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Collection

Sidney Fine collected research materials, circa 1900-1970s

13 linear feet (in 14 boxes)

Professor of history at the University of Michigan; collected materials pertaining to his research interests.

This collection consists of that research material accumulated by Sidney Fine in the course of research for his various monographs on the New Deal, the Detroit Riot of 1967, and his study of Walter Drew.

Collection

Arts of Citizenship Program (University of Michigan) records, 1997-2007

2.75 linear feet — 1.2 GB (online) — 5 digital audiovisual files

Online
The Arts of Citizenship Program at the University of Michigan fostered the role of the arts and humanities through collaborative cultural partnerships and community projects in the Ann Arbor and Detroit area. The program aimed to enrich public life and to enlarge the university's educational mission. These records contains notes, correspondence, publicity, audiovisual materials, presentations, and other material documenting the administration, public programming, and community partnerships undertaken by the Arts of Citizenship program. Also included is a website capture taken July 18, 2005.

The Arts of Citizenship (AOC) Program documentation consists of notes, correspondence, publicity, audiovisual materials (audiocassettes, digital materials, videotapes), and other material documenting the daily administrative activities, public programming, outreach, research, and community partnerships. The record group is divided into three series: Administration, Project Files, and Website. These series represent the original order of materials as received upon accession. The researcher should note that the records do not provide an in-depth portrayal of AOC, but rather information about the operation, functions, and details on specific projects undertaken by the program.

Collection

Dominic Capeci Detroit Oral History Project collection, 1978-2019 (majority within 1978-2000)

27.64 GB (online)

Online
Professor of African American History at Missouri State University and expert on the Detroit race riot of 1943 and race relations in Detroit during World War II. Oral history interviews and autobiographical information about Capeci.

The Dominic Capeci Detroit Oral History Project collection (27.64 GB) features oral history interviews Capeci conducted about the Detroit race riot of 1943, the Detroit race riot of 1967, and Detroit during World War II. It also includes autobiographical information about Capeci's life and his career as professor of African American History.

Collection

Aberbach-Walker Detroit Riot Studies records, 1967-1971

24 linear feet

Records, 1967-1971, of the studies on the Detroit riot of 1967 conducted by Joel Aberbach and Jack Walker, staff members of the Institute of Public Policy Studies of the University of Michigan. Includes survey forms (1967, 1968 and 1971) and audio-tapes of interviews with Detroit civic leaders and administrative records of the project.

Measuring 24 linear feet, the records are divided into three series, one for each "wave" of interviews. The 1967 Survey Forms (13 linear feet) consists solely of completed survey forms. Each form is approximately 40 pages in length and asked respondents to answer a wide variety of searching questions. Information is regularly recorded on survey scales, but interviewers frequently augmented this information through annotations on the form.

The 1968 Survey material (3 linear feet) consists primarily of completed 1968 survey forms, which were about 30 pages each in length and similar in content to the 1967 instrument. In addition there are interviews with civic leaders that consist of both a survey form and a tape recording of the interview.

The 1971 Survey material (8 linear feet) consists primarily of survey forms that are very similar to those used in 1968.

Collection

Lincoln Highway Association Records, 1911-1941 (majority within 1912-1930)

6 linear ft. and 1 portfolio

Formed in 1913 by Carl G. Fisher, Frank A. Seiberling, and Henry B. Joy, the Lincoln Highway Association was made up of representatives from the automobile, tire, and cement industries. The Association aimed to plan, fund, construct, and promote the first transcontinental highway in North America. The route ran from New York to San Francisco, and covered approximately 3,400 miles. The Detroit headquarters of the Association closed in 1928. This collection contains: correspondence, particularly between members of the Association and government officials; meeting minutes; reports, bulletins, and newsletters published by the Association; motorist maps of the route; and annotated editions of The Complete Official Road Guide of the Lincoln Highway. Photographs from the Lincoln Highway Association Records have been digitized and are accessible online at the Lincoln Highway Digital Image Collection (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/l/linchigh). The Digital Image Collection contains over 3,000 images including views of construction underway, towns and cities, markers, bridges, cars, camp sites, scenic views, and snapshots of Association directors and field secretaries traveling the route.

The Lincoln Highway Association Records date from 1911 to 1993 with the bulk of materials concentrated before 1930. The records are divided into five series: Official Business (1912-1941), Correspondence (1912-1929), Planning (1914-1940), Publicity (1911-1993), Publications (1915-1935), Jens Jensen Drawings (1922-1924) and Miscellaneous.

The Lincoln Highway Association archive was donated to the University of Michigan's Transportation Library in 1937. The archive was transferred to the Special Collections Library in 1992.

Communication was frequent between members of the Association as well as with officials from towns, counties, states, and the federal government. Correspondence and meeting minutes make up an important part of the collection. The Association published reports, bulletins, and newsletters to keep board members and the public aware of the Highway's progress. Maps of the driving route along with mileages were provided for motorists for navigation as were five editions of The Complete Official Road Guide of the Lincoln Highway .

Photographs from the Lincoln Highway Association Records have been digitized and are accessible online at the Lincoln Highway Digital Image Collection (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/l/linchigh). The Digital Image Collection contains over 3,000 images including views of construction underway, towns and cities, markers, bridges, cars, camp sites, scenic views, and snapshots of Association directors and field secretaries traveling the route.