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Collection

Albert E. St. Germain collection, 1894-1964 (majority within 1917-1919)

0.75 linear feet

The Albert E. St. Germain collection contains correspondence, military documents, and other items relating to the St. Germain family. The bulk of the collection pertains to Albert St. Germain's service in the United States Army's press service in Europe during and just after World War I.

The Albert E. St. Germain collection (over 190 items) contains correspondence, military documents, and other items relating to the St. Germain family. The bulk of the collection pertains to Albert St. Germain's service in the United States Army's press division in Europe during and just after World War I.

The Correspondence series (28 items) is made up of personal letters related to members of the St. Germain family. Sisters Clarinda (1 item) and M. Clementina (8 item) wrote French-language letters to their parents from the Convent of Mercy in Meriden, Connecticut, between 1894 and 1900. Other convent correspondents included Sister Teresa, who invited the St. Germain family to a ceremony (August 10, 1896), and Sister M. Augustine, who sent a telegram about Sister Clementina's death in November 1900. A woman named "Leontina" wrote 4 letters to Leon St. Germain from Québec in 1905.

Albert E. St. Germain wrote 6 letters to his mother and 2 letters to his brother Oscar while serving in the United States Army in France during and immediately after World War I. He described his travels in France and discussed some of his duties in the press section. In 1919, an acquaintance named J. Morgan wrote Albert St. Germain a personal letter and a letter of recommendation. Later correspondence includes a letter that one of Albert's children wrote to him in 1959, a letter about the 50 reunion of the Bulkeley High School class of 1914, and a World War II-era greeting card from the South Pacific.

The Documents series is divided into two subseries. Military Documents (97 items) are mostly comprised of news bulletins and intelligence summaries providing details about the Allied war effort in France from September 1918-November 1918, as well as 2 copies of Gerald Morgan's recollections about service as Chief Field Censor for the American Expeditionary Forces, written in February 1919. Department of Labor and Personal Documents (15 items) include intelligence tests, Albert St. Germain's employment history, a blank naturalization form, documents related to Leon St. German's estate, and documents regarding field stations during World War II.

The Photographs series (3 items) contains 2 formal card photograph portraits of an unidentified couple and of Albert E. St. Germain, as well as a photograph of Albert E. Saint Germain, in uniform, shaking hands with a French soldier. The latter photograph is enclosed with a copy of the New York newspaper that ran the photograph on August 4, 1918.

The Writings and Pencil Sketch series is comprised of 7 copies of stories that Albert E. St. Germain wrote around the World War I era. The writings include an account of his interactions with a French citizen during the war, a camping trip, and various other subjects; some of the drafts have manuscript notes. The collection has duplicate copies of 2 stories. The series includes a pencil drawing of "Le Vieux Moulin."

The Printed Items series (29 items) is divided into four subseries:
  • The Cards and Currency subseries (4 items) consists of 3 business cards of Albert E. St. Germain and a French banknote.
  • The Maps subseries (5 items) contains printed maps of the Moselle River, the Rhine River, and Bar-le-Duc, France; one of the Rhine River maps was produced for members of the army of occupation. Also included is a blueprint map of properties that Leon St. Germain owned in Waterford, Connecticut.
  • The Pamphlets subseries (6 items) has the following items: a retrospective and commencement program related to the Bulkeley School class of 1914, a cover from a copy of The Louis Allis Messenger, a page from a printed recipe book, a pamphlet about the United States flag, and a copy of the United States Constitution with additional information for use in passing the country's citizenship examination.
  • The Newspapers subseries (13 items) contains around 10 articles about World War I, the Bulkeley School, Albert E. St. Germain, and army censorship. The newspaper articles originate from papers in Connecticut and France. Three copies of The Stars and Stripes, dated 1918, are also present.

The Address Book and Fragments series (14 items) includes manuscript, typed, and printed fragments, and an address book that Albert St. Germain owned while working for the United States Department of Labor.

The Artifacts series consists of a brown leather satchel.

Collection

Amateur Musical and Dramatic Society constitution and minute book, 1878-1879

1 volume

This volume contains the constitution and meeting minutes of the Amateur Musical and Dramatic Society (A.M.D. Society) of East Providence, Rhode Island, as well as apparently unrelated financial accounts.

This volume contains the constitution and meeting minutes of the Amateur Musical and Dramatic Society (A.M.D. Society) of East Providence, Rhode Island, as well as apparently unrelated financial accounts.

The volume begins with the miscellaneous financial accounting before the content switches to that of the Amateur Musical and Dramatic Society. The A.M.D. Society was created to raise funds to purchase books for the Union Grammar School; additional content includes a copy of the Society's constitution, by-laws, and meeting minutes, as well as the names of the elected President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer of the Society.

Also present within the volume is a blank manuscript form for a last will and testament.

Collection

Brookfield Social Library collection, 1805-1848

1 volume

The Brookfield Social Library collection is made up of records compiled by the library's members between 1805 and 1848, including a portion of its constitution, meeting minutes, and accounts from book sales.

The Brookfield Social Library collection contains 82 pages of records compiled by the library's members between 1805 and 1848, including a portion of its constitution, meeting minutes, and accounts from book sales.

The first 2 pages contain Articles 6-15 of the Library's constitution, and are followed by 2 pages of signatures; several families, such as the Hoxie and Whitford families, are represented. The signatures are followed by an extensive list of books held by the library, including their prices and catalog numbers, as well as financial records pertaining to books purchased between April 4, 1805 and April 7, 1814. The bulk of the volume (titled "Scrap Book") consists of meeting minutes taken between April 1, 1806, and April 18, 1848, primarily recording administrative resolutions and, occasionally, the results of public book sales. Some entries concern the amount of the librarian's annual compensation, lending policies, and the formation of committees for collection assessment and for the acquisition of new books.

A newspaper clipping describing the "Probable Sad Fate of Sister Wilcox" is pasted onto the inside back cover.

Collection

Grace Chandler Footlight Club scrapbook, 1886-1898 (majority within 1894-1898)

1 volume

The Grace Chandler Footlight Club scrapbook contains correspondence, photographs, plays, and ephemera related to the club's activities in the mid- to late 1890s. The amateur theatrical company performed in Eliot Hall, a theater in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts.

The Grace Chandler Footlight Club scrapbook contains around 45 pages of correspondence, photographs, plays, and ephemera pertaining to the club's activities in the late 19th century. Most items are dated between 1894, when Chandler joined, and 1898.

Chandler collected numerous programs from the Footlight Club's many performances, including several in which she participated as a member of the cast and a few that served as charity events for a convalescent home and other causes; tickets for performances and dress rehearsals are also included. Chandler received official correspondence regarding her membership and directors' reports, as well as manuscript letters congratulating her for recent performances; most are still in their original envelopes. Of particular interest is a letter from Horace Vale to "Miss Verrinder" calling off their engagement after hearing rumors of her "desperate flirtation" with another man (postmarked March 20, 1895). The album includes 7 photographs of sets on a stage. Other items include newspaper clippings, printed copies of plays, an advertisement, a dried rose, and copies of the Footlight Club's constitution as amended in December 1888 and January 1895.

Collection

John W. Echols collection, 1890-1932 (majority within 1890-1898)

16 items

This collection contains material related to John W. Echols, who served as supreme president of the American Protective Association in the mid-1890s. Included are letters of recommendation, personal correspondence, a speech draft, printed circulars, and other items.

This collection contains 16 items related to John W. Echols, who served as supreme president of the American Protective Association in the mid-1890s. Included are letters of recommendation, personal correspondence, a speech draft, printed circulars, and other items.

The Correspondence series (10 items) contains 9 letters and 1 telegram. Echols received 2 letters from friends, one of whom shared an anecdote about meeting Henry Ward Beecher, and a telegram from Mark Hanna, chairman of the Republican National Committee. Echols also wrote a draft letter to Cornelius Newton Bliss, Secretary of the Interior, about his desire for Dr. George DuBose to retain his current office. Five letters of recommendation for Echols (all dated November 1890) are addressed to Pennsylvania Governor Robert E. Pattison, concerning Echols's candidacy for the office of state attorney general. The final item in the series is a typed letter that Echols received from James Sargent, in which he shared his wish for an American victory during the Spanish-American War and anticipated the continued success of the American Protective Association (May 9, 1898).

The Speech series (1 item) contains a typewritten draft of a speech by Echols entitled "National Destiny," with manuscript annotations. The speech, which Echols delivered on July 4, 1892, lauds the sacrifices of Civil War soldiers and calls for United States citizens to remain vigilant about protecting their country. The speech includes an excerpt from Joseph Rodman Drake's poem "The American Flag," and concludes with lines from "The Star Spangled Banner."

The Printed Items series (5 items) is comprised of 2 printed American Protective Association (APA) circulars, a copy of the APA Supreme Council's constitution, and 2 newspaper clippings. The circulars, distributed to APA chapters in August and October 1896, discuss the upcoming presidential election, call for the complete separation of church and state within the United States, restate the organization's core principles, and urge voters to check their congressional representatives' voting records. The second circular also discusses Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. One newspaper clipping relates to United States Senator Patrick Walsh; the other is an obituary for John W. Echols.

Collection

Liberty and Chillisquaque Temperance Society constitution and minutes, 1842-1851

1 volume

This volume contains the constitution and meeting minutes of the Liberty and Chillisquaque Temperance Society of Columbia County (and, later, parts of Montour County), Pennsylvania.

This volume (around 80 pages) contains the constitution and meeting minutes of the Liberty and Chillisquaque Temperance Society of Columbia County (and, later, parts of Montour County), Pennsylvania.

The first 5 pages consist of the society's constitution, comprised of 12 articles about the society's mission, officers, and administrative matters. The following 15 pages list the "names of teetotalers," primarily women. The bulk of the volume (around 55 pages) has meeting minutes dated December 1842-December 1851. The Liberty and Chillisquaque Temperance Society met at churches, schoolhouses, and other locations in several towns, including Chillisquaque, Lewisburg, and Danville. The minutes, recorded irregularly, reflect the group's monthly activities, such as listening to addresses by pastors or other speakers. The group often distributed an abstinence pledge, and the minutes record the number of people who signed the pledge. Many entries contain the names of newly elected or re-elected officers, and later minutes pertain to other administrative issues, such as the society's division into two branches. Secretaries of the Liberty and Chillisquaque Temperance Society included Thomas Vansant, James F. Murray, James McMahan, Thomas Strawbridge, and Joshua D. Wilson. The volume's final 5 pages (including its back endpaper) contain notes in pencil about the temperance society's organization and about an election for church elders and deacons (dated 1866).

Collection

Michigan Union Publications, 1905-1992, 1908-1990

2.5 linear feet

Publications of the Michigan Union includes miscellaneous annual reports, brochures, constitutions, directories, histories, manuals, newsletters, organizational charts, programs, regulations, reprints, schedules of the Michigan Union; as well as musical scores and programs from the Michigan Union Opera, Mimes, and Musket productions.

Publications of the Michigan Union includes miscellaneous annual reports, brochures, constitutions, directories, histories, manuals, newsletters, organizational charts, programs, regulations, reprints, schedules of the Michigan Union; as well as musical scores and programs from the Michigan Union Opera, Mimes, and Musket productions. The Publications series is divided into two subseries: Unit Publications and Sub-Unit Publications

Collection

Milton Sacred Musical Society constitution and minutes and Levi Jones estate accounts, 1817, 1847-1848 (majority within 1817)

1 volume

Levi Jones of Milton, New Hampshire, recorded the Milton Sacred Musical Society's constitution, monthly meeting minutes, and membership fines in this volume between January and December 1817. Also included are financial records pertaining to Jones's estate after his death in 1847.

This volume (34 pages) contains minutes and other records related to the Milton Sacred Musical Society of Milton, New Hampshire, and financial accounts related to the estate of Levi Jones, the society's first secretary. The first section (22 pages) pertains to the Milton Sacred Musical Society. Its founding members adopted a constitution on January 1, 1817, outlining the group's internal organization and some of its formal procedures (pp. 5-10). Officers included a president, vice president, account auditors, secretary, and librarian, and members paid dues and additional fees for missing meetings or disobeying the president. The constitution also described procedures for admitting new members. The document is accompanied by a membership list and 3 pages of brief monthly meeting minutes for the year 1817 (pp. 19-22). The society cancelled their July and September meetings because of funerals. A piece of paper laid into the volume after the minutes contains a note certifying the publication of marriage banns for Stephen B. Stacey and Joanna Door, signed by Levi Jones in his capacity as town clerk (February 3, 1817). The second section of the book, which begins from the opposite cover, contains 11 pages of accounts between the Milton Sacred Musical Society and individual members. These accounts primarily reflect fees assessed after members failed to attend monthly meetings, and most charges are between 20 and 40 cents. None are recorded as having been paid.

The final 12 pages have financial accounts pertaining to the estate of Levi Jones, recorded between September 2, 1847, and April 13, 1848. Two pages of running accounts document expenditures and income, and the following 10 pages are comprised of notes regarding payments to specific individuals. The volume's interior covers were also used for unidentified mathematical calculations.

Collection

Montgomery (N.Y.) Farmers & Mechanicks Debating Society and Good-Will Debating Society record book, 1823-1825, 1840-1846

1 volume

Two debating societies based in Montgomery, New York, recorded their constitutions and meeting minutes in this volume in the early to mid-19th century. At weekly meetings, members debated questions related to politics, morality, and other subjects, though religious topics were banned.

Two debating societies based in Montgomery, New York, recorded their constitutions and meeting minutes in this volume (approximately 180 pp.) in the early to mid-19th century. At weekly meetings, members discussed political issues and moral questions.

The title page has an unattributed epigram taken from verses written by Robert Burns for the Freemasons. Following this, the Farmers & Mechanicks Debating Society of Montgomery recorded its first minutes (February 4, 1823), which pre-date its constitution (February 11, 1823). The 4-page constitution and 2-page list of members' signatures are followed by about 70 pages of minutes from the society's weekly meetings. Every week, the group discussed a member's question, posed and chosen the week before, with members arguing in the negative and affirmative. Questions covered a range of moral and political subjects such as quality of life, wealth, women's rights, punishment for crimes, and finances, though religious topics were banned. The minutes record the names of members presenting either side of the question and occasionally concern administrative affairs such as officer elections. The final dated entry appears on January 26, 1825, with one last entry from "Saturday evening Feb 28" of an unknown year.

The second section (approximately 90 pages) contains the minutes and constitution of the Farmers & Mechanicks Debating Society's successor, the Good-Will Debating Society, in the Town of Montgomery. Its constitution, which has later annotations and alterations, is largely similar to the earlier document. Weekly meeting minutes cover December 11, 1840-January 30, 1846, though some dates are missing or appear out of chronological sequence. The society's debate topics were similar to its predecessor's, though some related to contemporary political issues such as the annexation of Texas. A group of loosely tied newspaper clippings laid into the volume (dated 1846) pertain to the Mexican-American War and topics related to mechanics and manufacturing.

Collection

Montgomery (N.Y.) Female Evangelical Society record book, 1822-1841

1 volume

The Female Evangelical Society of Montgomery, New York, kept annual meeting minutes in this volume from 1822, the year of its establishment, to 1841. Its members raised funds for missionary societies and educational establishments.

The Female Evangelical Society of Montgomery, New York, kept annual meeting minutes in this volume (39 pp.) from 1822, the year of its establishment, to 1841. The group, whose mission was "extending the knowledge of divine truth," adopted a constitution on May 6, 1822 (pages 1-2), and kept minutes of its annual meetings, held on the first Monday in May, from 1822-1841 (pages 3-39); the minutes from 1835 and 1839 are missing. Each set of minutes has a report from the treasurer, who collected dues and other income, and the names of the society's presidents, treasurers, secretaries, and managers. Every year, the society donated money to religious groups, occasionally to purchase life memberships in various societies for the pastors of Goodwill Church. Three undated newspaper clippings with poetry composed for The Philadelphia Saturday Courier (2 items) and a list of names (1 item) are laid into the book, and the minutes are also followed by a 9-page list of the society's members to 1828.