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Collection

Robert Alexander Papers, 1970-1982

2.5 linear feet

Ann Arbor, Michigan political activist and campaign worker on behalf of Human Rights Party and Democratic Party candidates. Files and photographs (circa 1970-1980) relating to the Fred Harris presidential campaign in 1976, the Ed Pierce campaigns for Michigan state office in 1976, 1978, 1980 and 1982, and the Zolton Ferency campaign for governor of Michigan in 1978.

The papers of Robert Alexander span the years 1970-1982. The primary focus of the collection is on Alexander's political activities in both the Human Rights Party and the Democratic Party. There is no personal material, nor is there documentation of Alexander's career. Even within the sections on his political activities there is only a moderate amount specifically relating to Alexander. The papers give a view of local politics, in which Alexander was a relatively minor figure.

Collection

Contemporary History Project (The New Left in Ann Arbor, Mich.) transcripts of oral interviews, 1978-1979

1 linear foot

Transcripts of oral history project relating to the political and social protests of the 1950s and 1960s, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The collection consists of fifty transcripts of oral history interviews relating to political and social protests in Ann Arbor in the 1950s and 1960s. Topics of discussion in the interview include civil rights demonstrations, draft resistance and other opposition to the Vietnam War, feminism and the equal rights movement, alternative lifestyles, gay rights, the drug culture, student rights, and the influence of rock and roll music. The interviewees include Arnie Bachner, Larry Behnke, Frithjof Bergmann, Walter Blackwell, Barry Bluestone, Elise Boulding, Bunyan Bryant, Eric Chester, Tania Cordes, Jerry DeGrieck, Peter Dilorenzi, Richard Feldman, Miriam Flacks, Richard Flacks, Robben Wright Fleming, Madison James Foster, Barbara Fuller, Todd Gitlin, Gail Grigsby, Barbara Haber, William Haber, Tom Hayden, Larry Hunter, Edward James, Sharon Jeffrey, Ken Kelley, Walter Krasny, Diane Kohn, Howard Kohn, John Leggett, Richard Mann, Robert Meeropol, James G. Mellen, Fredrick L. Miller, Martha Prescod Norman, Beth Oglesby, Carl Oglesby, Marge Piercy, Genie Plamondon, Paul Potter, Randy Potts, Nais Raulet, Robert Ross, Ezra Rowry, Gayle Rubin, John Sinclair, Leni Sinclair, Eda Spielman, Milton Taube, Nancy Wechsler, and Marilyn Young.

Collection

James Edward Davis papers, 1929-2014 (majority within 1950-1975)

5 linear feet

James Edward Davis is a teacher who has worked within the Dearborn Public School District, Michigan since he graduated from the University of Michigan. He has been active politically, especially in regards to teacher's rights, and within Michigan churches. The collection contains series of personal biographical papers, family papers, as well as his collected materials from local churches and schools.

Materials include Davis family history, his father's reminiscences of life in Clinton, Michigan, and relating to the United Church of Christ of Clinton, and some personal and biographical papers; pamphlets and flyers relating to student political activities at the University of Michigan; collected materials about local Michigan churches, many of them in Dexter, Mich.; collected materials about Dearborn Public Schools system and schools in Michigan.

Collection

Bret Eynon papers, 1966-1977

1 linear foot

Student at the University of Michigan, collected materials relating to his interest in the radical causes and issues of the 1960s and 1970s.

The Bret Eynon collection consists of original and collected material relating to his interest in the radical causes and issues of the 1960s and 1970s. The files, arranged by topic, relate to the Black Action Movement (BAM) strike at the University of Michigan, John Sinclair, draft resistance, protests about the war in Vietnam, the Welfare Rights Organization, and feminism and the women's movement.

Collection

Harlan Henthorne Hatcher Papers, 1837-1998 (majority within 1891-1986)

72 linear feet — 1 oversize folder — 1.1 GB (online)

Online
Harlan Henthorne Hatcher (1898-1998) was president of the University of Michigan from 1951 to 1967. The papers span the years 1837-1998 and document Dr. Hatcher's University of Michigan presidency, Ohio State University career, literary career, organizational involvement, personal life, and family history. Includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, speeches, yearly datebooks, oral history interview transcripts, magnetic audio tape recordings, an audiocassette recording, and photographs.

The Harlan Henthorne Hatcher Papers document his University of Michigan presidency, Ohio State University career, literary career, organizational involvement, personal life, and family history. The collection spans the years 1837-1998, with the bulk of the materials covering 1891-1986. It includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, speeches, yearly datebooks, oral history interview transcripts, magnetic audio tape recordings, an audiocassette recording, and photographs. The collection is strongest in its documentation of Dr. Hatcher's presidency at the University of Michigan, especially in correspondence and speeches. Documentation is weakest on the subjects of his Ohio State University career before 1944 and organizational involvement before 1967. The collection may be useful to researchers interested in the history of the University of Michigan from 1951-1967, the duties of university administrators and their spouses, authors of the 1920's to 1950's, and environmental activism in Michigan in the 1970's and 1980's.

The Harlan Hatcher collection has been divided into two subgroups of files: those which were created or accumulated from his tenure as president of the University of Michigan (1951-1967) and those materials (mainly personal) dated either prior to or subsequent to Hatcher's presidential years.

The library, as archives of the University of Michigan, is the repository for all of the files of its presidents. For historic reasons, all of the papers of presidents up to and including Harlan Hatcher have been treated as personal collections and cataloged under the name of the president. Beginning with Hatcher's successor - Robben Fleming - and continuing to the present, the files of individuals occupying the president's office have been considered both personal and institutional. Records created from an individual's responsibility as president, usually materials from the years when he was president, are treated as office files and have been cataloged as part of the University of Michigan President's Office record group. Materials from either before or after an individual's tenure as president have been treated separately and have been cataloged under that president's name.

Collection

Human Rights Party (Ann Arbor, Mich.) records, 1970-1979 (majority within 1971-1975)

3 linear feet — 1 oversize folder

The Human Rights Party (HRP) of Ann Arbor was a radical socialist third party that influenced local politics in the period 1971 to 1975. The record group contains organizational and campaign documents of several parties including predecessor and successor parties to HRP. Campaign materials, platforms, position statements and numerous newspaper clippings along with committee and meeting minutes form the bulk of the records of this activist organization.

The records of HRP consist mainly of campaign activities, campaign issues, platforms, and clippings. The record group is divided into six series: Radical Independent Party, 1970-1971, Human Rights Party Organization, 1972-1975, HRP Campaigns, Socialist Human Rights Party, 1975-1977, Human Rights Party of Michigan, 1971-1976, and the People's Party, 1972-1979. In this collection, focal political issues are filed under the Steering Committee, if not separately foldered. Clippings are a major source of information and researchers should consult them for details.

Collection

Harry Burns Hutchins papers, 1879-1930

22 linear feet

Professor of law and president of the University of Michigan. Papers include correspondence, reports, and speeches relating to all aspects of his University activities; and visual materials.

The Harry B. Hutchins papers cover the years 1879 through 1929, and include records generated during his years as professor and dean of the law department, President of the University of Michigan, and in retirement. Boxes 1-18 are primarily comprised of correspondence. Reports of the departments, schools, and other units of the university are contained in box 19, folders 30-32, and box 20, folders 1-13. As president, Hutchins did not regularly submit annual reports to the Board of Regents. Additional materials include speeches, photographs, and biographical material.

Collection

Ralph W. Muncy papers, circa 1830-1992

15.5 linear feet (in 16 boxes)

Socialist Labor Party member, later member of the League for Socialist Reconstruction. Correspondence, campaign files, audio-tapes, and other materials largely concerning his work with the State Central Committee of the Socialist Labor Party and Socialist Reconstruction, 1928-1992; and collected family materials including letters and memoirs of Levi Muncy, soldier during the Civil War; also photographs.

The Ralph Muncy collection consists primarily of papers relating to his interest in socialist political activities. A smaller portion of the collection documents the involvement of his wife, Lydia B. Muncy, in the socialist cause. Together they also collected materials relating to the history of their families (Muncy-Baird). Included is much original family material dating back into the nineteenth century. The Ralph Muncy papers have been arranged into the following series: Correspondence; Topical Files; and Ralph Muncy and Lydia Baird Muncy Personal.

Collection

Alexander G. Ruthven Papers, 1901-1961 (majority within 1906-1951)

65.4 linear feet — 1 oversize folder

Zoologist, college professor, president of University of Michigan, 1929-1951. Professional files relating to his career with the University Museum and as a professor of zoology, and presidential files containing correspondence, reports, speeches, and other University materials, including budget and legislative files, material relating to changes in University administration, his relationship with faculty, students and alumni, and photographs.

The Alexander Ruthven papers consists of two series of records. The first is the papers of Ruthven as president of the University of Michigan, 1929 to 1951. The second, and smaller, series is the files maintained by Ruthven as a zoologist with the University Museum and as professor of zoology. This latter series dates largely from 1908 to 1929 but also includes collected earlier files from the 1870s.

Collection

John and Leni Sinclair papers, 1957-2003

66.5 linear feet (in 82 boxes) — 1 oversize folder (UAl) — 1 oversize volume — 33 open reel videotapes — 727.7 GB (online)

Online
John and Leni Sinclair were leaders of the counterculture movement in Michigan, organizers of radical social, political, and cultural endeavors primarily in the areas of music, poetry, graphic design, and community welfare projects. Papers and photographs (1957-1979) relating to all phases of their careers, including participation in the Artists' Workshop in Detroit, the Rainbow Multi-Media Corporation, the White Panther Party and its offshoot, the Rainbow Peoples Party; also materials concerning the legalization of marijuana, radical politics, and prison reform. Also material, 1979-2000, relating to John Sinclair's work as a writer, performer, radio show host and music promoter.

The John Sinclair papers came to the library in 1979. Jointly donated by John and Leni Sinclair, this initial accession, covering the period 1957-1979, included textual material, sound recordings, and photographs relating to all phases of their careers, including participation in the Artists' Workshop in Detroit, the Rainbow Multi-Media Corporation, the White Panther Party and its offshoot, the Rainbow Peoples Party; also materials concerning the legalization of marijuana, radical politics, prison reform, and rock and jazz music.

The Sinclair papers provide a rich and unique source for the study of America's radical movement in the nineteen sixties and seventies. Beginning with a remarkable series of correspondence that includes letters from Abbie Hoffman, Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary, and Jerry Rubin, and continuing on through extensive subject files, the collection details the cultural, political and business activities of a man whose energy and charisma made him a local and national leader of the counterculture. In addition, the collection documents the support and creativity of his wife and partner, who as writer, photographer and publicist helped to showcase the lifestyle which he symbolized.

Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, John Sinclair added to his papers with materials relating to his career as a writer and performer. In the winter of 2000, he donated a second large accession relating mainly to the period since leaving Detroit for New Orleans.

The Sinclair collection has been divided into four subgroups: Textual Files, Printed Material, Sound Recordings, and Visual Material.