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Collection

Kozo Sasaki Collection

3,185 items

The Kozo Sasaki collection is comprised of approximately 3,185 images of Asian artwork. The images are a compilation of slides and black & white photographs taken by Dr. Kozo Sasaki. The artwork ranges from the Momoyama period (1573-1603) to the Taisho period (1912-1926).

The Kozo Sasaki collection contains 3,033 slides and 152 black & white photographs taken by Dr. Kozo Sasaki himself. The slides and photographs depict Asian artwork, primarily Japanese, ranging from the late 16th century to the early 20th century and cover the Momoyama (1573-1603) to Taisho periods (1912-1926). The majority of the images are Edo period paintings and hanging scrolls. Many of the slides were taken of art in situ. Also included in the collection are images of sculptures, ceramics, mandalas, woodblock prints, sketches, illustrations, decorative arts, and photographs of temples. A set of twelve Japanese handscrolls are captured in a series of 152 black & white photographs.

Collection

Asian Scrolls Collection, 1046 B.C.E.-1915 C.E. (majority within 618 C.E.-1644 C.E.)

56 items

The Asian Scrolls collection is comprised of 56 facsimile handscrolls and books of Japanese and Chinese origin. The scrolls depict landscapes and animals, as well as scenes from famous works and stories. Among the scrolls are also examples of the calligraphy of famous artists, such as Kobo-Daishi. The originals were created throughout the Tang, Sung, and Ming dynasties.

The Asian Scrolls collection is composed of 56 facsimile handscrolls and books of Japanese and Chinese origin. The scrolls depict landscapes, animals, and scenes from famous works and stories. Among the scrolls are examples of the calligraphy of famous artists, such as Kobo-Daishi. The original scrolls were created throughout the Tang, Sung, and Ming dynasties. This collection contains copies of the Japanese work “Ippen Shomin Ekotoba” and “Letter to Saicho” and the Chinese work “Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace." As these scrolls are reproductions, the originals are housed in other institutions such as the British Museum, Beijing’s Palace Museum, and Honolulu’s Academy of Arts. Four of the scrolls are of Chinese artwork but have been reproduced by the Japanese, and therefore, the artist’s names have been translated differently.

Mixed within the collection is a series of approximately five books. The leaves of the books are connected in an alternating format, creating an accordion style book. While many of the books contain artwork depicting scenes of natures and scenes from famous works, one book contains photographs of bronze Chinese objects. The photographs have titles but the book is untitled.

Collection

Bartolomé de las Casas Tyrannies et Cruautez des Espagnols Perpetrees es Indes Occidentales..., 1582

One volume

This volume is an early French translation of Bartolomé de Las Casas influential treatise Brevissima Relacion de la Destruccion de las India, an indictment of the Spanish conquerors for acts of brutality inflicted on the indigenous peoples of the New World.

In 1539, Bartolomé de las Casas wrote Breuissima relacion de la destruycion de las Indias..., a short treatise that indicted the Spanish conquerors for acts of brutality inflicted on the American Indians in the New World. The first of nine tracts on this subject, Brevissima was first published in 1552 and later published in France in 1579 as Tyrannies et Cruautez des Espagnols Perpetres es Indes Occidentales Quon dit le Nouveau Monde: Brievement Descrites en Lettre Castillane par L'Evesque Don Frere Bartelemy De Las Casas...fidelement traduites par Jackques De Miggrode: à Paris par Guillaume Julien.... Clements manuscript was likely prepared in 1582 for an illustrated Paris edition which was never printed; the 17 watercolor illustrations, depicting gruesome acts of torture, are similar to the engravings used by DeBry for his 1598 Latin edition.

Las Casas wrote two chronicles, Historia General de las Indias and Historia Apologetica de las Indias, which were designed to form a single work. He asked his executors not to publish them until forty years after his death. They were not printed, in fact, until 1875-1876 at Madrid, when they appeared under the title "Historia de las Yndias." The original manuscripts are in the Biblioteca de la Academia de la Historia, Madrid. The Clements copy corresponds to the prologue and first 11 chapters of the printed Historia General.

Collection

Sir Walter Raleigh, A Discourse of the Peace with Spain and retayning of the Netherlands, 1602

1 volume

Sir Walter Raleigh's A Discourse of the Peace with Spain and retayning of the Netherlands is a 49-page manuscript treatise intended to persuade King James I to maintain a positive relationship with the Netherlands during peace negotiations with Spain in 1602.

Sir Walter Raleigh's A Discourse of the Peace with Spain and retayning of the Netherlands is a 49-page treatise, bound in vellum, intended to persuade King James I to maintain a positive relationship with the Netherlands during peace negotiations with Spain in 1602. Raleigh outlined the reasons for his belief that England should accept an alliance with the Netherlands following a thaw in relations with Spain and discussed relationships between major European powers.

Collection

Joseph Woory account, 1666

6 pages (1 item)

The Joseph Woory account records the travels of an English expedition that set out from Charles Town on June 16, 1666, to explore the area from Cape Romano down to Port Royal.

Joseph Woory was a member of the English expedition that set out from Charles Town on June 16, 1666, to explore the area from Cape Romano (Cape Fear, called Cape San Romano by the Spanish) down to Port Royal. The expedition took 26 days, during which time they visited St. Helena Island, where they saw a large wooden Spanish cross, Edisto, and Kiawah Island. Woory wrote about the rich quality of the soil, the different kinds of vegetation, varieties of fish and fowl, and Indian fields planted with corn, peas, and beans. The explorers visited Indian villages at Edisto and St. Helena, where they left behind one of their company, Henry Woodward, to learn the Indian language. Woory reported that the Indians were friendly and "seemed very willing to have us settle amongst them." The company sailed from Port Royal on July 9 and arrived at Charles Town on the 12th.

Collection

Detroit (Michigan) Collection, 1672, 1868, and undated

.25 cubic foot (in 1 box)

Collection includes copies of French documents re: Detroit military and Indian relations history, letters from a French Register in Quebec, documents in English on same topics, probably copied from Gen. Thomas Gage's papers, and later additions of miscellaneous Detroit history documents in English.

This collection includes nineteenth century copies of French documents concerning early military and Indian relations history, 1698, 1738, and some 1743/1747 letters copied from a French register in Quebec in 1842. Most of these documents were numbered and compiled in a specific order.

There are also documents in English concerning the same topics, 1763, 1766, probably copied from Gen. Thomas Gage’s paper. Gage’s papers are housed at the Clements Library in Ann Arbor.

Lastly, later additions to this collection include various miscellaneous documents in English about Detroit history, 1672, circa 1868? These papers were in the State Papers Office, Military Correspondence Series.

Many variations in spelling are evident throughout the collection.

Lewis Cass (1782-1866) supposedly ordered a copy of documents relating to early Detroit history from France during his years as Governor of Michigan (1813-1831). It is unknown whether or not some of this material could have eventually been purchased at auction for the Clarke.

Special thanks goes to Barbarah Saungweme who translated some of the French language materials.

Collection

Alexander Dunlop memorandum book, 1686-1688, 1699

93 folios

Alexander Dunlop was a Scottish immigrant to South Carolina in 1685. His memorandum book contains a short narrative of his voyage to Antigua, entries concerning his financial affairs, a letter to his wife, and land rental entries from his son John.

The memorandum book of Alexander Dunlop is divided into three parts. The bulk of the book is written in Dunlop's hand between 1686 and 1688. Later additions were made by Dunlop's son John in 1699. Two additional entries are made in an unidentified hand.

The entries by Alexander Dunlop include a short narrative of the voyage of the vessel Richard and John of London from Kelburne (south of Largs, Ayrshire), in 1686 [folios 93-92, reversed at back of book]. Other entries related to this voyage include a note concerning £15 received from Lady Cardross, February 26, "to be delivered to My Lord Cardros when I shall come to portroyall in Carolina" and a note dated July 26 in Antigua that the money "was sent by me A D to Mylord Cardros with Tho: Steill some tyme my servitor according to his recept" [folio 2]. A copy of Steill's receipt, partly torn away, is on folio 4 the verso of folio 2 contains more accounts between Dunlop and Steill, particularly pay for the latter's service in the several weeks spent in Antigua. Folios 5 and 90b-89b contain accounts possibly related to this voyage.

The book also has a long letter from Alexander Dunlop to his wife Antonia [folios 7-13b]. Topics of the letter are money matters, sale of an estate to the Earl of Dundonald, the Earl's resignation in favor of the Dunlops' son John, their other children, and debts. This letter may have been Alexander's draft of intentions for care of his affairs after his death as he writes, "so you & freends may divyde among the childen as they deserve" [folio 9b:]. Other entries by Alexander also concern financial affairs and debts [folios 3, 5-6, and 89b-86b, folio 88 mentions "tutors" and "curators."]

The entries of John Dunlop all address the Dunlop's affairs in Scotland including financial notes and debts. Detailed descriptions, and tables titled "Rentall of the Lands of Dunlop," June 13, 1699 mentions a number of specific places, including the parks of Dunlop [folio 17], Auchentiber [folios 29b, 34], Stewarton [folio 34b], Mirrimouth [folio 20] and rents paid in money or in kind included meal, beer, hens, capons, coal, etc., some given with cash equivalents.

Additional notes in an unknown hand are made at the end of the rental accounts and with the letter of Alexander to his wife.

Collection

Massachusetts Bay (Colony) Treasury accounts, 1699

1 volume

The Massachusetts Bay (Colony) Treasury accounts contain records of expenditures by the Colony between May 1698 and May 1699.

James Taylor, Treasurer and Receiver General, recorded the Massachusetts Bay Colony Treasury accounts, which contain 36 pages of the colony's financial transactions between May 1698 and May 1699. The first few pages are composed of tax records for towns and counties in the colonies. This is followed by a list of payments to individuals for duties performed, which makes up the remainder of the volume. Many of the payments are to soldiers, judges, messengers, keepers of "French and Indian Prisoners of War" (p. 13), and providers of transportation. Also of interest is a payment of £50 to Increase Mather for his responsibilities as President of Harvard (p. 24). In addition, the accounts contain numerous references to Native Americans, who were regularly paid for their service in fighting other tribes. The accounts provide a thorough record of the Colony's many services and expenses for 1698-1699.

Collection

Architecture Militaire, [1700s?]

1 volume

The Architecture Militaire is a single manuscript volume that provides instructions for the construction of a fortified building in the shape of a star. The volume consists primarily of prose description, but also includes a series of 16 illustrative plates showcasing detailed architectural drawings.

The Architecture Militaire is a single manuscript volume that provides instructions for the construction of a fortified building in the shape of a star. The volume consists primarily of prose description, but also includes a series of 16 illustrative plates showcasing detailed architectural drawings. The drawings are signed "A Toulouse chez Baour." The book has 12 chapters about construction methods, including lists of potential problems with suggested remedies. The volume includes discussions and critiques of existing construction methods, including those of the ancient French, the Dutch, the Comte de Pagan, Vauban, and others (chapter 11). The final chapter, entitled "Idee generalle de l'attaque d'une place et de la maniere de fortifier un camp," contains equations relevant to fort construction. The final section of the book consists of detailed ink drawings similar, but not identical to, those found in Samuel Marolois's Fortification ou Architecture Militaire Tant Offensive que Deffensive. These show different aspects of construction relevant to the text and include one page illustrating various military paraphernalia.

Collection

Practical Mathematics manuscript, 1700s

1 volume

The Practical Mathematics manuscript contains definitions and problems related to algebra, geometry, trigonometry, navigation, and surveying. Many of the problems are accompanied by illustrated figures and/or practical examples.

The Practical Mathematics manuscript contains definitions and problems related to algebra, geometry, trigonometry, navigation, and surveying. These categories are divided into specific applications; the section on algebra deals with topics such as basic algebraic statements, algebraic fractions, simple and quadratic equations, and arithmetical and geometrical progressions. Most of the problems are accompanied by illustrated figures and/or examples of concepts' practical applications. A section concerning globes pertains to both terrestrial and celestial globes, and includes a list of the signs of the zodiac, as well as descriptions of navigational methods, accompanied by a compass rose and charts, including "Mercator's Charts."

The manuscript also explains methods for determining location and time by observing celestial objects, and contains instructions for keeping ships' logs and surveying notes. A section on navigation includes a copied log from the voyage of the Pegasus from England to Barbados (January 31, 1737-March 22, 1737), as well as a map showing the coasts of France and Spain and the islands around Barbados. Some of the surveying problems are illustrated with a sailing ship, a tree, and a turret.

Partial List of Subjects
  • Algebra
    • Simple Equations
    • Quadratic Equations
    • Arithmetic Progressions
    • Geometric Progressions
  • The Use of Globes
    • Terrestrial Globe
    • Celestial Globe
  • Spherical Geometry
  • Spherical Trigonometry
    • [Acute] Angled
    • Right Angled
    • Oblique Angled
  • "To Find the Prime or Golden Number"
  • Geometry
  • Trigonometry
    • Plain Trigonometry
    • Spherical Trigonometry
  • Navigation
    • Latitude
    • Longitude
    • Sailing
      • Plain Sailing
      • Traverse Sailing
      • Mercator's Sailing
      • Parallel Sailing
      • Oblique Sailing
      • Plain Sailing by Arithmetic
  • Observation by the Meridian Altitude or Zenith Distance of the Sun or Stars
  • Rules for Keeping a Journal [Ship's Log]
  • Astronomy
  • Dialing
  • Surveying
  • Mensuration
    • Mensuration of Superficies
    • Mensuration of Solids
    • Measuring of Timber