes: a 266-page "Prescription book of the U.S. Frigate Constitution" (March 26-August 27, 1812); a 17-page "Daily Report of Cases in the Marine Barracks at the Navy Yard" at Charlestown, Massachusetts (1813); and a 33-page "Reefer's Log" written by Evan's son, Alexander Evans, during a trip from Maryland to Boston in 1833. The collection also contains 8 loose documents, located in the back of volume 1, including hospital expenditures, a medical supply inventory for the Constitution, and notes on the crew of the Independence.

Volume 1, entitled "The Daily Prescription Book on Board the Frigate Constitution," contains records of the daily treatments Evans prescribed for his patients, providing an overview of the health problems of seamen aboard a United States warship on the Atlantic coast during the War of 1812. Evans listed both in-patient and out-patient visits for each day, and recorded their names, complaints, diagnoses, and treatments. The most common entries relate to sexually transmitted diseases (often gonorrhea and syphilis), with diarrhea (gastroenteritis) being the next most common. Other complaints include delirium, opium overdose, epileptic convulsions and coughing up blood. In accord with the advice of Dr. Rush, Evans treated vomiting with an emetic, ipecac; diarrhea with a laxative, castor oil; and other complaints with bleeding, blistering and poultices. On average, Evans listed about 30 patient visits per day.

Evans witnessed the Constitution's encounter with the British ship, Guerrière, on August 19, 1812, one of the first sea battles of the War of 1812. Evans described in detail the injuries and treatment of five crew members and two officers wounded during the battle (pages 255-263).

At the back of the volume are 8 loose manuscripts:
  1. March 6, 1813: An inventory of medicine, instruments, and supplies for the Frigate Constitution.
  2. December 10-23, 1815: Expenditures of hospital food stores, signed S.D. Townsend.
  3. January 7-20, 1816: Expenditures of hospital food stores, signed by S.D. Townsend.
  4. January 16, 1816: Receipt of goods for the ship Independence.
  5. January 25-27, 1816: A medical report and autopsy on the treatment and death of William Oaty, who suffered as a result of the accidental discharge of a pistol.
  6. [1816]: A report on damages to the Independence.
  7. [1816]: Copy of accounts to George Bates for supplies for the Independence.
  8. April 9, 1846: A copy of a report from Evans to Commander Christopher Morris stating that John Wentworth was wounded on board the Constitution, on August 10, 1812. Evans also described his treatment of the injury.

Volume 2 is entitled "Daily Report of the Cases in the Navy Yard at Charleston." Covering from August 7-16, 1813, and spanning 17 pages, Evans recorded his treatments for cases of syphilis, gonorrhea, other venereal diseases, drunkenness, diarrhea, dysentery, scurvy, infections, coughs, injuries, and other ailments. Evans wrote down the name, symptoms, and treatment for each patient, and gave each a case number. He sometimes noted rank and whether or not the patient was a marine.

In the back of the book is a single case history of a man who punctured his lung from fractured ribs sustained from a fall off a wagon (July 18, 1818). Despite Dr. Evan's treatment of drawing more than five pints of blood over the ensuing five days, the patient recovered and was able to walk five miles by the end of the month. By this time, Dr. Evans had returned to private practice in Elkton, Maryland.

Scattered throughout the largely-blank interior of the book are six brief entries on plant and flower classification. These notes were written in a different hand and one entry is dated 1850.

Volume 3 is a 33-page travel log, entitled "A Reefer's Log," written by Alexander Evans, and addressed to his father, Amos Evans (September 7, 1833). Alexander Evans described his trip from the family home in Maryland to Boston by steamship and buggy, with stops along the way in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Evans wonders at the improvements in travel: "it is no longer necessary for one who goes from city to city to make his will...what used to be an immense journey 100 years ago[,] vis. From Maryland to Boston[,] but now is no more than a hop skip and jump" (page 1). He also described architecture, terrain, and people he encountered during the journey. In Boston, several old friends of his father's showed him the navy yard and the surrounding towns. Evans reported on the layout of the Charlestown navy yard as well as the interiors of the Constitution and the Independence (pages 10-11). He also toured a paper mill and wrote about the machinery in the factory (page 19). He visited Noah Webster (page 16), attended a Harvard commencement (page 25), and listened to a Boston glee club (page 20).

Collection

Amos Gould Family Papers, 1828, 1936, and undated

65 cubic feet (in 117 boxes, 3 oversized volumes)

The collection includes records of Amos, Ebenezer (Civil War correspondence), and Fred H. Gould of New York (State) and Owosso (Michigan).

The collection includes a variety of family records.

Amos Gould’s records include: personal correspondence, 1828-1872, family correspondence, 1875-1912, Civil War correspondence mostly from Ebenezer to Amos or Ebenezer’s wife and children, 1862-1864, railroad business records, 1852-1881, lumber business correspondence and papers, 1867-1882, business correspondence, 1849-1915, receipts of business transactions, 1830-1883, legal papers, including briefs, trail records, contracts land contracts, mortgages, agreements, indentures, and deeds, 1832-1885 from New York and Michigan, and more legal records and tax receipts, 1848-1932, book receipts, 1870-1879, trial records of cases Amos and his associates tried, 1842-1877, railroad receipts, 1857-1864, and letter books, day books, and account books, 1839-1935. Also included are five eagle buttons. Additional Amos Gould buttons are in the Display Items collection.

Papers relating to Ebenezer include: Civil War correspondence mostly from Ebenezer to Amos or Ebenezer’s wife and children, 1862-1864, courtship and marriage correspondence from Ebenezer to his wife Irene Beach, 1845-1866, and business correspondence and miscellaneous, including a scrapbook of obituaries and family news, 1868-1936.

Papers relating to Fred H. Gould include his diaries, 1892-1931, and personal correspondence to/from Fred, 1870-1872, and undated.

Overall the collection provides a good look at life in a small Michigan town (Owosso), multiple business interests, especially land and lumber, and personal life before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also letters from Gould’s brother-in-law, Dr. J. N. Graham, on early medical practices, such as the use of chloroform in Michigan.

Processing Notes: Due to size differences among the boxes, some boxes are shelved out of numerical orders. Boxes # 74-75, 108-120 are cubic foot boxes, the rest are .5 cubic foot boxes. Folder level processing was completed, but the inventory is at box level. Some materials are still tri-folded in their original wrappings, not in folders, or in unlabeled folders.

Collection

Andrew J. Duncan journal and orderly book, 1861; 1864-1865

157 pages (2 items)

Duncan's journal is a brief account of the earliest operations of the 23rd Ohio Infantry while serving in West Virginia in 1861. The orderly book contains copies of orders issued in 1864 and 1865 from the Headquarters of the Army of West Virginia and the Army of Shenandoah, including some signed by William McKinley.

Duncan's journal is a very well written, unfortunately brief account of the earliest operations of the 23rd Ohio, from its mustering in at Camp Chase through the first two months of its service in West Virginia. Even though the passages are generally short, they provide an excellent idea of the difficulties of operating in the mountainous country, and of the problems of poor training and discipline. There is a good second-hand description of the Battle of Rich Mountain, as well as two descriptions of the battlefield a month after the fact, and a long and detailed account of the Battle of Carnifex Ferry. As good as the battle descriptions, though, are his descriptions of the aftermath of Carnifex Ferry, particularly his powerful, grisly description of the expressions on the faces of corpses littering the battlefield.

The orderly book contains 35 routine carbon copies of orders issued late in the war from Headquarters of the Army of West Virginia and the Army of Shenandoah. The book was apparently originally William McKinley's, and many of the orders from Shenandoah are signed by him. Two orders are of some interest: one (in triplicate) dated April 27th, 1865, noting the capture of John Wilkes Booth, and the other, dated April 29th, reporting the surrender of Johnston's army to Sherman.

Duncan included four pencil sketches in his diary, 1) a rough sketch of a "Virginia secesh," 2) a view of Glenville, West Virginia, and sketches of the battlefields at 3) Rich Mountain and 4) Carnifex Ferry indicating troop placements, etc.

Collection

Andrew Robinson Giddinge diary, 1835

1 volume

Andrew Robinson Giddinge , a Pejepscot, Maine, innkeeper, kept this diary between January 1 and February 28, 1835. His descriptive entries pertain to everyday aspects of his life, such as household chores, Christian Bible reading, newspaper and periodical reading, hearing difficulties, trips to New Gloucester, and visits with friends and family. Giddinge filled the margins of this diary with numerous small sketches pertinent to their accompanying entries.

Andrew Robinson Giddinge, a Pejepscot, Maine, innkeeper, kept this diary between January 1 and February 28, 1835. His descriptive entries pertain to everyday aspects of his life, such as household chores, Christian Bible reading, newspaper and periodical reading, hearing difficulties, trips to New Gloucester, and visits with friends and family. Giddinge filled the margins of this diary with numerous small sketches pertinent to their accompanying entries.

Andrew Giddinge's frequent visits with neighbors and family, including Parsons in-laws and daughter Anna (married to Nathan Ingersoll), sometimes included helping neighbors with tasks such as chopping wood or shaving a disabled friend. He also recorded the illnesses and deaths of persons in his family and social circles. On January 6, 1835, Andrew took wheat to be ground in Lewiston for a "Graham" meal (Sylvester Graham's regimen was also used by a family he visited on January 14, 1835). His discussions of family dynamics included reflections on whether or not callers came to see him or his son's wife Deborah Tarbox Giddinge, and whether or not he was "at home" or merely enjoying the hospitality of others. Giddinge also commented regularly on postal deliveries, with hopes for letters from his son George, who lived in Kentucky. He discussed different periodicals and interspersed quotes from works he read.

His descriptive entries include weather notations, and small sketches related to the day's entries fill the margins. Among the illustrations are razors, scissors, irons, buckets, a casket, manicules, clothing, people warming feet in hot water, clothes being washed, barrels, the moon, a mole, a musical instrument, an ax and grinder, kettles, wash tubs, baking and food, a goat, letters, logs being pulled, a butchered calf and a fish, a hearth, an umbrella, a heart with arrows, a copy of an illustration of scene from Tristram Shandy, and others.

Collection

Andrew S. Clark Correspondence, 1862, 2012, and undated

1 cubic foot (in 2 boxes, 1 Oversized folder)

The majority of the correspondence is between Andrew and his extended family and friends, 1862-1865, but other materials date to 2012, or are undated.

The collection is composed mainly of correspondence between Andrew and his extended family written mostly between 1862 and 1865. There is also a letter from 1867 and several which are undated. The majority of the correspondence is between Andrew and Eliza, with correspondence to/from Amara. The majority of the letters concerns farm life and what to do on the farm. Of particular note is a letter dated Sept. 17, 1864 from Seymour Clark to Amara Bachelder from a Camp near Atlanta, Georgia, describing the siege of Atlanta. There is one folder devoted to writings and poems written or copied by Andrew while he served during the Civil War. In the Miscellaneous No Name folder there is a poem called “Love Letter to a Soldier.” The Oversized folder includes newspaper clippings and a bounty form for Andrew. The first folder in the collection contains biographical information on the above mentioned people. Illustrations are limited to letterhead.

Collection

Andrew T. Goodrich family correspondence, 1802, 1810-1813, 1816

7 items

Seven letters exchanged by members of the Goodrich family primarily concern news from New Haven, Connecticut, in the early 19th century. Andrew T. Goodrich, a publisher in New York City, also provided his mother and sister with thoughts on his church and recent War of 1812 victory celebrations.

Seven letters exchanged by members of the Goodrich family primarily concern news from New Haven, Connecticut, in the early 19th century. Andrew T. Goodrich, a publisher in New York City, received 3letters and 1 fragment from his mother Eunice and sister Sarah, and wrote 1 letter each to Sarah and his mother. Eunice Goodrich also wrote 1 letter to Andrew's sister Frances.

Andrew's incoming correspondence includes a 3-page letter from his sister Sarah M. Goodrich, in which she presented her opinions on an unidentified mutual acquaintance (August 4, 1810). She wrote of her high regard for the man, influenced by his mannerisms and religious views, and expressed her pleasure upon hearing that her brother felt the same way. She also included a brief poem. In a second letter, (September 21-25, 1816), Sarah described activities on board the the sloop Franklin as she traveled from a New York harbor up the Hudson River. Andrew's mother Eunice (2 pages) shared social news from New Haven, Connecticut, where his family continued to live after he moved to New York City. Eunice Goodrich addressed an additional letter (1 page, written in 1802) to her daughter Frances ("Fanny"), and lamented the death of her son Charles. Andrew also received a copied fragment of a letter regarding his brother's death.

Andrew T. Goodrich's letter to his mother concerned a recent business opportunity, and the effects of their separation (November 16, 1811). In a letter dated October 24, 1813, Andrew discussed a recent sermon by John Brodhead Romeyn; a potential substitute preacher, Alexander McLeod, who would only preach if they permitted him to use a Scottish psalter (Goodrich noted he would rather sell his pew and quit the church); and celebrations of recent War of 1812 victories.

Collection

Andrew Turnbull collection, 1786

4 items

This collection of four letters relate to the post-Revolutionary War reputation of Dr. Andrew Turnbull, founder of the New Smyrna colony in East Florida. They were principally written by former Governor of East Florida Patrick Tonyn to British officials and include opposition to Turnbull receiving a government salary.

Please see the Contents List for individual item descriptions.

Collection

"An Exhortation to Peace Under the American Revolution" penmanship exercise, 1783

1 volume

This bound manuscript contains the text of a sermon delivered in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in December 1783, about a desirable political future of the United States from a Christian point of view.

This bound manuscript contains the text of a sermon delivered in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in December 1783, about a desirable political future of the United States from a Christian point of view. The 31-page volume, entitled "An Exhortation to Peace under the American Revolution, addressed to the Inhabitants of Lancaster in the State of Pennsylvania, December 11, 1783," is divided into several sections, each copied by a distinct, clear hand and signed, though the text runs unbroken throughout the book. The first page of the address indicates that it is based on Jeremiah 24:7, and it begins by examining the situation of the Jews in ancient Babylon, and comparing that to the situation that led to the American colonies' fight for independence. From there, the sermon continues to expound upon religious and political themes, encouraging a "cordial union among the members of each particular state, as well as among the United States in general" and arguing that a Christian ethos would serve as a strong foundation for the new nation. The treatise weaves together themes of Christian faith and contemporary politics to create a vision of a positive future for the United States.

Collection

Ann Arbor (Mich.) Merchant's account book, 1833, 1849 (majority within 1849)

1 volume

This volume contains the double-entry bookkeeping records of a merchant based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1849. The unidentified merchant sold a variety of goods to customers in and around Ann Arbor, Pittsfield, Whitmore Lake, Webster, and Hamburg, Michigan.

This volume (8" x 12", 145 pages) contains the double-entry bookkeeping records of a merchant based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1849. The unidentified merchant sold a variety of goods to customers in and around Ann Arbor, Pittsfield, Whitmore Lake, Webster, and Hamburg, Michigan. Most pages contain running accounts for specific individuals, with debits and credits noted in two columns. Notes along the margins of many pages indicate the customer's specific location in eastern Washtenaw County or southern Livingston County.

Though the merchant most often recorded sales of "sundries," the accounts occasionally specify items such as hats, shoes, coffee, ribbon, a broom, and sugar. Occasionally, he paid for errors made in previous bills. Customers paid in cash or in kind, most frequently with foodstuffs or items of clothing and sometimes with more unusual items, including a horse and buggy (p. 14). One note concerns a boarder named Carpenter who moved into a home in late August 1849 (p. 97). Though the merchant most frequently dealt with men, the ledger documents accounts with a few women and several firms. A fragment from a letter to Charles W. Butler concerning unsold land, dated January 19, 1833, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is laid into the volume between pages 144 and 145.

Collection

Annie E. L. Hobbs journal, 1876

31 pages

Annie E. L. Hobbs, of Laconia, New Hampshire, wrote this journal during her trip to the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. In detailed passages, she described the various exhibit halls visited and her reactions to the sights of Philadelphia and the spectacle of the exhibition.

Aware that she would be taking part in an historic event, Annie Hobbs decided to keep a record of her trip to the Centennial Exhibition, and she filled 31 pages with her account, which she titled, "Wayside notes to the Centennial." Although her description of the contents of Hall after Hall is slightly repetitive, Annie is often specific -- and humorous -- about what she is seeing. In the Women's Pavilion, for instance, she saw Martha Washington's slippers, feather flowers, and "a novelty -- in the form of a woman's face made of Butter -- we have often heard of Dough faces but never before of a Butter face" (p. 6). In addition to providing detailed information about the exhibits, this account also shows a woman from the country's reactions to the big city and the exciting spectacle of the exhibition.

From the moment she arrived, Annie was happy she had come: "As I gazed at the various Buildings on the outside -- before seeing their interior, I felt that this view alone would pay for the trip, so colossal in their proportions -- so beautiful in their design and finish that one can only behold and admire" (pp. 4-5). Attending the exhibition also reinforced her patriotic sentiments. Even after appreciating the foreign exhibits, she would reiterate how magnificent "our own" had been and how proud she was of her country's achievements. Touring Independence Hall also fired up her enthusiasm: "While visiting these interesting, time worn relics, a feeling of awe and reverence came over us -- They seemed sacred inasmuch as they had been owned and handled by those great and good men" (p. 19). Annie was also impressed that even in the throngs of people, a "uniform politeness and courtesy had seemed to be possessed both by visitors and officers and servants in the various departments" (p. 28).

Annie did have some predictable complaints, shared by tourists of all eras. Sore feet, fatigue, and overpriced souvenirs all annoyed her, but did not interfere unduly with her enjoyment of the exhibition. Having to rely on restaurants for food was another obstacle, and Annie retained her sense of humor while recording all of the terrible food they ate, including watery oyster stew and bad pickles. She was also saddened by the news that their church back home had burned during their absence. By the time her party boarded the train for home, she was suffering from a severe cold, and was glad to finally arrive there two days later.

Collection

Anthony H. Hoskins letter books, 1860-1861, 1869-1872

2 volumes

This collection is made up of 2 letter books, which contain over 270 secretarial copies of Captain Anthony H. Hoskins's official outgoing correspondence. His letters pertain to service aboard the H.M.S. Hecate (May 22, 1860-January 1, 1861), H.M.S. Plumper (January 1-July 2, 1861) and the H.M.S. Eclipse (July 20, 1869-September 27, 1871, and September 25, 1871-October 20, 1872) in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Hoskins corresponded with superior officers and fellow captains about his ships' movements, personnel, upkeep, and orders. P.H.W. Mayow and Henry F. Nicholson, acting captains on the Eclipse, wrote the letters dated between July 20, 1869, and September 20, 1869.

This collection is made up of 2 letter books, which contain over 270 secretarial copies of Captain Anthony H. Hoskins's official outgoing correspondence. His letters pertain to service aboard the H.M.S. Hecate (May 22, 1860-January 1, 1861), H.M.S. Plumper (January 1-July 2, 1861), and the H.M.S. Eclipse (July 20, 1869-September 27, 1871, and September 25, 1871-October 20, 1872) in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Hoskins corresponded with superior officers and fellow captains about his ships' movements, personnel, upkeep, and orders. P.H.W. Mayow and Henry F. Nicholson, acting captains on the Eclipse, wrote the letters dated between July 20, 1869, and September 20, 1869.

Hoskins wrote his first letters from the Hecate while stationed at Woolwich and other English ports between May and July 1860. The ship then traveled to Madeira and, after rounding Cape Horn, to the Pacific Ocean, where it spent time at Valparaíso, Chile, and the Hawaiian Islands. In his letters to Commodore James R. Drummond and other officers, he reported on aspects of the ship's daily operation, including its arrival at different ports and travels around the Pacific. He frequently informed his superiors about disciplinary measures for the sailors onboard, and often mentioned financial reports, which are not copied into the volume. On January 1, 1861, Hoskins transferred to the Plumper, which traveled from near Esquimalt, British Columbia, back to Valparaíso, around Cape Horn to Rio de Janeiro, and finally to Portsmouth, England, where he arrived in June. In addition to reports on disciplinary measures, changes in rank, and ship movements, the commander's letters include content respecting the search for information about the missing gunboat Forward and the lost crew of the Charles Tupper. A 4-page report respecting the Forward documents interactions with the crew of the trading yacht Templar and with Nootka (Nuu-chah-nulth) natives in November and December 1860. A 2-page letter provides a summary of the Plumper's search for information about the Charles Tupper near the Straits of Magellan (April 22, 1861). Although they discovered the shipwreck, the fate of the crew remained ambiguous. The commander wrote that they probably did not take refuge with Indians and that they likely perished while attempting to reach a settlement.

The remainder of Volume 1 (roughly 3/4 of the volume) and the entirety of Volume 2 were composed while the Eclipse served in the Caribbean and along the eastern Canadian coast between September 1869 and October 1872. The first letters in Volume 2 are attributed to P. H. W. Mayow and Henry F. Nicholson, and relate to the recent sudden death of the ship's commander, Captain Harvey. Hoskins assumed command in late September 1869. The Eclipse spent much of its time at Barbados, the Bahamas, Bermuda, Halifax, St. John's, and other ports. In letters addressed to superior officers and colonial governors, Hoskins reported on the ship's sailors, courts martial and other disciplinary actions (for desertion, theft, drunkenness, etc.), ship movements, repairs, and daily operations. Hoskins served as a regional commander in the Caribbean, and some of his letters are sailing orders for subordinate captains. One such order is a response to a request from Belize, British Honduras, for assistance against an attack by natives (May 3, 1870). Others report interactions with French, Spanish, American, and other ships (including prizes). Though the volumes overlap slightly, only one letter is common between them.

A copy of a recommendation letter Hoskins wrote for David O'Sullivan is laid into the first volume (October 11, 1872).

Collection

A Pleasant Excursion or a Trip to Niagara manuscript, 1825

1 volume

This slim volume contains a partial account of a trip from New York City to Niagara Falls in August 1825, with entries cutting off abruptly at Lockport, New York. The currently unidentified writer traveled on the incomplete Erie Canal aboard the safety barge Lady Clinton and by road on the last leg of their journey. The author included descriptions of scenery, geographic features, towns, and canal systems they passed. Within the volume are calligraphic headings, pressed leaves, and a color illustration of two birds and flowers.

This slim volume contains a partial account of a trip from New York City to Niagara Falls in August 1825, with entries cutting off abruptly at Lockport, New York. The currently unidentified writer traveled on the incomplete Erie Canal aboard the safety barge Lady Clinton and by road on the last leg of their journey. The author included descriptions of scenery, geographic features, towns, and canal systems they passed. Within the volume are calligraphic headings, pressed leaves, and a color illustration of two birds and flowers.

Major points of the route serve as headings within the volume, being visually differentiated from the main text by calligraphic headings. Observations on town layouts and architecture—including rough estimations of population count—provide a developmental snapshot of the region as perceived by the writer. Also mentioned is the construction on the Mt. Pleasant Prison at Sing Sing [Sing Sing Prison, Ossining, New York] and the quarry of white marble used by the builders.

The writer's travel by road was apparently not as easy as their travel by canal. After turning off the Ridge Road at Hartland, New York, descriptions of the woodland seem to indicate a host of obstructions in the form of mudholes, ruts, and stumps (p. 22). Apart from the entries on towns and landscapes, the writer noted a hotel landlord in Victor, New York, who kept two wolves, two small deer, and a fox in his yard (p. 16).

Yellowed imprints of larger leaves placed into the volume can be found on later pages, but only the smallest have lasted to the present day.

Collection

Apollo 11 Moon Mission commentary, 1969

1 item

This volume of typed commentary is a transcript of the audio between Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Mission Control in Houston, Texas, documenting the moon landing of Apollo 11 (July 20, 1969, 20:34 CDT to 22:31 CDT). Produced as a resource for reporters, it provides an in-depth look at the preparation for lunar landing and the initial moments on the Moon's surface.

This volume of typed commentary is a transcript of the audio between Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Mission Control in Houston, Texas, documenting the moon landing of Apollo 11 (July 20, 1969, 20:34 CDT to 22:31 CDT). Produced as a resource for reporters, it provides an in-depth look at the preparation for lunar landing and the initial moments on the Moon's surface. Protocols for spacecraft operation, communication, and navigation were discussed, as well as the geography and terrain of the Moon, and instructions for astronaut movements and tasks.

Collection

Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery journal, 1873

1 volume

The Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery journal chronicles the future British Prime Minister's travels in the United States in 1873. Rosebery visited New York City, Salt Lake City, Chicago, Ottawa, Montréal, and Boston.

The Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, journal chronicles Rosebery's travels through the United States in 1873. He began the journal on October 1, 1873, in New York City, with a detailed description of his journey to the United States from London, via Dublin, on the Russia, "supposed to be the fastest of the Cunard ships" (p. 3). He related his experiences in detail, including a particularly vivid description of the New York Stock Exchange during the Panic of 1873 (p. 12). On October 7, Rosebery prepared to depart New York for Salt Lake City, which he reached by train five days later. During the journey, he described places and scenery, including Chicago and the Platte River (pp. 31-42). On October 14, he met Brigham Young (p. 57), and he remained in Utah until the 16th of that month. Following another transcontinental train voyage, Rosebery stayed in Chicago for two days, then left for Niagara Falls and Ottawa, Canada (pp. 79-109). He remained in Canada until November 5 (pp. 109-118), when he departed for Boston and New York (pp. 118-125). Aside from a weeklong visit to Washington, D. C., from December 2-10 (pp. 183-206), he remained in New York for the rest of his American tour. He returned to Europe on the Russia in mid-December (pp. 224-254).

Rosebery peppered his journal with descriptions and occasional commentary, but focused primarily on specific experiences and conversations. The earl met many prominent Americans during his stay in North America, including senators, Supreme Court justices, and other political figures, and described a lecture given in Brooklyn by Henry Ward Beecher (pp. 143-147). Beecher did not impress the Englishman, who called him "a buffoon without the merits of a buffoon. He has neither force nor ornateness of diction," though "after…I was introduced to him…in conversation he impressed me more favourably" (pp. 146-147). During his time in Washington, D.C., Rosebery saw "the original draught of the Declaration of Independence in Jefferson's handwriting" and a number of other important historical artifacts, and shared his opinion of a George Washington portrait (p. 202). Other notable experiences in New York included a visit to a trial, to the Tombs prison (pp. 28-30), and to "the Girls' Normal School" (p. 151).

Collection

Architectural papers, 1913, 1997, and undated

10.5 cubic feet (in 2 boxes, 6 Oversized boxes)

The papers consist mainly of drawings, blueprints, tracings, elevations, building specifications, and biographical materials.

The collection is organized by format and size. Box 1 consists of tracings, Box 2 mostly of tracings. Boxes 3-8 are rolled blueprints and architectural drawings (8.5 cubic feet). Each rolled drawing may include: building blueprints, tracings, elevations, and other related architectural drawings. These are housed in large telescope style boxes. Box 9-10 include one folder of biographical materials and building specifications. All of the materials are in good condition. Some of the specifications suffer from being stored rolled around the blueprints and are somewhat bent out of shape. The strength of the collection is obviously the drawings and building specifications. Materials vary in size and were boxed by size to fit into as few boxes as possible.

Collection

Architecture Militaire, [1700s?]

1 volume

The Architecture Militaire is a single manuscript volume that provides instructions for the construction of a fortified building in the shape of a star. The volume consists primarily of prose description, but also includes a series of 16 illustrative plates showcasing detailed architectural drawings.

The Architecture Militaire is a single manuscript volume that provides instructions for the construction of a fortified building in the shape of a star. The volume consists primarily of prose description, but also includes a series of 16 illustrative plates showcasing detailed architectural drawings. The drawings are signed "A Toulouse chez Baour." The book has 12 chapters about construction methods, including lists of potential problems with suggested remedies. The volume includes discussions and critiques of existing construction methods, including those of the ancient French, the Dutch, the Comte de Pagan, Vauban, and others (chapter 11). The final chapter, entitled "Idee generalle de l'attaque d'une place et de la maniere de fortifier un camp," contains equations relevant to fort construction. The final section of the book consists of detailed ink drawings similar, but not identical to, those found in Samuel Marolois's Fortification ou Architecture Militaire Tant Offensive que Deffensive. These show different aspects of construction relevant to the text and include one page illustrating various military paraphernalia.

Collection

A Relation of the different Military Operations since the Year 1755, [after 1758]

1 volume

This volume is an English translation of a French account of military affairs during the Seven Years' War, primarily from 1756-1757 on the border between New York and Canada.

The full title of this manuscript reads, "A Relation of the different Military Operations since the Year 1755 & amongst others taking of Fort St. George in No. America--From a French Manuscript taken upon the Surrender of Louisberg in 1758." Containing 28 pages of writing, this volume is an English translation of a French account of military affairs during the Seven Years' War, primarily from 1756-1757 on the border between New York and Canada.

The account begins with a short reflection on the English Fort St. George [Fort William Henry], the strategic advantages gained by the French upon gaining control of it, and English losses during the war. The narrative continues with detailed descriptions of French military actions from January 21, 1757, with the Battle on Snowshoes near Fort Carillon and Fort St. Frédéric, through an attempt on Fort William Henry in March 1757. The account highlights French command, Native American military participation, and the strategic focus on forts, watercraft, and communication lines.

The section entitled "Advantages gain'd over the English in July 1756" details reconnaissance efforts concerning the English Fort St. George [Fort William Henry] and Fort Lydius [Fort Edward], naval engagements, and military encounters with British forces.

The manuscript continues with "An Account of the Taking Fort St. George--(or Fort William Henry," from the engagement's commencement in late July 1757 to the English surrender on August 9. Copies of the articles of capitulation, correspondence between Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and the British commander of the Fort, George Monro (ca. 1700-1757), and intercepted British correspondence are included. In his letters Montcalm uses his inability to "restrain the Savages" as a plea for the fort's surrender. The author mentions French attempts to counter Native American "Fury," a reference to cannibalism, and Native American military support of both English and French troops.

A copy of an unattributed letter from Quebec, from August 17, 1757, describes "particulars relating to the Government of this Country, which is the Theater, and Primum, Mobile of the War." This letter details naval operations around Quebec and Louisbourg, as well as the state of local provisions, troops, and morale.

The "Account of the Damage our fleet sustain'd from the Gale of Wind and the yet Greater, sustain'd by the English Squadron" describes operations against Isle Royale [Cape Breton Island], English timidity in regards to the French fleet, and the damage both navies suffered during a heavy storm. This account likely references the 1757 Louisbourg expedition and the fleet under Francis Holburne's (1704-1771) command that was damaged in a storm on September 24. This account also reflects on Native American warfare, noting incidents of scalping.

The volume closes with a "List of the French Ships of War under Mr. du Bois de la Mothe," referencing the ships under the command of Emmanuel-Auguste de Cahideuc, Comte DuBois de la Motte (1683-1764). The list includes the names of the ships, number of guns, and commanders.

Collection

Arithmetic copybook, [19th century]

1 volume

This arithmetic copybook was compiled by an anonymous student in the nineteenth century. It includes rules and examples for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, as well as practical examples relating to money and weights and measures.
Collection

Arnold Bransdorfer Papers and Audiotapes, 1930, 1971, and undated

approximately 2 cubic feet (in 2 boxes, 1 Oversized folder)

Papers include mostly photographs, negatives and audiotapes of 19th century people, architecture, farms, churches, probably in rural Michigan, and 1960s Michigan politicians, political events and gatherings.

Most of the collection is photographs and negatives. The 19th century photographs have been reshot by a modern camera. Subject headings of photographs were ones used by Arnold Bransdorfer. Some photographs are quite faded. Almost all of the photographs are black and white.

Among these are images of what is presumably rural Michigan and many photographs of Michigan Republicans and Republican political gatherings in the 1960s. There is one photograph of Robert Kennedy at a political gathering.

Related Michigan Republican political publications, news releases, and a statement are among the paper materials. The correspondence discusses some of the photography work Arnold Bransdorfer did as Michigan Senate Photographer. Michigan Republicans documented here include William Milliken, G. Mennen Williams, George Romney, and Guy Vander Jagt, among others.

The audiotapes, mostly 1965-1968, and undated, relate largely to Michigan political press conferences, speeches, and advertisements, although Richard Nixon is documented at an unspecified time, as well as a speech by Walter Reuther in 1967. Different genres of music are also recorded on the audiotapes.

Collection

Art and Geography Teacher's Book, Undated

1 volume

This volume, which may have belonged to a Scottish teacher, contains pencil drawings of everyday objects and notes related to instruction in art and geography.

This volume, which may have belonged to a Scottish teacher, has pebbled covers, with the title "Sketch Book" stamped in gold on the front. The first section, "Specimen course for Second Year Higher Grade," contains 6 pages of pencil drawings. The subjects include books, plants, household items, a shoe, a water tank, an umbrella, a broom, a basket, and a hand. The final page of drawings includes the note: "Complete course with interiors & outdoor work."

The second part of the volume is a 2-page chart titled "Geography. Scheme of Work," with tables of geographical subjects for students at various levels. Each month's course included the study of a country or geographical region, a "practical" subject, and a "physical" subject. The areas represented are primarily European nations; British colonies such as South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and India; North and South America; Asia, and Pacific islands. The teacher offered practical instruction in navigational concepts, the use and creation of maps, and surveying, and offered instruction on various geological topics such as the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and physical features such as volcanoes and glaciers.

Collection

Arthur B. Silverman letters, 1944

5 items

This collection consists of 5 letters that Private Arthur B. Silverman wrote to his parents in Hartford, Connecticut, while training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California, in August and September 1944. He discussed the importance of training, the Jewish New Year, and guard duty, among other subjects.

This collection consists of 5 letters that Private Arthur B. Silverman wrote to his parents in Hartford, Connecticut, while training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California, in August and September 1944. He described the Browning Automatic Rifle, rifle training, and guard duties; commented on the uncertainty of getting a furlough and the difficulty of making a cross-country telephone call; mentioned a USO show that included a performance by African-American minstrels; and noted a recent forest fire. In letters postmarked September 18, 1944, and September 24, 1944, Silverman apologized for not properly observing Rosh Hashanah but explained the high value that he placed on training, arguing that poor preparation had caused military personnel to be killed in the theaters of war and explaining that he had to follow orders.

Collection

Arthur Welch letters, 1916

0.25 linear feet

This collection consists of letters, postcards, and photographs related to Private Arthur E. Welch of the United States Army, who served with the 1st Regiment, Company L, in and around Nogales, Arizona, between July and October 1916. Welch discussed everyday life along the United States-Mexico border, his work in a military ice house, and developments in the region's military conflicts.

This collection consists of 100 letters, 2 postcards, and several photographs related to Private Arthur E. Welch of the United States Army, who served with the 1st Regiment, Company L, in and around Nogales, Arizona, between July and October 1916. Welch wrote his first 2 letters to his mother, Mrs. M. J. Welch of Willimantic, Connecticut, while in training at Niantic, Connecticut, about his life in camp. His next 5 letters recount his journey to Nogales, Arizona, and describe the scenery in Ohio, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico.

The bulk of the collection consists of Welch's daily letters to his mother from July 4, 1916-October 2, 1916, about his experiences while stationed in Nogales, Arizona. He reported news of recent military developments, commented on his accommodations in camp, and discussed several aspects of his life in the army, including his training, his work in an ice house, and his attendance at Catholic religious services. He also described the area and discussed a lengthy march his unit made to Fort Huachuca, Arizona, where he remained for much of August. Welch occasionally mentioned relations with the Mexicans and their independence celebrations on September 16, as well as the actions of Pancho Villa. One of his friends, Ed Ryan, wrote a letter to Mrs. Welch about his experiences after being wounded in the arm; he also mentioned Arthur's work in the ice house (September 21, 1916). By early October 1916, Welch began to anticipate his return to the East Coast. Two photographic postcards depict Arthur E. Welch in uniform and in a pair of overalls.

The non-correspondence items are 1 photograph of a group of soldiers, as well as 3 scrapbook pages containing 31 photographs of Nogales, Arizona, and United States soldiers in uniform and at leisure.

Collection

Asian Scrolls Collection, 1046 B.C.E.-1915 C.E. (majority within 618 C.E.-1644 C.E.)

56 items

The Asian Scrolls collection is comprised of 56 facsimile handscrolls and books of Japanese and Chinese origin. The scrolls depict landscapes and animals, as well as scenes from famous works and stories. Among the scrolls are also examples of the calligraphy of famous artists, such as Kobo-Daishi. The originals were created throughout the Tang, Sung, and Ming dynasties.

The Asian Scrolls collection is composed of 56 facsimile handscrolls and books of Japanese and Chinese origin. The scrolls depict landscapes, animals, and scenes from famous works and stories. Among the scrolls are examples of the calligraphy of famous artists, such as Kobo-Daishi. The original scrolls were created throughout the Tang, Sung, and Ming dynasties. This collection contains copies of the Japanese work “Ippen Shomin Ekotoba” and “Letter to Saicho” and the Chinese work “Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace." As these scrolls are reproductions, the originals are housed in other institutions such as the British Museum, Beijing’s Palace Museum, and Honolulu’s Academy of Arts. Four of the scrolls are of Chinese artwork but have been reproduced by the Japanese, and therefore, the artist’s names have been translated differently.

Mixed within the collection is a series of approximately five books. The leaves of the books are connected in an alternating format, creating an accordion style book. While many of the books contain artwork depicting scenes of natures and scenes from famous works, one book contains photographs of bronze Chinese objects. The photographs have titles but the book is untitled.

Collection

Atlantic City Photograph Album, 1914

approximately 90 photographs in 1 album.

The Atlantic City photograph album contains approximately 90 photographs related to an unidentified couple and their daughter, Jane, during a trip to Atlantic City in April and May of 1914.

The Atlantic City photograph album contains approximately 90 photographs related to an unidentified couple and their daughter, Jane, during a trip to Atlantic City in April and May of 1914. The album (18.5 x 27 cm) is bound in hand-painted varnished leather on paper boards with wood overlay. Images of particular interest include views of horseback riding on the beach, strolling on the boardwalk, and riding in rolling chairs and a pony-drawn cart. Atlantic City is seen largely as a backdrop to family activities. Additional photographs show the young girl sledding and with toys and friends at home. Also includes a photograph of Eleanor R. and Frederick D. Countiss and their daughter, Henrietta, in a studio portrait.

Collection

At Peace Street photograph album, 1900

1 volume

The At Peace Street photograph album contains 14 photographs of upper middle class home and family in Providence, R.I. Possibly the home of Linwood O. Towne, who inscribed the volume to the Prescotts in 1900. Several images of family members reading and photographs featuring the family cat.

The At Peace Street photograph album (16 x 23 cm) contains 14 photographs of upper middle class home and family in Providence, R.I. Possibly the home of Linwood O. Towne, who inscribed the volume to the Prescotts in 1900. Several images of family members reading and photographs featuring the family cat.

The album has brown burlap covers with inscribed title "At Peace Street," bound with string, and is housed in a gray wrapper with dark brown cloth spine.

Collection

August F. W. Partz letters, 1864

16 items

The August F. W. Partz letters pertain to Partz's experiences while living and traveling in New York, Ohio, and western Illinois during the Civil War. Partz, a mining engineer, discussed a business opportunity in Santa Fe, guerilla warfare and attacks on trains traveling through the Midwest, and military news from Missouri.

This collection contains 16 letters that mining engineer August F. W. Partz wrote to his business partner, C. Elton Buck, between May 16, 1864, and October 31, 1864. Partz wrote from the Mamakating Mine in New York (3 items); Cleveland, Ohio (2 items); and Quincy, Illinois (11 items). The letters are drafts or writer-retained copies; some pages have more than one letter written on them.

Some of Partz's letters pertain to his business interests, particularly regarding a mining opportunity in Santa Fe, New Mexico; he also mentioned the possibility of bringing German laborers to the United States to work with nickel (October 3, 1864). Most of Partz's correspondence concerns his attempts to travel from New York to Santa Fe via Cleveland, Ohio, and Missouri. He spent October 1864 in Quincy, Illinois, waiting for an opportune moment to continue his journey, which had been rendered dangerous by guerilla attacks on trains in Missouri. Partz discussed the opinions of Missouri and Kansas residents and refugees, attacks on passenger trains, and military developments in Missouri, especially those related to General Sterling Price. For a time, Partz considered traveling to the Southwest by way of California. In one letter, he mentioned his fear of Native American hostility (October 1, 1864).

Collection

Augustus Herbert Gansser Papers, 1891, 1931, and undated

approximately 5 cubic feet (in 2 boxes, 3 Oversized volumes, 9 Oversized folders)

The papers include Augustus Gansser's biographical materials, speeches, correspondence, American Expeditionary Field materials, Michigan National Guard scrapbooks, Prohibition articles, and United Spartans of America materials. Also included are papers of his brother, Emil B. Gansser, and photographs of World War I, National Guard, and Spanish-American War veterans.

The collection richly documents Gansser’s experiences in the Michigan National Guard and veterans associations, as well as lists of Michigan soldiers killed in actions and troop rosters. The collection has a wide variety of photographs of encampments, officers, and units (group) photographs.

Michigan National Guard troops documented in this collection include: the 63rd Infantry; 125th Infantry; 32nd Division; 1st Battalion, 33rd Infantry, Company B; 119th and 120th Field Artillery, 32nd Division Band; and the 3rd Battalion, 125th Infantry. Camp MacArthur; Waco, Texas; the Division Headquarters for the 125th-128th infantries is also documented, as well as some general orders and circulars.

Gansser’s political career is documented in his Political Correspondence, 1905-1915, Correspondence and “Letters to the Editor,” 1911, and Correspondence from his Constituents, 1929. There is also Correspondence from Michigan Governor Fred M. Warner and Michigan Representative George A. Loud. A few drafts of his political Addresses (Speeches), 1911-1915, are also included in the collection.

Gansser’s activities in veterans groups, his non-political business interests, family correspondence, and two scrapbooks that belonged to his brother, Emil B. Gansser, complete the collection.

Collection

Aulder Watt correspondence, 1917

13 items

This collection is made up of 12 letters that Private Aulder M. Watt received and 1 letter that he wrote while serving with Company H of the 10th Regiment, Illinois National Guard, at Camp Lincoln, Illinois, in 1917. Olive Stone, his fiancée, wrote 11 of the letters from her home in Clinton, Illinois, about their separation, and an aunt composed 1 letter concerning family news. Watt's letter to Olive pertains to his wages and recent labor strikes.

This collection is made up of 12 letters that Private Aulder M. Watt received and 1 letter that he wrote while serving with Company H of the 10th Regiment, Illinois National Guard, at Camp Lincoln, Illinois, in 1917. Olive Stone, his fiancée, wrote 11 of the letters from her home in Clinton, Illinois, about their separation, and an aunt composed 1 letter concerning family news. Watt's letter to Olive pertains to his wages and recent labor strikes.

Olive's often lengthy letters focus on local news, her love for Aulder, and her loneliness. She discussed the possibility of meeting him, either while visiting the Illinois State Fair or when he returned home on furlough. She occasionally reacted to news of his life in the military camp, and expressed her fear that he would be injured in the line of duty. Aulder received 1 letter from an unidentified aunt (September 28, 1917), and wrote 1 letter to his fiancée, in which he discussed recent labor strikes and his upcoming payment schedule.

Collection

A Week Among the Mosquitoes photograph album, 1896

1 Volume

A Week Among the Mosquitoes photograph album (16 x 10.5 cm) contains snapshots from a July 1896 camping trip on the White River near Mt. Carmel, Indiana.

A Week Among the Mosquitoes photograph album (16 x 10.5 cm) contains 26 snapshots on 52 pages, with humorous inscriptions on many images. Six are landscapes, four are snapshots of the campsite, and sixteen are of the men camping, hunting, and fishing. The cover bears the names of the five men, plus two late joiners with more trip information on the inside cover. The back cover bears the maker’s mark of Verne E. Joy.

Collection

Ball and McKee Records, 1835, 1908, and undated

3 cubic feet (in 3 boxes)

Law firm records include legal records of estates, divorces, chancery cases, and debt collection, correspondence, and numerous land records. McKee family records are also included.

The collection includes many types of legal records, including: Estates, Divorces, Chancery Cases, and debt collection papers. Correspondence is from clients, lawyers, legal firms, banks, and various land offices. Some of the larger case files include those of the Bank of Lansingburgh (New York) and the Indian Mill Creek Salt Company (Grand Rapids, Mich.). Numerous land records include: State Tax Deeds, Indentures, Mortgages, Bounty Lands for Veterans and their widows, Deeds, Plat Maps, and Receipts for land. The firm had many clients in Michigan and New York (State).

McKee family records include family correspondence, 1840s-1874, undated; legal cases, and Aaron McKee’s (father of James McKee) inheritance case, 1856-1864. Also included is the 1862 license for Ball and McKee and a letter of protest over the removal of the soldiers’ memorial in Grand Rapids, 1908.

Processing Note: Personal materials of John Ball were apparently removed when this collection first came to the Clarke and became the John Ball Family Papers.

Collection

Bandfield family photograph album, ca. 1870

1 volume

Thomas J. Bandfield, a native of England, compiled carte-de-visite photographs of friends and family members in this album before moving to the United States in 1870.

The inscription on page one indicates that Jane Rugg Bandfield of Chard, England, gave this photograph album to her son, Thomas John Bandfield, in London, England, in April 1870, before his departure for the United States. The volume (16cm x 14cm) contains 42 carte-de-visite portraits of Bandfield family members and acquaintances, both men and women. A later photographic print with a picture of an unidentified man, possibly Thomas J. Bandfield, is laid into the volume, as is an envelope addressed to Edna Bandfield of Portland, Michigan, Thomas Bandfield's daughter. The envelope has captions for most of the album's cartes-de-visite. A few individuals posed with children. One carte-de-visite has a photograph of a painted silhouette, and another shows "Four old Englishmen," otherwise unidentified. The subjects were photographed in studios in England. Some subjects may appear more than once.

Collection

Barbary Aplin, Cyphering Book, 1803

1 volume

Barbary Aplin's Cyphering Book contains examples and explanations of arithmetic operations, and genealogical information about the Applin, Sparks, and Coxe families of New Jersey.

The Barbary Aplin Cyphering Book contains examples and explanations of arithmetic operations, and genealogical information about the Applin, Sparks, and Coxe families of New Jersey. The first 10 pages of the book are arithmetic rules, proofs, problems and solutions, and tables. Although the manuscript inscription on the cover is "Barbary Aplin's Cyphering Book," Elizabeth Sparks signed her name on page five, suggesting that she may have contributed to the volume.

Eight additional pages contain sparse genealogical notes regarding the Applin, Sparks, and Coxe families of New Jersey, including birth and death dates for several members of the families. Also of interest is a brief note regarding the deaths of Mary and Hanna Sparks in 1824, accompanied by a small swatch of cloth.

The fourth page of the volume includes a young person's drawings of plants, a person, buildings, a fence, and a bird.

Collection

Barbourville (Ky.) Debating Society minutes, 1837-1839, 1922, 1954

3 volumes

The Barbourville (Ky.) Debating Society minutes concern the group's weekly meetings in the late 1830s. Each set of minutes contains attendees' names, the number of affirmative and negative votes regarding that week's question, and the next week's discussion topic. Members discussed subjects related to national and state politics, finances, penal codes, gender, and morality.

The Barbourville (Ky.) Debating Society minutes (122 pages) concern the group's weekly meetings between May 27, 1837, and November 16, 1839, with breaks between November 18, 1837-March 10, 1838, and August 4, 1838-March 30, 1839. The first entry and those that immediately follow the breaks contain the society's 3 constitutions. In addition to meeting minutes, the volume includes a 2-page membership list.

Most sets of weekly minutes list the names of attending members, the names of members selected to debate that meeting's assigned topic, the results of the society's vote, and the topic to be discussed at the following meeting. The minutes also reflect administrative matters settled during meetings, frequently regarding the admittance of new members and the election of officers. The Barbourville Debating Society mainly discussed political matters; some topics were debated on multiple occasions. Issues for debate included banking and taxation, the death penalty, revision of the Kentucky constitution, the admission of Texas to the Union, the relative worth of wealth and talent, the intellectual capacity of men and women, foreign immigration to the United States, the propriety of sanctioning divorces, and the desired amount of government funding for education and infrastructure. On at least two occasions, the society considered whether Native American removal or slavery was the greater evil, and on one occasion they considered whether the United States government could be justified in its actions against the Seminole tribe (July 13, 1839). The society also debated the legacies of politicians such as Andrew Jackson and Napoleon Bonaparte, and discussed the possibility of Henry Clay running for president in 1840.

The Barbourville (Ky.) Debating Society minutes arrived at the Clements Library with two published volumes:
Collection

Bartolomé de las Casas Tyrannies et Cruautez des Espagnols Perpetrees es Indes Occidentales..., 1582

One volume

This volume is an early French translation of Bartolomé de Las Casas influential treatise Brevissima Relacion de la Destruccion de las India, an indictment of the Spanish conquerors for acts of brutality inflicted on the indigenous peoples of the New World.

In 1539, Bartolomé de las Casas wrote Breuissima relacion de la destruycion de las Indias..., a short treatise that indicted the Spanish conquerors for acts of brutality inflicted on the American Indians in the New World. The first of nine tracts on this subject, Brevissima was first published in 1552 and later published in France in 1579 as Tyrannies et Cruautez des Espagnols Perpetres es Indes Occidentales Quon dit le Nouveau Monde: Brievement Descrites en Lettre Castillane par L'Evesque Don Frere Bartelemy De Las Casas...fidelement traduites par Jackques De Miggrode: à Paris par Guillaume Julien.... Clements manuscript was likely prepared in 1582 for an illustrated Paris edition which was never printed; the 17 watercolor illustrations, depicting gruesome acts of torture, are similar to the engravings used by DeBry for his 1598 Latin edition.

Las Casas wrote two chronicles, Historia General de las Indias and Historia Apologetica de las Indias, which were designed to form a single work. He asked his executors not to publish them until forty years after his death. They were not printed, in fact, until 1875-1876 at Madrid, when they appeared under the title "Historia de las Yndias." The original manuscripts are in the Biblioteca de la Academia de la Historia, Madrid. The Clements copy corresponds to the prologue and first 11 chapters of the printed Historia General.

Collection

Basil G. Austin Papers, 1904, 1953, and Undated

.5 cubic foot (in 1 box)

Papers include consists of copies of Basil’s notes on his family, diaries from 1904, a bound version of Diary of a ninety-eighter, and the cover page and maps of Cumming’s book.

There are three versions of Basil’s diary. The first version is the handwritten original, which he kept in Alaska, along with a more legible 1904 version. The second version is a typescript that closely follows the original, probably written after 1910. The third version was published by John Cumming as Diary of a ninety-eighter. (Copies of this book are separately cataloged in the CMU libraries.)

The diary described Basil’s trip, mining experiences, companions, Nels Seaver and Ed Burmeister, and Alaska in detail.

The collection consists of copies of Basil’s notes on his family, diaries from 1904, a bound version of Diary of a ninety-eighter, and the cover page and maps of Cumming’s book.

Collection

Beatrice and William Ebeling letters, 1942, 1944-1946

32 items

The Beatrice and William Ebeling letters concern the couple's life in China in the early to mid-1940s. They wrote to William's parents in Kalamazoo, Michigan, about their work for the China Inland Mission, the growth of their children, and current events.

The Beatrice and William Ebeling letters (32 items) concern the couple's life in China in the early to mid-1940s. Both Beatrice and William composed manuscript and typewritten letters to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Carl Ebeling of Kalamazoo, Michigan. Their first 2 letters pertain to the birth of their son, John Carl Ebeling, and their life in Wuyang Xi'an, Henan, in December 1942; the remaining items relate to their experiences after fleeing to "Pinshien" [Binxian?], Shaanxi, in the summer of 1944 and while living in Hancheng, Shaanxi, from around October 1944 to March 1946. They commented on their missionary work, finances, the progress and end of the Pacific war, the growth of their children, and their travels within China. William's letter of June 8, 1944, recounts a bombing raid. A birth announcement for John Carl Ebeling, with a colored drawing of a baby's head, is enclosed in the Ebelings' letter of December 7, 1942. The collection includes a short, undated note to Ebeling's grandfather.

Collection

Beauties of The Sea photograph album, [ca. 1895]

1 volume

The Beauties of The Sea photograph album contains five small commercial photographs of scenes on Nantucket along with four alternating sheets of decoratively arranged pressed algae.

The Beauties of The Sea photograph album (12 x 14 cm ) contains five small commercial photographs of scenes on Nantucket (The Old Windmill; Brant Point Light; Harbor and Sailboats; the Town Crier; and Bank and Methodist Church) glued into small album along with four alternating sheets of decoratively arranged pressed algae. The photographs are possibly by Henry S. Wyer. The album's faded green paper covers are tied with gold tasseled string with a wash drawing and inscribed title "Beauties of The Sea" in ink. Album is housed in light green folder.

Collection

Beauty and the Beast manuscript play prompt, [1854]

1 volume

This volume contains a manuscript play prompt for the fairytale "Beauty and the Beast," drawn directly from Julia Corner's 1854 adaptation of the same tale.

This volume contains a manuscript play prompt for the fairytale "Beauty and the Beast," drawn directly from Julia Corner's 1854 adaptation of the same tale.

The text largely corresponds with Corner's adaptation, albeit with abbreviated or simplified stage directions. The text appears to have been written by one hand, with a pencil annotation at the end of the volume in a second hand, crediting the performance of this play to "some of the girls that go to Miss Lacy's School."

Although the location of Miss Lacy's School is unclear, the spelling within may indicate contemporary American rather than British expectations. The roles are for a merchant, the Beast, the merchant's daughters, Beauty, and a beneficent fairy with four attendants.

Collection

Beauty and the Beast manuscript play prompt, [1854]

1 volume

This volume contains a manuscript play prompt for the fairytale "Beauty and the Beast," drawn directly from Julia Corner's 1854 adaptation of the same tale.

This volume contains a manuscript play prompt for the fairytale "Beauty and the Beast," drawn directly from Julia Corner's 1854 adaptation of the same tale.

The text largely corresponds with Corner's adaptation, albeit with abbreviated or simplified stage directions. The text appears to have been written by one hand, with a pencil annotation at the end of the volume in a second hand, crediting the performance of this play to "some of the girls that go to Miss Lacy's School."

Although the location of Miss Lacy's School is unclear, the spelling within may indicate contemporary American rather than British expectations. The roles are for a merchant, the Beast, the merchant's daughters, Beauty, and a beneficent fairy with four attendants.

Collection

Belle Danforth student map composition book, 1891

1 volume

Belle D. Danforth compiled geography exercises in this composition notebook during 1891, when she was approximately thirteen years old. The volume principally focuses on the United States but also includes entries relating to Africa, Asia, and North America. Belle Danforth's exercises provide information on a standard list of topics, including details on the location, the "race of man" to be found in the area, native animals, vegetable life, resources, industries, productions, cities, countries and capitals, and government. However, Danforth did not always include answers for each in her entries, in particular only noting racial groups when writing about larger regions. She also included a hand-drawn map of the area with descriptive text relating to boundaries, bays and gulfs, capes, mountains, rivers, lakes, and cities.

Belle D. Danforth compiled geography exercises in this composition notebook during 1891, when she was approximately thirteen years old. The volume principally focuses on the United States but also includes entries relating to Africa, Asia, and North America. Belle Danforth's exercises provide information on a standard list of topics, including details on the location, the "race of man" to be found in the area, native animals, vegetable life, resources, industries, productions, cities, countries and capitals, and government. However, Danforth did not always include answers for each in her entries, in particular only noting racial groups when writing about larger regions. She also included a hand-drawn map of the area with descriptive text relating to boundaries, bays and gulfs, capes, mountains, rivers, lakes, and cities. Danforth's notes reflect how students were learning about regions' notable features and populations.

Maps drawn in the volume include:
  • Western and Eastern Hemispheres
  • North America
  • Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine
  • New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey
  • Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Indian Territory (now Oklahoma)
  • Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin
  • Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas
  • Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and California
  • Michigan
  • Asia (encompassing present-day West Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia)
  • Africa

A map of West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky appears to be missing, but textual information about the region is provided. Only a partial entry is present for Europe.

Collection

Benneville Hiester journal, 1853

1 volume

This journal recounts the experiences of Benneville Hiester, a native of Berks County, Pennsylvania, who traveled from Pleasant Township, Ohio, to St. Louis, Missouri, and back to Pennsylvania in the spring of 1853. Hiester recorded the odd jobs he did for local farmers around Pleasant Township and Lancaster, Ohio; his trip westward through Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois by railroad and overland roads; his return journey to Pennsylvania, taken primarily by steamboat; and the labor he did for nearby farmers after his return.

The Benneville Hiester diary contains about 50 pages of short daily entries about his travels from Pleasant Township, Ohio, to St. Louis, Missouri, and back to Pennsylvania in 1853.

In January 1853, Hiester lived in Pleasant Township, Ohio, where he chopped wood and performed other tasks for local farmers. In his journal, he mentioned the names of those for whom he worked, as well as his work at a nearby poorhouse and his labor digging graves and building pig sties. On February 19, he visited Joseph Hiester and his son Daniel in Boylston, Ohio, and on March 7, he left Lancaster for Columbus, Ohio, where he boarded a train for Cincinnati with a companion named Jacob. Hiester noted the cost of his ticket and provided brief descriptions of his journey across Ohio and Indiana, including a stop at Vandala, Indiana, to visit acquaintances. On March 20, he and Jacob traveled on the "National Road" to Illinois, and they arrived in St. Louis, Missouri, on the 22nd. Hiester set out for Pennsylvania on the same day, paying $10.50 for a steamboat ticket on the Elephant, which traveled along Ohio River to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which Hiester reached on April 4. From there, he went to Harrisburg and then to his home near Bern, which he reached by foot on April 6. The final entries, which Hiester wrote regularly until May 1 and again from June 14 to June 22, concern the daily weather and his manual labor. The entry for June 21 mentions his work with tobacco.

Collection

Bessie B. Beach notebook, ca. 1898

1 volume

This notebook contains lecture notes on a variety of topics in library science as studied by Bessie Baldwin Beach, who spent most of her career as a librarian for the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Carlisle and Chilocco Indian Schools in the 1900s and 1910s.

This single volume notebook contains lecture notes on a variety of topics in library science as studied by Bessie Baldwin Beach, who spent most of her career as a librarian for the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Carlisle and Chilocco Indian Schools in the 1900s and 1910s.

From the address on the cover and the contents within, the notebook dates to Miss Beach's time as a library science student at the Columbian University (Washington, D.C.) from 1897 to 1899. The only three dates denoted are March 23, March 30, and April 8, 1898. Newly founded in October 1897, the library science program (housed in the Corcoran Scientific School) consisted of a four-year curriculum towards a Bachelor's of Science in the discipline. Headed by Ainsworth Rand Spofford, who had just completed his tenure as Librarian of Congress, the department consisted of two other instructors: William P. Cutter and Henderson Presnell. Courses covered a range of library skills including administration, cataloging, reference, as well as a thesis.

Works referenced within the notebook appear to include the following:

  • Various definitions and entry on "Accession book:" Dewey, Melvil. Simplified Library School Rules. Boston: Library Bureau, 1898.
  • Definition of "Accession book:" Jones, Gardner Maynard. "Accession Department." In Papers Prepared for the World's Library Congress, Held at the Columbian Exposition, ed. Melvil Dewey. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1896, 809-826.
  • Entry on "Classification:" Sixteenth Annual Report of the Board of Directors of the St. Louis Public Schools for the Year Ending August 1, 1870. St. Louis: Plate, Olshausen, and Co., 1871.
  • Entry on "Charging System:" Plummer, Mary Wright. "Loan Systems." In Papers Prepared for the World's Library Congress, Held at the Columbian Exposition, ed. Melvil Dewey. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1896, 898-906.
  • Entry on "Card catalog:" Dewey, Melvil, ed. Library Notes: Improved Methods and Labor-Savers for Librarians, Readers, and Writers. Boston: Library Bureau, 1886.
  • Entries on "Periodical Literature," "Book buying," "Helps to reading," "Character and Requirements of librarian," "Preparation of books for the shelves," "Accuracy," "Order and System," "Liberal and impartial mind," "Books," "Old book stores," "Pamphlets," and "Library History" : Spofford, Ainsworth Rand. A Book for All Readers: Designed as an Aid to the Collection, Use, and Preservation of Books and the Formation of Public and Private Libraries. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1900.

Collection

Bicentennial and Michigan Week collection, 1963, 1989

3 cubic feet (in 3 boxes, 2 Oversized folders)

The collection includes publications, meeting minutes, and photographs related to the American bicentennial.

The collection consists largely of publications regarding the American Revolution bicentennial, the celebration of the bicentennial in Michigan, and Michigan Week before and during the bicentennial, 1963-1968 and 1971-1989. Materials include magazine and newspaper articles (copies), newsletters, reports, a few photographs and meeting minutes, and other materials from federal, Michigan, and local bicentennial councils and commissions. A large, although incomplete, run of the Bicentennial Times [Wash.: American Revolution Bicentennial Administration], 1974-1976 (Scattered) is also included, as are a number of special or collectors’ editions of bicentennial newspapers, fliers, bulletins, a calendar, and an issue of Superman Salutes the Bicentennial, 1976. Most of the materials were mailed to John Cumming, who later donated them to the Clarke.

Processing Note: Numerous, miscellaneous generic advertising fliers were withdrawn from the collection during processing because they were of minimal importance in documenting the bicentennial.

Collection

Biddeford High School (Biddeford, Me.) student compositions, 1850-1851, 1859

1 volume

This volume contains 21 compositions by 12 students (eight girls and four boys) of Biddeford High School, Maine, between 1850 and 1851 (approx. 90 pages). These "prize compositions" pertain to subjects such as nature, morality, happiness, music, comparisons between the country as it was versus how it is now, industry, and intemperance.

This volume contains 21 compositions by 12 students (eight girls and four boys) of Biddeford High School, Maine, between 1850 and 1851 (approx. 90 pages). These "prize compositions" pertain to subjects such as nature, morality, happiness, music, comparisons between the country as it was versus how it is now, industry, and intemperance.

The volume concludes with a one-page letter of thanks from Biddeford High School principal Horace Piper to his students, September 10, 1859, thanking them for the gift of a chair; and a two-page letter from the "Ladies [of] Biddeford" to the Triumph Engine Company (fire brigade), presenting them with an American flag.

Flyleaf: "Prize Compositions Biddeford High School, Fall Term, 1850"
  • Page 1: "Botanical Chart"
  • Pages 3-6: Elizabeth L. P. Adams, "Reading"
  • Pages 7-9: Maria C. Grey, "Advantages of Industry"
  • Pages 11-13: Hannah A. Burnham, "Saco Falls"
  • Pages 15-18: Henri B. Haskell, "Beauties of Nature in Oxford County"
  • Pages 19-24: Elizabeth L. P. Adams, "The Beauties of Nature"
  • Pages 25-27: Robert Russell, "Beauties of Nature"
  • Pages 29-32: Maria C. Grey, "The Beauties of Nature"
  • Pages 33-36: Luther T. Mason, "The Art of Writing"
  • Pages 39-41: Charles Nichols, "Children should obey their Parents"
Page 43: "Prize Compositions of Biddeford High School, Winter Term, 1850 and 1851"
  • Pages 44-47: Maria C. Grey, "Happiness"
  • Pages 48-51: Sarah M. Kendell, "A bad Sholar [sic.]"
  • Pages 51-52: Unsigned, "Intemperance"
  • Pages 56-59: John B. Lowell, "This Country as it was and as it is"
  • Pages 60-64: Luther T. Mason, "This Country as it was, and as it is"
  • Pages 65-67: Hannah A. Burnham, "Happiness"
  • Pages 68-69: Ellen Smith, "Doing Good to Others"
  • Pages 70-74: E. L. P. Adams, "Happiness"
Page 75: "Prize Compositions Biddeford High School, Spring Term, 1851"
  • Pages 76-77: Maria C. Morton, "On The improvement of Time"
  • Pages 78-80: Maria C. Morton, "To a Flower" (poem)
  • Pages 81-84: Julia A. Lord, "Music"
  • Pages 84-89: Maria C. Grey, "Flowers"
Concluding pages of the volume:
  • Horace Piper, "A Card To my Former Pupils who honored me with a present on the ninth instant", Biddeford, September 10, 1859 (1 page)
  • Ladies [of] Biddeford, to "Gentlemen of the Triumph Engine Company" (2 pages)

Collection

Blanche LeStrange Family Papers, 1884, 1985, and undated

.5 cubic feet (in 1 box)

The papers include biographical materials, miscellaneous, photographs, postcards, and an autograph album.

The collection includes biographical materials, miscellaneous, photographs, postcards, and an autograph album. An inventory is available to assist researchers.

Collection

Blass Family Papers, 1922, 2002

7.5 cubic feet (in 8 boxes)

Collection includes love letters, postcards, notes, and telegrams sent between Kenneth Blass and his future wife Marie F. Kleiner, 1922-1927. Kenneth's letters document his membership in and activities with the Ku Klux Klan.

The collection consists of love letters, postcards, notes, and telegrams sent between Kenneth and Marie during their four year courtship, 1922-1927. Materials are organized chronologically, with a typed transcript of the correspondence on the front and the original materials (often a letter and envelope) on the back of a polyester page. The pages are organized chronologically into binders. One folder of press releases about the collection is included in the front of Box #1.

The letters provide a view of courtship, life, one-room schoolhouses, teaching, the daily struggles of a working man, and love in the 1920s. Kenneth was a member of the Ku Klux Klan. His letters notes his attitudes about and various social activities of the Ku Klux Klan in Michigan in the 1920s. He wanted to be married in a Ku Klux Klan ceremony, but Marie declined this idea.

Collection

Blount-Bulen letters, 1844, 1855

3 items

This collection consists of three letters sent from members of the Blount and Bulen families from Minnesota in 1844 and 1855 back to relatives in Mexico, New York. They describe the family's migration from New York to Phelps, Minnesota, their efforts to establish farms in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and descriptions of the country. The letters include phonetic spellings, and two of the letters were written jointly by several members of the family.

This collection consists of three letters sent from members of the Blount and Bulen families from Minnesota in 1844 and 1855 back to relatives in Mexico, New York. They describe the family's migration from New York to Phelps, Minnesota, their efforts to establish farms in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and descriptions of the country. The letters include phonetic spellings, and two of the letters were written jointly by several members of the family. For additional information, see the individual descriptions in the Contents List.

Collection

Boston (Mass.) photographs, ca. 1905

1 volume

This collection consists of photographs of Boston, Massachusetts, and other New England towns, taken around the turn of the 20th century. The collection includes pictures of commercial and municipal buildings, battleships, and city landmarks.

This collection consists of photographs of Boston, Massachusetts, and other New England towns, taken around the turn of the 20th century. The collection includes pictures of commercial and municipal buildings, battleships, and city landmarks.

Large format photographs show a variety of Boston scenes, including commercial streets and buildings, harbor views, waterfront parks, the USS Hartford and USS New York, a streetcar station and tracks, a horse-drawn firefighting ladder truck, and a crowd waching the launch of an unrigged yacht in Boston Harbor. Buildings depicted include Faneuil Hall, the Jordan Marsh department store, and the U.S. Customhouse. A scene on the Boston Common shows the statue of George Washington being decorated, with a crowd of pedestrians including a Civil War veteran wearing a uniform with medals. Also included is a photograph of the Witch House in Salem, Mass., former residence of Joseph Corwin, a judge at the Salem witch trials; and a collision of two locomotives with a photographer on the scene, possibly staged. The first image (10cm x 14.5cm), an overhead view of Charlestown and the Bunker Hill Monument, is affixed to a wall calendar for the year 1884; all of its removable monthly pages are still intact. The calendar was presented with "Compliments of Annie T. Smith."

Collection

Boston to St. Louis travel diary, 1837

1 volume

The Boston to St. Louis travel diary recounts an arduous month-long journey between the two cities made by rail, steamboat, and stagecoach in the fall of 1837.

The Boston to St. Louis travel diary recounts an arduous month-long journey between the two cities made by rail, steamboat, and stagecoach in the fall of 1837. The anonymous author, a staunchly religious man, refused to travel on Sundays and attended Sunday religious services at Presbyterian churches throughout his travels, which took him through northern New York, down the Erie Canal, across lower Michigan and northern Illinois, and finally down the Mississippi River to St. Louis. The diarist wrote daily entries about frequent delays, bad weather, his route, the scenery, and various traveling companions, many of whom he knew. Though the initial leg from Boston to Rochester, New York, proceeded without difficulty, he became stranded in Cleveland and was frequently held back by poor, muddy roads as he proceeded by stagecoach from Detroit to Chicago. He finally reached St. Louis on November 28 and concluded the journal on November 30, a lonely and homesick Thanksgiving. Though the author's daily entries fully chronicle the hardships of travel in the early 19th century, they also provide interesting anecdotes and commentary, including encounters with wild animals along the road, and news of the murder of abolitionist minister Elijah Parish Lovejoy, which the diarist first heard about in Chicago, but also later in Alton, Illinois, where the murder made "abolitionism…more than ever the topic of conversation" (November 25). The final two pages of the volume consist of a table of distances, fares, and expenses incurred throughout the trip.

Collection

Bouquet's Expedition against the Indians, 1764

2 volumes

Bouquet's Expedition against the Indians consists of two orderly books issued by Colonel Henry Bouquet, spanning August-November 1764, during which time he lead a small army into western Ohio Indian territory to retrieve white captives and to enforce a peace settlement with the Delaware, Mingo, Shawnee, and Wyandot Indians. These volumes contain detailed information on Bouquet's decisions and actions, and explain how he maneuvered his forces through the wilderness.

Bouquet's Expedition against the Indians consists of two headquarters books (262 pages) of orders issued by Colonel Henry Bouquet, spanning August-November, 1764, during which time he lead a small army, made up of Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland troops, into western Ohio Indian territory to retrieve all white captives in the region and to enforce a peace settlement with the Delaware, Mingo, Shawnee, and Wyandot Indians. The orderly books are entitled "Orders and Dispositions for the Troops Serving in the Southern Department on an Expedition against the Savages, in 1764," and are the first two of a three volume set (the whereabouts of the third volume is unknown, but Bouquet's mission ended only nine days after the second journal ends). The two volumes are written in several different hands.

The entries contain typical orders, such as promotions, disciplinary actions, travel progress, food ration amounts, and the daily parole and countersign, but the books are notable for their detailed descriptions of Bouquet's military strategies for leading a small army into an unfamiliar wilderness, and for their thorough documentation of army life. Orders contain lengthy discussions of troop formations and are accompanied by diagrams of camp layouts, and marching and attack formations. (For a complete list of diagrams, see the Related Collections section below where each sketch has been individually catalogued). Bouquet gives specific instructions for how the camp is to be maintained. For example, on August 18 he orders: "At least Ten yards in Front and rear of the different faces of the Encampment to be cleared & swept Clean Immediately. All the men off Duty to be employed at this Work and the Quarter Master of the Day will see that is properly performed." Each operation is given in a similar if not better level of attention. Bouquet often even specifies the precise distance that should separate troops while marching. No detail, it seems, is too small to escape Bouquet's attention.

Bouquet's orders contain the names of his officers and many of the soldiers marching with him. Throughout the journal he notes the numbers, ranks, and occupations of his forces, as well as those stationed in forts along the way. Positions include regulars, light infantry, reserve, flankers, advanced rifle men, doctors, surgeons, cattle drivers, coopers, horse men, axe men, and hunters. The troops expended much effort clearing paths through the thick forests, but their hatchets served an important second purpose. On September 8, Bouquet recommended that the officers "be particularly carefull that their Men do not negligently lose or abuse their Hatchets as they are the only weapons they can depend on in Attacking the Enemy after they have discharged their Fire Arms."

The orderly books document women traveling with the troops, though Bouquet did not approve of their presence. On August 13 and 15, Bouquet ordered a prohibition on women travelling with the army. By September 23, however, Bouquet ordered that "One Woman belonging to Each Corps & two Nurses for the Genl Hospital will be pitched upon by the Commanding Offic[ers] of Corps to proceed wt ye Army...All the Women now in Camp and Those unnecessary in Garrison are to be sent down the Country." Bouquet repeated this order on September 27 and threatened that any women following the army would "be punished in the Severest Manner and sent back unprotected from the Enemy and unprovided wt Food." Nurses were mentioned again on November 1, in an order for them to attend the sick and the young children among the captives.

The second volume opens with a general order from Bouquet stating "that every thing is now ready to act offensively against the enemy Indians in order to obtain satisfaction for the Murders and depredations they have committed against his Majestys Subjects, without the least provocation, cause, or pretence...The Savages now will find to their Terror...men [filled] with resentment at at so many Injuries received and not yet revenged" (October 2, 1764). Though similar proclamations of revenge are scattered throughout the books, the mission turned out to be largely peaceful with few violent encounters with the enemy. In fact, after a soldier was murdered by some Indians on November 7, Bouquet first requested that the chiefs offer up the murderer for justice, and also "Expressly forbid that any person in the Army shou'd Offer Violence, to any of the Indians on that account." Bouquet sought to control all British interactions with the Indians. He forbade any trading, especially horse trading, between soldiers and Indians, and commanded that "Any person Detected for the future, in the Actual possession of a horse, not his own whether he be a White man, or Indian will be Immediately Hang'd" (November 8). The punishment for embezzlement or theft was equally severe (October 8).

Of particular interest is the description of the expedition's treatment of the returned white captives. On October 29, for instance, Bouquet ordered that "Upon the delivery of the Prisoners they are to be separated and sent to the Apartments alloted for each Sex. Exact and distinct Lists of their Names to be Immediately taken, specifying their Age, Sex, where and when taken &c And particular description of the Features, Complexion, Size...there will be many among them who are very much attached to the Savages by having lived wt them from their Infancy, These if not narrowly watched may be apt to make their Escape after they are delivered up." These descriptions were taken so that family would be able to claim their lost relatives. Also of interest are references to military leaders such as General Thomas Gage, General John Forbes, and Sir William Johnson.

Bouquet's forces marched through the following locations in Pennsylvania and Ohio, as noted in the orderly books:

Volume 1, August 5-October 1, 1764 (167 pages): Carlisle, Fort Loudoun, Fort Littleton, Fort Bedford, Camp at Edmonds Swamp, Quemahoning Bridge, Fort Ligonier, a camp at Nine Mile Run, and Fort Pitt.

Volume 2, October 2 to November 9, 1764 (95 pages): Mont Gage, a number of encampments on the banks of the Ohio River labeled by mileage markers from Fort Pitt, camp at Tuscarawas, camps on the Muskingum River, and camps near the Wakatomika Creek.

The back of the first volume contains 7 pages of earlier general orders, starting on November [18], 1763, with a blank order followed by lengthier entries for scattered dates between January 7, 1764 and June 14, 1764:

  • January 7: General orders commendation from His Majesty for the Battle of Bushy Run.
  • January 15: Notice of a general court marshal hearing in Albany.
  • January 16: Discharge and payment of the members of the 1st Battalion Royal American Regiment.
  • January 23: Information for the discharge of the men of the 77 and 42 Regiments.
  • February 22: Orders for transporting the 3rd Battalion.
  • March 30: Future instructions for accounting for leaves of absence.
  • April 1: Announcement of Colonel Bradstreet's appointment.
  • April 4: Rough estimates of numbers of officers in the Royal American Regiment.
  • June 14: recruiting notice.

See Related Collections for information on the published versions of the journals.

Collection

Brayton W. Smith diary, 1867

1 volume

The Brayton W. Smith diary includes daily entries detailing Smith's experiences as a student at Beloit Academy in Beloit, Wisconsin, and at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 1867. His entries describe curricula, student life, studying habits, boarding houses, family matters, and his interest in baseball.

While attending Beloit Academy to prepare for college, Smith wrote of his coursework, progress in studying, struggles with exams, weather, and his relationships with other students, roommates, and boarding house proprietors. Smith also documented his activities with local religious groups, debating societies, and baseball clubs.

During vacations, Smith returned to his family who lived near Janesville, Wisconsin. He described his leisure activities, including picking berries and hunting, his struggles to continue studying, and his active involvement in local baseball, both in organized clubs and informal games among friends. Throughout the summer, Smith frequently documented information about area baseball clubs, practices, games, and tournaments.

In mid-September, Smith matriculated at the University of Michigan, and his diary includes a record of his experiences with entrance exams, tutoring, coursework, and his observations of student activities and elections. He also commented on the "University nine" baseball players, noting several of their games, and the creation of a baseball club for the freshman class.

Collection

Brown-Danskin Company photograph album, ca. 1920

1 volume

The Brown-Danskin Company photograph album contains photographs of farm properties in the Red River Valley (North Dakota and Minnesota), offered for sale by the Brown-Danskin Company.

The Brown-Danskin Company photograph album (15 x 20 cm) contains 50 photoprints of farm properties in the Red River Valley (North Dakota and Minnesota), offered for sale by the Brown-Danskin Company. Photographs show large fields of clover, rye and wheat, often with a lone figure standing at a distance. Also shown are farmhouses, barns, and outbuildings on properties, with occasional livestock. Cars, telephone lines, and windmills appear in multiple photographs, and several images relate to harvests. Typescript captions describe the buildings, available amenities, soils, and prices. Images appear to be professionally composed and developed.

The album has a black cloth cover with printed title: Eastern North Dakota and Red River Valley Farms, the Brown-Danskin Company, Minneapolis, Minn. and is housed in a pale blue cardboard box.

Collection

Buffalo (N.Y.) Police Reports, 1887

1 volume

The Buffalo (N.Y.) Police Reports contain brief statements regarding criminal activity, missing persons and animals, and other police department affairs throughout the first half of 1887. Many reports include descriptions of suspects and stolen goods.

The Buffalo (N.Y.) Police Reports (1 volume, 410 pages) pertain to criminal activity, missing or escaped persons, and police department affairs in Buffalo, New York, from January 10, 1887-June 29, 1887.

Each entry contains a brief description of a complaint, usually with information about the location and nature of the crime, the name of the complainant, and a description of the suspect(s). Most reports concern missing persons, missing animals, and stolen items. The missing persons reports often list common haunts, possible travel plans, place of origin if not Buffalo, and distinguishing characteristics. On January 18, two young women were to be sought among the city's brothels; on April 4, a woman was wanted for abandoning her husband and children. A few persons had escaped from prisons or asylums, and others were runaways. Some records pertain to crimes such as begging, peddling, and counterfeiting, and to the police department's administrative affairs.

The volume also records suspects accused of crimes including rape and assault; on February 5, for example, Hiram Aaronson was sought and arrested for the rape of a seven-year-old girl. Some entries contain additional notes about resolutions, often through the arrest of perpetrators and the repossession of stolen goods.

Collection

Bunker Hill Monument souvenir photograph album, 1884

1 volume

This photograph album contains 10 albumen prints related to the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

This souvenir photograph album (12cm x 18cm), which contains 10 albumen prints, is bound in blue pebbled book-cloth and has the title "Album Photographs[,] Bunker Hill Monument" stamped in gold on its cover. The first 2 pictures show the Bunker Hill Monument (a stone obelisk) and the statue of Colonel William Prescott, respectively. The remaining 8 photographs are aerial views of Charlestown and the surrounding area taken from the monument, showing residences, industrial buildings, the Charlestown Navy Yard, and the Charles and Mystic Rivers. Sailing ships are visible in many of the aerial views. The album belonged to Lucia K. Hathaway, who inscribed her name on its first page on November 15, 1884.

Collection

Burlingham family letters, 1863

2 items

This collection is comprised of two letters (six pages) to Horace Burlingham, who had fled to Canada as a deserter from the 9th New York Infantry Regiment (Hawkins Zouaves) during the American Civil War. His father Waterman, mother Amanda, and sister Mary Burlingham wrote joint letters to Horace in 1863, from their farm at Edmeston, New York. Waterman filled five pages of the letters, expressing relief that his son made it over the border, updating him on the status of other deserters from the area, sharing his knowledge of Provost Marshall Cole's area of jurisdiction and methods, and offering related advisement. Waterman discussed Horace's wife Loverna and their daughter Theressa, who remained in Edmeston. He criticized Loverna's penchant for "new notions, and Castle Building" and her poor household management, and he recommended that she not join Horace in Canada. He also thought this was a good opportunity to teach Horace how to write letters (specifically capitalization) and provided details about laborers, agricultural product prices, and farm machinery. Horace's sister updated him on friends and family relationships, including the features of a newborn or infant baby. His mother added a note to let Horace know that she never forgets him.

This collection is comprised of two letters (six pages) to Horace Burlingham, who had fled to Canada as a deserter from the 9th New York Infantry Regiment (Hawkins Zouaves) during the American Civil War. His father Waterman, mother Amanda, and sister Mary Burlingham wrote joint letters to Horace in 1863, from their farm at Edmeston, New York. Waterman filled five pages of the letters, expressing relief that his son made it over the border, updating him on the status of other deserters from the area, sharing his knowledge of Provost Marshall Cole's area of jurisdiction and methods, and offering related advisement. Waterman discussed Horace's wife Loverna and their daughter Theressa, who remained in Edmeston. He criticized Loverna's penchant for "new notions, and Castle Building" and her poor household management, and he recommended that she not join Horace in Canada. He also thought this was a good opportunity to teach Horace how to write letters (specifically capitalization) and provided details about laborers, agricultural product prices, and farm machinery. Horace's sister updated him on friends and family relationships, including the features of a newborn or infant baby. His mother added a note to let Horace know that she never forgets him.

Please see the box and folder listing below for detailed information about each letter in the collection.

Collection

Burlingham family letters, 1863

2 items

This collection is comprised of two letters (six pages) to Horace Burlingham, who had fled to Canada as a deserter from the 9th New York Infantry Regiment (Hawkins Zouaves) during the American Civil War. His father Waterman, mother Amanda, and sister Mary Burlingham wrote joint letters to Horace in 1863, from their farm at Edmeston, New York. Waterman filled five pages of the letters, expressing relief that his son made it over the border, updating him on the status of other deserters from the area, sharing his knowledge of Provost Marshall Cole's area of jurisdiction and methods, and offering related advisement. Waterman discussed Horace's wife Loverna and their daughter Theressa, who remained in Edmeston. He criticized Loverna's penchant for "new notions, and Castle Building" and her poor household management, and he recommended that she not join Horace in Canada. He also thought this was a good opportunity to teach Horace how to write letters (specifically capitalization) and provided details about laborers, agricultural product prices, and farm machinery. Horace's sister updated him on friends and family relationships, including the features of a newborn or infant baby. His mother added a note to let Horace know that she never forgets him.

This collection is comprised of two letters (six pages) to Horace Burlingham, who had fled to Canada as a deserter from the 9th New York Infantry Regiment (Hawkins Zouaves) during the American Civil War. His father Waterman, mother Amanda, and sister Mary Burlingham wrote joint letters to Horace in 1863, from their farm at Edmeston, New York. Waterman filled five pages of the letters, expressing relief that his son made it over the border, updating him on the status of other deserters from the area, sharing his knowledge of Provost Marshall Cole's area of jurisdiction and methods, and offering related advisement. Waterman discussed Horace's wife Loverna and their daughter Theressa, who remained in Edmeston. He criticized Loverna's penchant for "new notions, and Castle Building" and her poor household management, and he recommended that she not join Horace in Canada. He also thought this was a good opportunity to teach Horace how to write letters (specifically capitalization) and provided details about laborers, agricultural product prices, and farm machinery. Horace's sister updated him on friends and family relationships, including the features of a newborn or infant baby. His mother added a note to let Horace know that she never forgets him.

Please see the box and folder listing below for detailed information about each letter in the collection.

Collection

Business records, 1989, 2021, and undated

9.5 cubic feet (in 14 boxes)

The collection consists of Schock's recording business correspondence and the actual recordings, mostly of Mount Pleasant area businesses, organizations, people and schools.

This collection consists of Schock’s recording business correspondence, documenting arrangements and ideas for recorded interviews, commercials, dance recitals, and musical recordings, mostly of Mount Pleasant people, businesses, schools, and organizations, and Central Michigan University faculty and students musical productions, 1991-1997, and undated. Included are paper business correspondence, notes, drafts of scripts, as well as informational materials about the businesses and organizations (1 cubic ft.), and the master and draft cassette recordings (in 6 cassette storage boxes). The Mary McGuire School cassettes document activities school teachers and students pursued after receiving a unique state grant. Hash marks in folder descriptions indicate illegible words written on the cassettes.

The David Schock 2021 addition, 1989, 2021, and undated, consists of various videos Schock contributed to with and without the help of Central Michigan University (CMU). Box 8 contains all health-related videos with majority focusing on HIV/AIDS awareness and a few focusing on various systems of the body. Box 9 includes education-related videos, such as a series titled Problem Solving Students, a series from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education videos, and other educational resources. Boxes 10 and 11 house videos filmed in collaboration with the Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) that feature multiple public service announcements (PSAs) and Roll Call videos. Box 12 features raw footage of Schock’s documentary Road to Andersonville. Included with this are interviews for the documentary. Box 13 contains miscellaneous film that do not fit into a clear category. Some examples of this are VHS tapes about quail egg hatching, sculptures, and music.

Box 14 contains materials related to Justice Elizabeth Weaver. Schock helped write Justice Weaver’s book, a copy of which is separately cataloged in the Clarke. Also included are correspondence and interview release forms and Thelma South Schaibly’s 1994 publication of short stories to teach children morals and the meaning of life.

A few folder titles require further description, which we received from the Donor in April 2021. NGS is the abbreviation for the National Geographic Society. Schock created a video for them about geographic education with Mike Libbee of the CMU Geography Department. PDS is likely in collaboration with OHSP. The Hospice Experience documented hospice in Mount Pleasant. The Audition Crashes were stock footage of crashes for the OHSP projects, for example Life’s a Wreck, a film about physics concepts.

The addition is organized by topic, format, and chronological order.

Boxes 8-13 are each 1 cubic foot boxes and Box 14 is .5 cubic foot.

Researchers may also be interested in his personal papers collection, other recordings, and the papers of Elizabeth A. Weaver, which are separately housed and cataloged in the Clarke.

Copyright Note: Copyright is complicated for this collection. CMU holds the copyright for materials used in programs for the CMU Education Materials Center, including interviews from the early 1990s with young people infected with AIDS. The copyright for the Interfaith Ministries immigrant labor tapes, used for final appeals, is held by the Interfaith Ministries, Schock holds the copyright for the Road to Andersonville documentary material, regarding ceremonies held for Michigan Native Americans buried at Andersonville Prison in Andersonville, Georgia.

Permission/Release forms: The only interview permission/release form in the collection is for an interview with one of Elizabeth A. Weaver’s relatives (see Box 14).

Collection

B. Whitney travel diary, 1816

1 volume

This diary (4"x5.75", 105 pages) contains a traveler's impressions while visiting Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., from November 9, 1816-November 26, 1816.

This diary (4" x 5.75", 105 pages) contains a traveler's impressions while visiting Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., from November 9, 1816-November 26, 1816.

Whitney began his travels in New York City on November 9, when he embarked for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. After remaining at Philadelphia for several days, he traveled to Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Following a brief return to Baltimore, he set out for New York, where he arrived on November 26. Throughout his travels, done primarily by steamboat and stage, Whitney noted the quality of his accommodations, both in the major cities and in smaller towns. He wrote more detailed descriptions of his main destinations and of his activities, which included visits to famous locations such as the White House, United States Capitol, and Fort McHenry. While in Washington, D.C., Whitney attended a session of Congress. In addition to sightseeing, he took an interest in mechanical processes, and described visits to a cannon foundry and two glassworks, among other excursions.

Collection

Cadwallader and Jane Colden manuscripts and leaf impressions, 1755, 1765 (majority within 1755)

1 letter, 1 manuscript with leaf impressions, and 1 newspaper clipping

This collection is comprised of a 4-page letter from surveyor and scientist Cadwallader Colden to botanist John Frederic Gronovius (October 1, 1755), in which he enclosed 17 pages of his daughter Jane's botanical descriptions and leaf impressions (1755).

This collection is comprised of a 4-page letter from surveyor and scientist Cadwallader Colden to botanist John Frederic Gronovius (October 1, 1755), in which he enclosed 17 pages of his daughter Jane's botanical descriptions and leaf impressions (1755). Cadwallader Colden mentioned that his previous correspondence may have been delayed on account of the capture of the packet by privateers, remarked on women and botanical study, praised his daughter's willingness to collaborate on botanical projects (and her possible discover of new genera), and expressed his esteem for Carl Linnaeus and the Linnaean system. Colden also mentioned the Royal Garden at Paris and referred to other scientists, including "Dr. Haller" [Albrecht von Haller] and "Mr. Calm" [Peter Kalm].

Colden enclosed a sampling of Jane's botanical work which contains descriptions of plants (e.g. cup, flower, chives, pistil, cover of seed, seeds, seat of the seeds, root, stalk, leaves) and leaf impressions.

The following list of represented plants employs her spelling:
  • No. 299: Diandria Monogynia
  • No. 302: [No name present]
  • No. 300: Tetriandria Digynia
  • No. 241: Pentandria Trigynia
  • No. 291: Didynamia Gymnospermia
  • No. 216: [No name present]
  • No. 215: [No name present]
  • No. 296: Clinopodium (Mountain-Mint)
  • No. 304: Monadelphia Polyandria
  • No. 153: Polyadelphia Enneandria
  • No. 297: Syngenesia Polygamia Superflua (Helenia)
Jane Colden's manuscript includes the following leaf and plant impressions:
  • No. 153: Polyadelphia Enneandria
  • No. 304: Monadelphia Plyandria
  • No. 297: Syngenesia Polygamia Superflua (Helenia)
  • [Not numbered]: Rubus
  • No. 296: Clinopodium (Mountain-Mint)
  • No. 291: Didynamia Gymnospermia
  • No. 299: Diandria Monogynia
  • No. 300: Tetriandria Digynia
  • No. 216: [No name present]
  • No. 215: [No name present]
  • No. 302: [No name present]

A single newspaper clipping from December 14, 1765, accompanies the Colden manuscripts. The clipping includes the text of a letter received by Lieutenant Governor Cadwallader Colden, which prompted his "declaration that he would have nothing to do with the Stamps [Stamp Act, 1765] till the arrival of Sir Henry Moore." The printed letter threatens death to Cadwallader Colden if he were to enforce the Stamp Act. The printed letter contains the text of two labels that were affixed to the effigies of enemies of American liberties hung in Boston on November 4 at the Tree of Liberty.

Collection

Caius Julius Solinus, Polyhistor manuscript, circa 15th century

1 volume (172 pages)

This Caius Julius Solinus, Polyhistor manuscript was produced circa 15th century in Italy and is 86 leaves (plus 4 blank) in a seventeenth-century Italian vellum binding.

This Caius Julius Solinus, Polyhistor manuscript was produced circa 15th century in Italy and is 86 leaves (plus 4 blank) in a seventeenth-century Italian vellum binding. The chapters begin with ornamental capital letters, some colored in green or yellow. The text is a Latin manuscript of Caius Julius Solinus's Polyhistor, discussing natural history, religion, and social questions in the regions known to the Roman Empire circa the middle of the fourth century AD. This copy is a palimpsest, with the previous writing indicating a notarial register or account book from the early fourteenth century. One leaf bears the date 1308 (recto, leaf 53).

The bound volume includes a Di Casa Minutoli Telgrimi stamp and the following colophon: "C. Iulii Solini sive gramatici Polyhistor ab ipso editus et recognitus de situ orbis terrarum & de singulis mirabilibus quae in mundo habentur"

Collection

California and Western Tour photograph album, 1893

1 volume

The California and Western Tour photograph album contains commercial and amateur photographs of scenes in Yosemite National Park, Yellowstone National Park, California, New Mexico, and other locales. The volume includes a group of photographs taken at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, in 1893.

This album (23cm x 30cm) contains 67 commercial and amateur prints of scenes in various locales, particularly in the western United States. The album is bound in red pebbled leather with small gold trim. Many of the photographs are commercial prints as large as 19cm x 24cm, with captions and negative numbers. Manuscript captions accompany some of the items, often with information about the size of natural features shown. Pictures of rock formations, waterfalls, rivers and lakes, and geysers are most common, along with shots of architectural landmarks and groups of tourists. Prominent photograph locations include Yosemite National Park (9 items), Garden of the Gods (4 items), New Mexico (3 items), the Columbia River (3 items), and Yellowstone National Park (20 items). The album has 2 pictures of Niagara Falls, one of which was taken in winter.

Though the album focuses on natural scenery, several photographs show various types of buildings, such as missions in California and New Mexico, hotels in California, the Lick observatory, a group of buildings at the Shasta Springs retreat, a railroad dining car interior, and the exterior of a Chinese restaurant in San Francisco, California. Scenes of horse-drawn carriages fording the Fire Hole River in Yellowstone National Park and passing through a tunnel cut into the trunk of a large tree in Yosemite National Park are present, as are other group photographs. One shows "Miss E. P. Gould" riding a horse, and another shows a group of men fishing on Yellowstone Lake. An 1888 portrait of John C. Frémont, his wife Jessie, and their daughter shows them standing in front of the "Fremont tree" in Redwood Grove. A final group of photographs consists of pictures of various buildings constructed for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois.

Collection

California travel photograph album, 1898

1 volume

The California travel photograph album (17.5 x 14 cm) contains twelve gelatin silver print views of various travel destinations in California in 1898.

The California travel photograph album (17.5 x 14 cm) contains twelve gelatin silver print photographs of various travel destinations in California in 1898. Captions are written below each photograph.

Collection

Calvin A. and Albert H. Irish diaries, 1865-1866, 1885

2 volumes

The Calvin A. and Albert H. Irish diaries consist of 2 volumes. Calvin A. Irish kept a diary from January 1865, during the end of his service in the Union Army, until May 1866. His son, Albert H. Irish, also wrote a diary in 1885.

For his diary, Calvin used a printed almanac entitled Vermont Directory and Commercial Almanac for 1865. The entries are mostly short and detail his daily activities and experiences, including the distance he marched, the weather, letters that he sent or received, and work that he accomplished. The small volume was also Calvin's financial ledger.

Calvin's son Albert also wrote daily records in an almanac entitled The American Diary 1885. The first 2 manuscript pages are comprised of a few verses and adages. Albert's entries are short and include information about the weather, school, chores, odd jobs, and visits of his friends and neighbors. The almanac also contains a short cash-management ledger and brief descriptions of the Irish family's cows.

Collection

Cameron Mackenzie collection, 1943

5 items

This collection is made up of 5 letters that members of the United States Army wrote to Captain Cameron Mackenzie from September 17, 1943-October 27, 1943. The soldiers commented primarily on military life.

This collection is made up of 5 letters that members of the United States Army wrote to Captain Cameron Mackenzie From September 17, 1943-October 27, 1943. The soldiers commented primarily on military life. Mackenzie received 4 letters from men that he had served with in the 170th Field Artillery Battalion or other units, and received one letter from his uncle, Lieutenant Colonel George H. Davis. See the Detailed Box and Folder Listing for more information.

Collection

Camp Hancock letters, 1917

3 items

An anonymous United States Army sergeant wrote these 3 letters (18 pages) to his mother while serving at Camp Hancock, Georgia, between August and December 1917. "Herb," a member of Company D, 103rd Engineer Regiment, reported on his regiment's work laying pipes and about several aspects of military life.

An anonymous United States Army sergeant wrote these 3 letters (18 pages) to his mother while serving at Camp Hancock, Georgia, between August and December 1917. "Herb," a member of Company D, 103rd Engineer Regiment, reported on his regiment's work laying pipes and on several aspects of military life.

In each of his letters, "Herb" encouraged his mother not to worry about him, and he took pride in his work with the military and in his continuing advancement through the ranks; he was expecting a commission as lieutenant. He also mentioned some of his regiment's duties, which included laying pipes for newly constructed buildings at Camp Hancock and building temporary bridges for other units on bivouac assignments. Herb described other aspects of camp life, such as the comings and goings of other soldiers and his leisure activities, which included trips to nearby Augusta and football games. In two of his letters, he discussed the reorganization of the army's cavalry and artillery units, and in one letter, he mentioned English and French guest officers' instruction in trench warfare (November 11, 1917).

Collection

Camp Lin-E-Kin photograph album, ca. 1920

1 volume

The Camp Lin-E-Kin photograph album (16 x 24 cm) contains 36 photographs of people and activities at a girls' camp in Maine.

The Camp Lin-E-Kin photograph album (16 x 24 cm) contains 36 photographs of people and activities at a girls' camp in Maine. Images depict varied activities: hiking, boating, dancing, and calisthenics. Of interest are numerous photographs of girls wearing costumes and a group wearing swimming outfits, an image of a cabin interior with girls writing letters and knitting, and two photographs of girls holding cameras. An envelope with 10 additional photographs is laid in the album.

The album has a black cloth cover tied with string; housed in a grey board wrap with blue cloth spine.

Collection

Canedy Family Hair album, 1863

1 volume

This small hand-made volume contains 24 locks of men and women's hair, some of them tied with ribbon, braided, or looped. While its creator is not indicated, internal evidence suggests that Maryette Canedy of Northfield, Minnesota, likely compiled the booklet in 1863, to document friends and relatives in Minnesota and Vermont. A pencil, colored pencil, and ink illustration of a woman holding a bouquet of flowers is pasted on the front cover. Its inscription includes "Miss Emely [Shurpy?] drawing," her residence in Northfield, Minnesota, and the date of January 25, 1863.

This small hand-made volume contains 24 locks of men and women's hair, some of them tied with ribbon, braided, or looped. While its creator is not indicated, internal evidence suggests that Maryette Canedy of Northfield, Minnesota, likely compiled the booklet in 1863, to document friends and relatives in Minnesota and Vermont. A pencil, colored pencil, and ink illustration of a woman holding a bouquet of flowers is pasted on the front cover. Its inscription includes "Miss Emely [Shurpy?] drawing," her residence in Northfield, Minnesota, and the date of January 25, 1863.

Each lock of hair is accompanied by one or more of the following types of information:
  • The name of the individual who provided the hair.
  • The place the person lived, such as Stanford [i.e. Stamford, Vermont]; Wilmington, [Vermont]; North Adams, [Massachusetts]; and Northfield, Minnesota.
  • Short sayings or further identifying information. For example, the entries for Charles C. Phipps, Anna Phipps, and Anna Canedy mention their relationship to the compiler: grandfather, grandmother, and mother, respectively.
  • The age of the individual when the clipping was taken.

Maryette Canedy's hair sample is missing.

Collection

Captain William C. Bacon Michigan Car Ferries Collection, 1883, 2010, and undated

27 cubic foot (in 25 boxes, 5 Oversized folders)

The collection includes papers, volumes, photographic materials, keys, and blueprints. The focus of the collection is Michigan ferries and the Ann Arbor Railroad Company ferries, but other ferries and boats are also documented, as well as railroads, towns, related topics, and people.

The papers are divided into two main series: Captain Bacon’s personal materials (approximately .5 cubic foot), and Ferries, Ferry-Related Materials (the rest of the collection).

Captain Bacon’s personal materials include mostly correspondence about ferries, shipping, shipping history, his dismissal, Benzie Area Historical Museum, his membership cards, photographs, and legal documents.

The Ferries and Ferry Related Materials include employment agreements and memorandum between company employees and the company, usually the Ann Arbor Railroad Company related to ferries; Ann Arbor Boat Company organizational records, 1916-1958; photographs, blueprints, correspondence, certificates of inspection and enrollment, sales records, reconstruction records, licenses, financial records, casualty records, log books, marine shop time books, keys, specifications for parts, mostly propellers, oil and lubrication books, and other materials documenting numerous ferries including the Ann Arbor No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No. 7, Arthur K. Atkinson (originally Ann Arbor No. 6), Badger, City of Midland 41, City of Green Bay, City of Milwaukee, Viking (originally Ann Arbor No. 7), Wabash (originally City of Green Bay), and the Grand Haven; Ann Arbor Railroad Company organizational records re: trains and ferries, 1895-1992, undated; Benzie Area Historical Museum and Historical Society materials; Correspondence from Superintendents of Steamships; information on various railroads, ship building companies; information on Benzie, Elberta, and Frankfort, Michigan; Information Bacon was going to include or not include in his book; various I.C.C. (Interstate Commerce Commission) dockets, decisions, and applications concerning railroads and car ferries; Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company materials; related court cases, particularly about abandonment of the ferries or parts of railways; materials documenting Michigan and other railroad reorganization or rationalization plans; various annual reports; newspaper clippings (copies) of many ferries, railroads, and related topics; numerous reports; job information, lists of positions and duties. Other materials document (somewhat) unions, such as BRAC (Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks); administration units, and officers, such as the Association of Maritime Officers.

Besides I.C.C. and railroad plans railroads are also documented in stock certificates, passes, calendars, tariffs, and other materials. Specific railroads well documented in the collection include the Ann Arbor Railroad Company, Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Company/ Chessie System, and the Detroit, Toledo, and Ironton Railroad Company. Other railroad companies for which at least one item is found in the collection include: Escanaba and Lake Superior, Grand Truck Western, Green Bay and Minnesota, Manistee and North-East, Manistique and Lake Superior, and Pere Marquette, and Conrail.

Photographic materials includes photographs, negatives, postcards, and slides, and is comprised of three main subgroups, railroads, ships (ferries and other boats, ships), and lumbering. The Ships section is by far the largest portion of photographs focusing mainly on car ferries. Car Ferries across Michigan are featured, notably the: Ann Arbor Car Ferry 1-7, Arthur K. Atkinson, the Badger, Viking, Ludington Car Ferry, Sparta, and several from Wisconsin. The collection is extensive and covers the time period between 1880s to the early 2000s. Many of these images were in acidic photograph albums or scrapbooks from which they were removed. There are also some oversized photographic materials. Slides are found in Box #25. Lumbering is documented solely through photographs, 1899-1915, undated.

Oversized materials include various car ferry records, photographs, some maps showing railroad property and lines, and blueprints (9 Oversized folders), as well as other materials. The blueprints are mainly ferry propellers, shafts, valves, deck arrangements, and other parts. The blueprints are housed in a map cabinet due to their size.

Ferry keys are found in two small boxes (Boxes #23-24).

In Box 15, item 1, the license for Art Frederickson is really unusual. Art was an Ann Arbor captain who was well known on the lakes. He and his wife, Lucy, wrote several books on the car ferries and sold shipwreck maps in the 1960s-1970s. Their collection was sold to the Institute for Great Lakes Research (now the Historical Collections of the Great Lakes) at BGSU. Seven books about ferries, trains, ships, and shipwrecks by Arthur C. Frederickson are separately cataloged and in the Clarke’s book collection.

In Box 15 the last item, Development and Design of Lake MI Car Ferries, Paper Presented, 1948, by Art Zuehlke, who was the man at Manitowoc Shipbuilding. There is a memorial to him at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum. The Manitowoc Shipbuilding Collection is at the museum.

Spelling Note: There were inconsistencies in the collection as to how car ferries or carferries are spelled, as well as Michigan, Mich., or MI, and the way company names are abbreviated. These inconsistencies were continued in the Box and Folder listing. If Bacon titled a folder with an acronym, such as BRAC, that is how it is presented here, with a note to explain what BRAC is. Sometimes vessels were listed as M/V or M.V. (motor vessel) or S.S. or S/S (steam ship) and sometimes not.

Processing Note: Approximately 18 cubic ft. of duplicates, materials that were fragile, acidic, or moldy, and had to be photocopied, materials that included social security numbers, any materials of investigations and grievances of ferry employees, Bacon’s personal bills, medication directions, and any reading, blank, or peripheral materials were withdrawn from the collection. In addition, a large number of publications 121 items were separately cataloged as books, manuals, or serials, and added to the Clarke publications collection.

Allergy Note: Please note that some of the materials have a musty smell to them, especially most of the oversized volumes. Researchers with allergies should use these materials with care.

Collection

Caribbean photograph album, [ca. 1890s]

1 volume

The Caribbean photograph album contains photographs of towns, scenery, and people in Jamaica, Saint Vincent, Barbados, and Trinidad.

This photograph album (19cm x 26cm) contains 77 photographs of towns, scenery, and people throughout the Caribbean. Most pictures are 14cm x 22cm, though a few are 10cm x 15cm, and many have lengthy captions with additional information about locales pictured; many are numbered. Captions include information about hotel rates, population figures, vegetation, geographic features, and local customs. The photographs show Jamaica (43 items), Barbados (13 items), Trinidad (12 items), local residents (4 items), Saint Vincent (3 items), and other scenes (2 items). The album has many views of city streets and towns taken from street level and from higher vantage points, as well as views of rivers in Saint Vincent and Jamaica and of Carlisle Bay, Barbados. Structures such as sugar plantation windmills, railroad stations, hotels, markets, a prison, and churches are visible in many pictures, as are residents and, less often, tourists. A group of 4 photographs at the end of the album show East Indian women who worked in Trinidad, and 3 photographs show members of the West Indian Regiment and its band, including 1 picture of the band playing in a gazebo. Harbor views show Royal Navy ships and other vessels. The album's covers have a hard cloth covering, and the pages are bound together with rope. One loose page has been removed from the volume.

Collection

Carl Bauder letters, 1918

3 items

This collection consists of three letters written by Carl B. Bauder of the 135th Field Artillery Regiment to his friend, Lieutenant Ralph F. Henn, during his service in France with the American Expeditionary Forces in the First World War.

This collection consists of three letters written by Carl B. Bauder of the 135th Field Artillery Regiment to his friend, Lieutenant Ralph F. Henn, during his service in France with the American Expeditionary Forces in the First World War. In his first letter, Bauder discussed his duties, which included operating a machine gun against enemy airplanes; as he wrote to his friend, "we… have about completed our overseas training whence we hope we will get our crack at the Hun in the very near future" (September 8, 1918). He also attached a copy of The Endeavor Weekly, a newsletter published by Cleveland's Euclid Avenue Christian Church "for our boys in service," which encourages its readers to send a letter or card to Carl, one of five soldiers selected to receive mail. In his second letter, written on September 29, he briefly related his unit's general movements, but still felt "a long way from cleaning up the hun with our little gun." His third and longest letter (8 pages), dated November 24, 1918, recounts his military experiences in greater detail, including his specific movements since June 1918, copied from his diary. In addition to expressing his relief at the happy outcome of Ralph's recent bout of influenza, the soldier reflected at length upon his military experiences: "Though our period in active service has been comparatively short, I think I have experienced most of the things which an artilleryman ordinarily would," he wrote, and mentioned field combat, watching aerial battles, and being attacked by a submarine en route to Europe. Two of the letters are composed on YMCA stationery.

Collection

Carlyle Harris trial postcards, 1893

8 items

This collection is made up of eight partially printed postcards addressed to Governor of New York Roswell P. Flower, respecting the trial of convicted murderer Carlyle Harris (1868-1893). Harris secretly married Mary Helen Potts in 1890. After a traumatic termination of pregnancy and ensuing family issues, Helen took medication tainted with a lethal dose of morphine given to her by Harris. These postcards are from citizens in New York, Chicago, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C., offering their opinions on Harris' sentence. They suggest commuting his sentence to 10 years, examining him to find out if he suffered the effects of being "electro magnetised", endorsing capital punishment for the "devilish" crime, and believing that he was innocent.

This collection is made up of eight partially printed postcards addressed to Governor of New York Roswell P. Flower, respecting the trial of convicted murderer Carlyle Harris (1868-1893). Harris secretly married Mary Helen Potts in 1890. After a traumatic termination of pregnancy and ensuing family issues, Helen took medication tainted with a lethal dose of morphine. These postcards are from citizens in New York, Chicago, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C., offering their opinions on Harris' sentence. They suggest commuting his sentence to 10 years, examining him to find out if he suffered the effects of being "electro magnetised", endorsing capital punishment for the "devilish" crime, and believing that he was innocent.