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Collection

Phil Clifford collection, 1914-1917

0.25 linear feet

This collection is made up of letters that Phil Clifford, a student at the Phillips Exeter Academy, wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Clifford of West Medford and Boston, Massachusetts, and to his sister, Lizze. The letters detail Clifford's academic and monetary struggles.

This collection contains 62 letters and 2 postcards that Phil Clifford, a student at the Phillips Exeter Academy, wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Clifford of West Medford and Boston, Massachusetts, and to his sister, Lizze, from October 16, 1914-May 13, 1917. During his time at the school, he assured his parents of his efforts to raise his grades, seldom higher than Cs, and discussed leisure activities such as attending football games and visiting the area around Exeter, New Hampshire. In his second year, he joined the school's Kappa Delta Pi fraternity. Along with academic troubles, Clifford faced persistent financial difficulties and frequently asked his parents to send him money and postage stamps. On several occasions, he provided itemized lists of recent expenses. In his final letter (May 13, 1917), he mentioned his fraternity's financial shortfall, caused by the loss of several members to the United States Army after the country's formal entrance into World War I. Two postcards have images of the academy's chapel and library, respectively, and two advertising cards promote Arthur Clifford's produce company, A. Clifford & Co.

Collection

Samuel Abbot Smith collection, 1843-1853

10 items

This collection is made up of personal letters that Samuel Abbot Smith received from friends and family members while attending Phillips Exeter Academy, Harvard College, and Harvard Divinity School in the mid-1800s. His correspondents discussed their daily activities, Smith's education, and other subjects.

This collection is made up of 10 personal letters that Samuel Abbot Smith received from friends and family members while attending Phillips Exeter Academy, Harvard College, and Harvard Divinity School in the mid-1800s. The first letter, written by Horatio H. Whitten of "Great Falls," mentions Whitten's new schoolteacher and local factories (November 6, 1843). The letter includes a small drawing of a face in profile.

Samuel Abbot Smith's grandfather, Abiel Abbot, and his "Aunt Abby" wrote 5 letters to Smith from Peterborough, New Hampshire, between October 15, 1844, and January 9, 1853. They provided news of their lives and of family members' and friends' health and activities. Abby referred to social groups, her religious activities, Smith's education, and, on one occasion, fashionable summer coats (May 25, 1846). Abiel Abbot advised his grandson to read Roman history and take courses in elocution. He also provided suggestions for his grandson's salutatory address and discussed Samuel's mother's finances. In one letter, he shared his distaste for political mass meetings (October 15, 1844). Abiel and Abby's final letter encloses a German-language letter from Marie A. Peabody to Samuel Abbot Smith.

Smith received 2 letters from "Mother," likely his father's second wife and widow, Elizabeth Dow, on September 10, 1848, and July 9, 1849. Writing from Exeter, New Hampshire, she noted the recent anniversary of her husband's death; mentioned her attendance at a lecture by "Bushnell" that touched on Calvinism and other tops; and discussed her plans to travel to Cambridge, Massachusetts, for her son's graduation from Harvard College. She shared a story of an acquaintance who had served in the Mexican War and reported that the man desired a Canadian revolution so he could earn a commission as captain in a New York militia company.

Smith's final correspondent, Julius Crone, wrote twice from Peterborough, New Hampshire, on October 6, 1850, and February 21, 1851. He discussed his work, local news, a meeting of a social group (the "R. C."), and his envy for Smith, who was associated with "amiable scholars" such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He expressed his concern for Smith's health and his desire that Smith could continue his studies despite his ailments.