Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subjects Navigation--Study and teaching. Remove constraint Subjects: Navigation--Study and teaching.
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection

James West, Elements of Navigation, 1785

1 volume

Elements of Navigation, a manuscript adaptation of John Robertson’s work of the same name, provides instruction and practical exercises in arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, geography, astronomy, and navigational principles (781 pages). The volume is heavily illustrated with mathematical diagrams. It also contains a 1785 copy of a ship log for a 1772 voyage from England to Madeira, (21 pages).

"Elements of Navigation," a manuscript adaptation of John Robertson’s work of the same name, provides instruction and practical exercises in arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, geography, astronomy, and navigational principles (781 pages). The volume is illustrated with mathematical diagrams. It also contains a 1785 copy of a ship's log for a 1772 voyage from England to Madeira (21 pages). The book is divided into 14 primary chapters, 11 of them preceded by an ink or watercolor illustration of buildings, ships, and places, such as the watercolor drawings "The Desire in a Storm" and "A west View of Islington, old Church." (See below for complete list.) Several chapters are further divided into sections, and most chapters or sections are followed by problems, questions, case studies, answers, and explanations. Please see the box and folder listing below for a table of contents.

The volume begins with explanations of basic mathematical principles, including arithmetic operations, decimals and fractions, roots and powers, notation, and "Tables of English Money, Weights, and Measures" (pp. 9 verso-10 verso). This chapter is followed by theorems and problems of geometry and trigonometry. The subsequent section on geography contains prose explanations of the discipline's foundations, such as the shape of the Earth, the concept of latitude and longitude, and the currently known world. Remarks on the continents are accompanied by tables showing major countries, principal cities, rivers, and mountains. The tables for North and South America are split, and individual states within the United States are identified as "countries," as are California, New Mexico, Old Mexico, Louisiana, Canada, New Britain, New Wales, and others. Introductory geographic material also includes content on winds, tides, and bodies of water. A segment on "chronology" introduces several scales for measuring time, and explains the reasoning behind concepts such as the leap year and the "Golden Number" (pp. 147-147 verso).

The remainder of the work focuses on the art of maritime navigation. Several topics include: the calculation of compound courses, oblique and windward sailing, sailing in currents, and globular sailing. The sections devoted to each topic are comprised primarily of rules or theorems, exercises, and illustrations of practical applicability. A chapter on "spherics" introduces spherical geometry and trigonometry. Two chapters on astronomy explain concepts in "star astronomy," "terrestrial astronomy," and "spherical astronomy," such as the composition of the Solar System, planetary movements, and mathematical applications. The final 80 pages contain information on the art of sailing and expand on principles previously discussed. These pages include instructions on how to calculate the location of a ship at sea, make necessary observations, and correct a ship's course, among other similar topics.

The final 21 pages consist of a log from an unknown ship traveling from England to Madeira in 1772, transcribed by James West in 1785. Between July 2 and July 11, the log contains notes on the weather, wind direction, and general remarks of occurrences on board as the ship prepared for its journey at Deptford, London. On one occasion, the author mentioned a sailor being disciplined for drunkenness (July 3). Between July 12 and July 28, the log documents the weather, wind direction, ship's location, use of various sails, and other information compiled throughout the course of each day. The ship arrived at Madeira on July 28. The log is followed by a brief note by James West concerning the location of Funchal, Madeira.

The non-mathematical illustrations separating the book's chapters are done in ink or watercolor, and depict rural scenes and sailing ships.

These are:
  • [View of a village, with a man fishing in a river], p. 2
  • [View of a river, with a cylindrical building in the foreground and a church in the background], p. 76
  • [View of an arched gateway, with attached buildings and bridge], p. 114
  • [View of a stone building with a high-peaked roof, alongside a body of water], p. 138
  • "The Victor in a calm sea," p. 187
  • [Oval-framed view of two persons sitting beside a river, with a ship and fortifications in the background], p. 202
  • "The Desire in a Storm," p. 223
  • [Oval-framed view of a small sailing vessel on shore beside a stone building], p. 241
  • "A west View of Islington, Old Church," p. 267
  • "Teneirs House," p. 319
  • "At Abingdon 1782," p. 349

The royal coat of arms of the British monarch is imprinted on the volume's front and back covers.

Collection

John Morison copybook, 1764-1772

1 volume

John Morison of Windham, New Hampshire, compiled this mathematical cypher book, containing extensive notes and practice problems on sailing, surveying, trigonometry, accounting, weights and measures, arithmetic, algebra, fractions, decimals, geometry, geodesia, and navigation. Many of the signatures are of different-size paper and stitched together using different thread. The final signature is upside down from the rest of the volume and contains penmanship practice, poetry, a song, scattered family names, miscellaneous figures, and drawings (including a windmill).

John Morison of Windham, New Hampshire, compiled this mathematical cypher book, containing extensive notes and practice problems on sailing, surveying, trigonometry, accounting, weights and measures, arithmetic, algebra, fractions, decimals, geometry, geodesia, and navigation. Many of the signatures are of different-size paper and stitched together using different thread. The final signature is upside down from the rest of the volume and contains penmanship practice, poetry, a song, scattered family names, miscellaneous figures, and drawings (including a windmill).

List of Contents:
  • Cases [these pages are severely damaged along the foredge with loss to significant text]
  • Division of Coin, Weights &c [these pages are severely damaged along the foredge with significant loss of text]
  • Reduction descending & ascending [application of multiplication and division]
  • Tare & Trett &c [weights and measures between vendor and customer]
  • The Single Rule of Three Direct
  • Rule of Three Reverse
  • The Double Rule of Three Direct
  • The Double Rule of Three Reverse
  • Compound Proportion
  • Simple Interest
  • Compound Company
  • Factor's Allowance
  • Interest for Months ; For Weeks ; Interest for Days
  • Rebate or Discount
  • Equation of Payment
  • Barter
  • Profit & Loss
  • Simple Company
  • Exchange [currency exchange]
  • Comparison Weights & Measures
  • Alligation Alternate
  • Double Position, or Negative Arithmetic
  • Progression Arithmetical
  • Geometrical Progression
  • Permutation, or Changing the order of Things
  • Vulgar Fractions & first of Reduction
  • Addition of Vulgar
  • Subtraction of Vulgar
  • Multiplication of Vulgar Fractions
  • Division of Vulgar Fractions
  • Addition of Decimals ; Subtraction of Decimals
  • Multiplication of Decimals ; Division of Decimals
  • Reduction of Decimals
  • Simple Rule of Three Direct in Decimals
  • Practical Geometry
  • Plain Trigonometry Rectangular
  • Extraction of the Square Root &c &c
  • Extraction of the Cube Root
  • Surveying &c. &c. &c.
  • Mensuration Surveying &c.
  • [Draft of a legal document related land/labor]
  • Algebra
  • Numerical Algebra
  • Evolution of Whole Quantities
  • Fractions
  • Evolution of Fractional Quantities
  • Addition & Subtraction of Surd Quantities ; Multiplication of Surds ; Involution of Surds
  • Reduction by Involution
  • Of Analyses, or the Method of Resolving Problems
  • Practical Geometry
  • Plain Trigonometry Rectangular
  • Plain Trigonometry Obliquangular
  • Plain Sailing the First Part
  • Plain Sailing the Second Part
  • Traverse Sailing
  • Oblique Sailing
  • Mercator's Sailing
  • Middle Latitude Sailing
  • Geodesia or Surveying [with a landscape cross section, a sketch of a field, and a sketch of a tower]
  • Alimetry & Longimetry [with one sketch of a tower in a field, a sketch of a windmill, large building, and tree]
  • Variation of the Compass
  • Dialing [with one sketch of a horizontal dial]
Final section (upside down from rest of volume)
  • Penmanship practice, repeated copies of: "Know all men by these Presents that I John morison of the Perish of Windam", "ten things A Penman should have Near at Hand" [sadly, the ten things are not listed], and "from thy Desk to keep thy breast from harm upright thy head", and others.
  • Multiplication table and many miscellaneous scribbled mathematical notations and problems.
  • Some poetry and many partial words, family names, and letter practice.
  • "[New?] Song with its own tune Prented 1764" on a relationship separation in which the man was scorned by the woman, but then on her remorse they reunited.
Collection

Letters to the Editor of the United Service Journal, 1829-1837

54 items

The collection consists of letters and essays submitted to the editor of the United Service Journal for publication, principally regarding British naval and military matters.

The collection consists of letters and essays submitted to the editor of the United Service Journal for publication, principally regarding British naval and military matters. Topics range from naval architecture, technology, and weaponry, to histories of naval and specific military engagements and defenses of individual persons. The letters also regard such matters as the recovery of the HMS Thetis off the Brazilian coast, charities and education efforts, discipline, piracy, officer promotions, and military mortality in Canada. Several letters reference disagreements over articles published in the United Service Journal.

Collection

New England Schoolmaster's teaching book, 1787-1811

1 volume

In this book, a traveling New England schoolteacher recorded instructional exercises, instructional explanations, poetry, and biographical information about pupils. The author taught in New Hampshire and present-day Maine. Subjects of instruction include arithmetic, surveying, geometry, nautical navigation, and writing.

A traveling New England schoolteacher recorded instructional exercises, instructional explanations, poetry, and biographical information about pupils in this volume (220 pages, 8" x 12") between 1787 and 1811. The author taught in New Hampshire and present-day Maine and entered personal information about teaching appointments throughout the volume. Individual lessons are dated as early as 1787, and the volume includes several lists of male and female pupils from teaching engagements in various towns, dated as late as 1811. Some lists of students are accompanied by the students' birthdates. Classes convened in schoolhouses, other public structures, and private homes.

Each page has a subject label, and several pages are comprised of miscellaneous questions entitled "A Collection of Questions," occasionally attributed to The London Magazine. Much of the volume pertains to instruction in mathematical subjects such as algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, and it includes diagrams, examples, and practical applications. Lengthy sections are devoted to surveying and nautical navigation (including "plane-sailing"), often with many diagrams. Other sections concern subjects such as writing and history, with examples of proverbs, deeds, marriage licenses, and letters for copying. Some pages have collections of anecdotes, proverbs, and poems, usually pertaining to morality and religion. A number of lengthier poems concern death and weddings, and one is entitled "Rodgers & Victory[:] Tit for tat. Or the Chesapeake paid for in British Blood!!!" Other parts include a cure for jaundice, a "rebus," a table of symbols for astronomical objects, information about "Occult Philosophy or Magic," instructions for gauging a copper kettle and a man of war, and a list of nouns with corresponding verbs and participles. Some of the material is copied from outside sources, such as John Love's Geodesia.